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In many programming languages, many questions have been raised to stop execution of a thread.In c/c++ goto is still used, where as in Java , goto is not used,but still it's reserved; stop(), stop(Throwable) and suspend(), destroy() and resume(), which were intended to provide the basic functionality for starting and stopping a thread has been depreciated. Can we use goto to simply to move out of a thread?

Somethig like this :

//Thread block

{...
 if(some condition)
goto out;
.....
 ...
 }//thread block over

out:
// I am out!!
}

I know using goto is a very very bad practice, but can still it be used like this?

UPDATE:

Or:

//Thread block

{...
 if(some condition)
goto out;
.....
 ...
 out:
 // I am out!!
 }//thread block over

From the comments,is this the solution?

UPDATE2:

Well,I am getting mix kind of answers.Some yes,some no.I don't use c/c++ much ,otherwise could have implemented and see myself.

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closed as not a real question by Daniel Hilgarth, sashoalm, Daniel Fischer, RivieraKid, kamaci Jan 8 '13 at 16:23

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
no...u cant use it –  Milind Jan 8 '13 at 13:47
1  
what is a thread block? at least in c++ and c, threads are not part of the core language, that is you need some kind of functor execute things in a thread. –  PlasmaHH Jan 8 '13 at 13:47
1  
If you could do that it would not exit the thread but keep running at the new location probably leading to a crash. –  drescherjm Jan 8 '13 at 13:49
1  
@PlasmaHH: In C++11 threads are part of the core language. Of course you still can't exit them with a goto. ;) –  Skalli Jan 8 '13 at 13:51
1  
There is a difference between program flow control and thread context. –  Steve Mayne Jan 8 '13 at 13:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't "move out" of a thread using goto. A thread's execution is not limited to a given scope and just moving to another location in your code will not terminate it.

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yeah,true +1.Nice direct answer.Well,if the program exits,will the thread still be running? –  joey rohan Jan 8 '13 at 14:39
1  
The answer to this question is a bit long. If the main thread has ended, the program will not exit until all the other threads are done, unless you have explicitly created a daemon thread. Here I say if the main thread has ended as I guess that is what you are asking for - of course if the program exits everything associated with it is dead including all threads. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 8 '13 at 14:43

This doesn't work.

  1. You can't goto to another method.
  2. A thread is not bound to a method and one method can be executed by multiple threads.

If the goto location would be in the same method, the execution would simply continue at the new location in the thread that executed the goto statement.

What you can do, is go to the end of the thread method - if the current code is in that method. This won't end the thread, but the goto will move the program flow just before the end of the thread method which will lead to the thread method being finished executing and thus ending the thread.
This is the same effect as simply returning from the thread method.

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please consider my updated question. –  joey rohan Jan 8 '13 at 14:16
    
@joeyrohan: Please see update. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jan 8 '13 at 14:19

Absolutely, you can: you can use goto to transfer control unconditionally to the end of your method from almost anywhere, with very few restrictions. If this is the method that implements your thread, it will exit, ending the thread.

Whether you should is a different question: with very few exceptions, goto makes your program less readable; without exceptions, you can achieve the same result without a goto, and improve readability at the same time. For example, you could use return to end the method implementing the logic of your thread.

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Yeah.. that's what I would have thought. All code is run by threads, so exiting a thread block by jumping to the end seems, well, 'normal'. There may be private resources to be freed at the end, but with appropriate care, why not GOTO EXIT? –  Martin James Jan 8 '13 at 14:01
1  
@MartinJames Java and C# provide nice support for cases like that with the finally keyword, while in C++ and C a goto is an OK choice to deal with resource cleanup at the end of the function. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 8 '13 at 14:04
    
Oh sure, if I have 'finally', then yes. If I had all that stuff, I would probably raise an exception to get out from some inner method. Plain C is just painful now :) –  Martin James Jan 8 '13 at 14:10
    
@dasblinkenlight: goto might be an ok choice for cleanup in C, but I would strongly disagree with it being one for C++ (except maybe for some embedded platforms, which probably don't completely support C++ anyways). Afterall isn't that what we have RAII for? –  Grizzly Jan 8 '13 at 14:14
    
@Grizzly I think that RAII helps your code manage cleanups in the presence of unexpected jumps - exceptions, premature returns, and, yes - gotos. I would discourage use of goto in C++, but not outright ban it. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 8 '13 at 14:16

You can not goto to a label out of the your thread function

You can set the out: at the end of the thread functio. And in this way if you want to stop your thread you can goto the out: (from any place in your thread function) and the thread function will be stopped

If you want to execute some part of your code at the end of your thread you can use pthread_cond_signal(&cond);

the following link contains an example of how to use it: multithread launching order

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No you can't.

But perhaps you don't need to... You can try to use ThreadAbortException (by calling Thread.Abort()) and catch it (yes, within the thread), executing the 'out' functionality, and do a Thread.ResetAbort. Just be careful and be sure to read up on the risks involved on MSDN when calling abort from another thread (which you don't seem to be doing).

See also: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ty8d3wta.aspx

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First of all, putting cleanup code at end of function, and jumping to it with goto is quite valid pattern in C. Use it when ever it makes the code cleaner and easier to understand. Of course it can be abused, and it doesn't work that well when you have multiple levels of functions, so it might encourage making too long functions just to be able to goto to cleanup code. But as long as it's used carefully, goto is quite valid in C. Also, since the question is a bit vague, better say this explicitly: you can not goto between functions. And in languages supporting exceptions, you should use those instead of goto (of course you have to use them right too, not abuse them).

But often, especially with threads, it is better to register cleanup handlers for the thread, so you can then just return or call the thread frameworks "exit this thread" function, instead of using goto to cleanup code.

Finally, with the code above, with no code after out: label, you could just return instead of using goto... This assumes you are using a threading library, which takes a function to run in other thread, and will end the thread when that function returns.

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