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So far from reading the git tutorails I have understood that for sharing my project files residing in my ubuntu linux server I need to create a bare repository and link it to the actual repository, so that when users clone the actual repo they get the actual repo having the actual work files.

And when they push their changes to the server the post-receive hook now updates the actual repo containing work files.

This is all I could understand and beyound that I have a lot of confusion for which I have the foll questions:

1) How do I create my bare repo.
2) How do I link it to the actual repo consisting the actual work files.
3) And what is this post-receive hook? Where does it reside? And what configurations do I need to do for the same.
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How do I create my bare repo.

Read this.

To clone existing repository into a new bare repo, you would run this command:

git clone --bare my_project my_project.git

How do I link it to the actual repo consisting the actual work files.

Read this.

The non-bare repository can add the bare as a remote:

git remote add <name> <remote-URL>

Then, from the non-bare:

git push <name-of-remote> <branch-to-push-from>:<remote-branch-to-push-to>. 

Again, this is all covered in the Git SCM book, which I recommend you read before asking the same question again on StackOverflow.

Read the book. It gives you the terms to search for (such as git remote repositories, git bare server, etc). There are lots of questions on StackOverflow about this, when you know what to search for.

And what is this post-receive hook?

It's a script that is run after the repository is pushed to. (After it has received data, the repository runs the post-receive script - sensible naming).

Where does it reside?

In the hooks directory of the bare repository; in .git/hooks otherwise. Read this.

And what configurations do I need to do for the same.

You do not need a post-receive hook to do what you're asking to do (set up a basic bare repository so a small number of multiple users can git push and git pull from it). If you do not know what a hook is, you do not need one at this point. Set up your repository, get comfortable using basic git commands and working with collaborators on a bare repo, and ask a specific question about setting up and using a post-receive hook.

I can't stress this enough: read the book. It will help. I learned a lot. :) It will tell you how to:

  1. How do I create my bare repo. (This is Chapter 4).
  2. How do I link it to the actual repo consisting the actual work files. (This is Chapter 2, section 5).
  3. And what is this post-receive hook? Where does it reside? And what configurations do I need to do for the same. (This is Chapter 7, section 3).
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1  
You have a lot of patience. I hope it's worth it. –  Dietrich Epp Jan 8 '13 at 14:24
    
@simont: Thanks a lot for you effort and patience.I'll follow you suggestions ang get back if I face any issues. –  gautam vegeta Jan 8 '13 at 14:43
2  
@gautamvegeta Heh. I struggled with git for several months before I read that silly book - it really helped me. Some of the concepts are a little tough to understand, but when you get your head around them they're really neat and sensible. Apologies if this answer seemed impatient - reading the book, slowly, and giving yourself time to understand will really help. Also, making a few practice repositories is also useful. :) Plus, if you get super stuck, StackOverflow will answer most of your questions pretty fast ;) –  simont Jan 8 '13 at 14:45

The .git folder is the real repository. It will be a folder in the working folder locally, but a bare repository doesn't have a working folder so it has a .git extension.

A bare repository is one without a work folder (i.e. where the files are checked out). To create a bare repository use git init --bare <repository name>.

When working locally, a git clone <repository path> <working folder> is executed to make a local copy of the remote repository. This is then updated on regular basis with git fetch or git pull and change are applied back to the server with git pull. Cloning a repository locally creates a name for it called a remote, this name is origin.

A branch is basically a named path of development and is created with the git branch command. Linking a local branch with a remote branch tells git what to default to when fetching, and pushing and can simplify the commands used. To link, or track, a remote branch use git branch -u <remote>/<branch>.

There is no reason to get involved with git's various hooks for any of these basic operations.

The git book covers these basic operations well.

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