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Test One:

    #include <iostream>
    void function(int &parameter);
    int main()
    {
        int variableOne = 0;
        int variableTwo = 6;
        function(variableOne);
        std::cout << variableOne << std::endl;
        function(variableTwo);
        std::cout << variableTwo << std::endl;
        return 0;
    }
    void function(int &parameter) // ???
    {
        parameter += 5;
    }

Test Two:

    #include <iostream>
    int main()
    {
        int variableOne = 2;
        int variableThree = 7;
        int &variableTwo = variableOne;
        std::cout << variableOne << std::endl;
        &variableTwo = variableThree; // ERROR (wrong side of operand etc...)
        std::cout << variableThree << std::endl;
        return 0;
    }

1) So why is it that &parameter can be assigned the value (of the arguments) multiple times, (test one) but &variableTwo (test two) cannot be?

2) Is this because, (test one) the memory address of parameter is assigned to variableOne and variableTwo? Or, does the value of variableOne get assigned to parameter, then variableTwo later on?

3) Perhaps, is it that a new instance of parameter is created each time the function is called?

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&lvalue takes the address of it. You can't change that. The variable is passed into the function by reference. Those are two different concepts. –  chris Jan 8 '13 at 14:16
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you call function with different arguments you're creating a new reference to the argument upon each invocation.

&variableTwo = variableThree;

Here you're trying to assign the value of variableThree to the address of variableTwo, which is illegal (and doesn't make sense either).

Moreover, references cannot be reseated after being created. So, even the following is illegal.

int &variableTwo = variableOne;
variableTwo = variableThree;

Note that the same rule applies to the function as well. If you were to try and reassign the input parameter to refer to some other integer the code wouldn't compile.

void function(int &parameter)
{
    int local = 42;

    parameter += 5;
    parameter = local; // error!
}
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This line of code: &variableTwo = variableThree; does not do what you expect. &variableTwo is the address of variableTwo, not a reference to it. So you try to assign something to an address and this of course will not compile that way.

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right, would you be able to tell me what exactly happens when an argument is passed to a reference parameter? and why multiple variables can be on different occasions? i heard something about references being constant. –  thelittlegumnut Jan 8 '13 at 14:20
    
@thelittlegumnut, References themselves are sort of like constant pointers - you can't change what they reference. It's up to you whether it references constant or non-constant data, though. int &i... and const int &i... are both valid. –  chris Jan 8 '13 at 14:22
2  
You may think of a reference as another name for a given variable. A reference can be "linked" to a variable only when it is declared and you can never change what it is a reference for. In that sense a reference is "constant". Another important fact is that a reference can not be "linked to" nothing. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 8 '13 at 14:23
    
thanks for the replies. the part where i am slightly confused, is that if they can only be linked to one thing, then why does test one print both 5 and 11? wouldn't that involve &parameter linking to variableOne and variableTwo? –  thelittlegumnut Jan 8 '13 at 14:26
1  
@thelittlegumnut: A common issue with people developing in C++ is that concepts and implementations are usually mixed, generating confusion. A reference is conceptually an alias to an existing variable that might (or not) be implemented as a pointer that is automatically dereferenced. But thinking of references as pointers will confuse more than help you. Regarding your last comment, the parameter of the function is bound in each invocation of the function, just like a local variable in a loop: int data[10]; for (int i=0;i<10;++i) { int &r=data[i]; } In each iteration of the loop [...] –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 8 '13 at 14:28
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when a reference created, it has to be bound to something and cannot later on refer to something else.

But when a function argument is passed by reference, well, think it this way, every time the function is called, a different reference is created to the variable passed in.

there's no contradiction, right?

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