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I have been working on this for more than 2 days without success. It will be a common problem, but I can't find a solution. I did do a search!

Problem:

I have some data that I want to read in say, 5 values per line. I know how many I want to read from a value read previously. For example, 6 values to read, spread over 2 lines...

6
10 20 30 40 50
60

so after every 5 variables I want to read a new line. If there are 0 variables, I want to skip the bit to do with this, and if I want to read an exact multiple of 5 variables, then I want to avoid duplicating the NL call.

I tried this...

varblock[ Integer count ]
@init{
Integer varIndex = 0;
}
    : { count > 0 }? ( dp=NUMBER { count--; varIndex++;  }
          { ( varIndex \% 5 ) == 0 }? NL { varIndex = 0; }
          )+ { varIndex > 0 }? => NL
    |
    ;

But I get...

failed predicate: { ( varIndex \% 5 ) == 0 }?

It might be that I misunderstand predicates. I have several other predicates in my grammar that seem to work, but they are not of this type. There, I am trying to skip bits of the grammar depending on the version of the input file.

Thanks.

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Are NL significant in any of your rules? –  Bart Kiers Jan 8 '13 at 15:22

2 Answers 2

NL is just a line feed that is expected at the end of the input lines.

NL    :   ( '\n' | '\r' )+ ;

In other lines we read several other things such as...

"IPE270" "BS 7191 GR 355C" 0.0 0 0

and the values such as STRING, FLOAT, or NUMBER must be on those lines in expected sequences. So if we encounter a NL before we have read the requisite data values, there is a syntax error. So, perhaps the answer to your question is "Yes".

Perhaps I just (over?) simplified the example.

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SOLVED: It was a problem of brackets. I looked at the generated parser code to get a clue.

varblock[ Integer count ]
@init{
   Integer index = 0;
}
   : ( { count > 0 }? => ( NUMBER  { count--; index++; } 
                         | { (index \% 5) == 0 }? => NL ) )+ { index > 0 }? => NL
   |
  ;

This reads values up to 5 per line.

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