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I am tracking if an event has been fired like this:

bool IsFormLoaded;
private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    //Do stuff
    IsFormLoaded = true;
}
private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    //Do stuff
}

But doing this for many events is not elegant so I want a solution that lets me check if any event was fired like this:

bool IsFormLoaded = IsEventFired(Form1_Loaded);
bool IsButton1Clicked = IsEventFired(Button1_Click);
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You are interested on firing event or handling? –  Hamlet Hakobyan Jan 8 '13 at 14:19
    
@scartag So, what? –  Hamlet Hakobyan Jan 8 '13 at 14:22
    
@scartag, the OP isn't looking for an event that is guaranteed to happen, but for a way to find out whether an arbitrary given event has fired. –  O. R. Mapper Jan 8 '13 at 14:23
    
@O.R.Mapper Oh .. my bad .. didn't read the questions properly. –  scartag Jan 8 '13 at 14:23
2  
No, there is no generic way to do this (except handling all events and keeping the score). Better backtrack to why (you think) you need this. –  Henk Holterman Jan 8 '13 at 14:26
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are handling events using designer. You can do it for example in constructor like follows:

this.Load += delegate { IsFormLoaded = true; };
button1.Click += delegate { IsButton1Clicked = true; };

IMO it's more elegant :)

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it also can cause a memory leak when you subscribe to the events of an object that has to be disposed –  Sten Petrov Jan 8 '13 at 14:29
    
@StenPetrov well, why should this be disposed before application exit? –  Vlad L Jan 8 '13 at 14:33
3  
This just makes the Form reference itself so it will not cause any leaks. –  Henk Holterman Jan 8 '13 at 14:34
    
@StenPetrov and in case of ´this´ there is no memory leak possible –  Vlad L Jan 8 '13 at 14:35
    
That said, it's still worth unsubscribing the events once they fire so that you're not executing code you know will do nothing, particularly for events that are likely to be fired a lot in quick succession, such as keyboard/mouse events. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 14:51
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Funny question, seems to me like something you don't want to write over and over again. That's why I would rather go for a single generic component, than a hashset or something like that. Also, since form implementations are normally based on threads, I use a concurrent dictionary.

This solution can be improved in a couple of different ways; most obviously making the handling more generic as well and lack of the 0-parameter handler. I kept it as simple as possible for clearance. Perhaps I'll probably post something more complete on my blog in a couple of days; if I do I'll share the info here.

My solution has 2 parts: (1) a generic hook class and (2) the implementation in the form. Currently the solution is lazy, e.g. I put event handlers at the end, not at the front of the queue. You should be able to fix this by using GetInvocationList or something similar.

The generic hook class basically hooks events and keeps track if an event is called:

public class EventHooks
{
    private class EventHooksEquality : IEqualityComparer<Tuple<string, object>>
    {
        public bool Equals(Tuple<string, object> x, Tuple<string, object> y)
        {
            return x.Item1.Equals(y.Item1) && object.ReferenceEquals(x.Item2, y.Item2);
        }

        public int GetHashCode(Tuple<string, object> obj)
        {
            return obj.Item1.GetHashCode();
        }
    }

    private ConcurrentDictionary<Tuple<string, object>, bool> called =
        new ConcurrentDictionary<Tuple<string, object>, bool>(new EventHooksEquality());

    private abstract class BaseHookHandler
    {
        protected BaseHookHandler(object container, string eventName, EventHooks hooks)
        {
            this.hooks = hooks;
            this.container = container;
            this.eventName = eventName;
        }

        protected string eventName;
        protected object container;
        protected EventHooks hooks;
    }

    private class HookHandler<T1> : BaseHookHandler
    {
        public HookHandler(object container, string eventName, EventHooks hooks)
            : base(container, eventName, hooks)
        {
        }
        public void Handle(T1 t1)
        {
            hooks.called.TryAdd(new Tuple<string, object>(eventName, container), true);
        }
    }

    private class HookHandler<T1, T2> : BaseHookHandler
    {
        public HookHandler(object container, string eventName, EventHooks hooks)
            : base(container, eventName, hooks)
        {
        }
        public void Handle(T1 t1, T2 t2)
        {
            hooks.called.TryAdd(new Tuple<string, object>(eventName, container), true);
        }
    }
    // add more handlers here...

    public void HookAll(object obj)
    {
        foreach (var eventHandler in obj.GetType().GetEvents()) 
        {
            Hook(obj, eventHandler.Name);
        }
    }

    public void Hook(object obj, string eventHandler)
    {
        if (obj == null)
        {
            throw new Exception("You have to initialize the object before hooking events.");
        }

        // Create a handler with the right signature
        var field = obj.GetType().GetEvent(eventHandler);
        var delegateInvoke = field.EventHandlerType.GetMethod("Invoke");
        Type[] parameterTypes = delegateInvoke.GetParameters().Select((a) => (a.ParameterType)).ToArray();

        // Select the handler with the correct number of parameters
        var genericHandler = Type.GetType(GetType().FullName + "+HookHandler`" + parameterTypes.Length);
        var handlerType = genericHandler.MakeGenericType(parameterTypes);
        var handlerObject = Activator.CreateInstance(handlerType, obj, eventHandler, this);
        var handler = handlerType.GetMethod("Handle");

        // Create a delegate
        var del = Delegate.CreateDelegate(field.EventHandlerType, handlerObject, handler);

        // Add the handler to the event itself
        field.AddEventHandler(obj, del);
    }

    public bool IsCalled(object obj, string eventHandler)
    {
        return called.ContainsKey(new Tuple<string, object>(eventHandler, obj));
    }
}

Usage in a class can be done as follows (example):

   public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        hooks.HookAll(this);
        // or something like: hooks.Hook(this, "Load");
        hooks.Hook(button1, "Click");

    }

    private EventHooks hooks = new EventHooks();

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        this.textBox1.Text = 
            string.Format("Load: {0}\r\nClick: {1}\r\nButton click: {2}\r\n",
            hooks.IsCalled(this, "Load"),
            hooks.IsCalled(this, "Click"),
            hooks.IsCalled(button1, "Click"));
    }
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There is no way this is serious... what if the event was fired before your hook was placed? This class should also control the instance of the type it wishes to instantiate so it can look up the events in advance before the object is created and can then at least do some meaningful trickery... this is kinda just wasted effort or a half solution unless you include the code to get events which you don't know about! –  Jay Jan 18 '13 at 12:01
    
Err... call HookAll in the constructor? Your remark holds for all sorts of event binding, regardless whether you do it with "+=" or reflection. –  Stefan de Bruijn Jan 18 '13 at 12:58
    
1) You could have just made a delegate with the same signature and called the function you wanted before invoking the delegate. Your pattern adds nothing. 2) You would have to get the InvocationList and then re-add existing functions. Last you very well could do other nasty things like modify the CLR. –  Jay Jan 23 '13 at 19:54
    
I did make the remark about the invocation list and in case you haven't noticed, I do make a delegate with the same signature. I'm personally a bit confused what your problem is, since the question was if there was a way to know what events were fired - and within the scope of the object I provide exactly that. –  Stefan de Bruijn Jan 24 '13 at 11:32
    
But your example will only work if the events are exposed as public , although you can change the binding flags easily. My problem was just the 'completeness' toted in the answer when in fact its a bit far from complete depending on how you look at it. I am glad the OP found it useful. Regards. –  Jay Jan 25 '13 at 15:24
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Write your own Base Form(deriving from the Windows.Forms.Form), and override the event firing methods to capture if an event was fired or not. By having a base class, you will be able to reuse your event monitoring logic in all your forms.

Here's some example code that you can use. I have used only Loaded event here. You will have to do this for all the events you want to monitor. You can also use enum than using the constants. Hope this helps

        const string OnLoadFired = "OnLoadFired";
        const string OnShownFired = "OnShownFired";
        List<string> eventsFired = new List<string>();

        protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
        {
            if(!eventsFired.Contains(OnLoadFired))
            {
                eventsFired.Add(OnLoadFired);
            }
            base.OnLoad(e);
        }

        public bool IsEventFired(string eventName)
        {
            return eventsFired.Contains(eventName);
        }
share|improve this answer
    
This is still only a list of strings which could be done in any event, no need for const string OnLoadFired = "OnLoadFired"; –  Ashley Medway Jan 8 '13 at 14:40
    
1) I wouldn't use a List here, you should be using a HashSet. 2) Don't store strings, and if you do, at least store the exact name of the event. 3) if you attach an event handler, rather than overriding the event firing method, you can unattach the event handler after it's fired for the first time, which would be worth doing for any event that will fire a lot (i.e. any keyboard/mouse related events). –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 14:49
    
Agreed that this is still list of strings, but cant think of any other way. Doing it at event level makes it unusable if you want to do it in other forms. –  Dhawalk Jan 8 '13 at 14:50
    
@Servy. agree with point 1 and 2. 3 was my first thought as well, but the questioner just need to know if the event was fired. unsubscribing events can create issue in maintenance, when the original developer is not around –  Dhawalk Jan 8 '13 at 14:52
    
@Dhawalk How so? –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 14:54
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Similar to answer from Dhawalk. I did not see that answer before I wrote this.

        private HashSet<string> events = new HashSet<string>();
        private void IsLoaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            // check
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(CheckEvents("IsLoaded", true).ToString());
            // add
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(CheckEvents("IsLoaded", false).ToString());
            // check
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(CheckEvents("IsLoaded", true).ToString());
        }

        private bool CheckEvents(string Event, bool CheckAdd)
        {
            // CheckAdd True to check
            // CheckAdd Fasle to add
            bool result = events.Contains(Event);
            if (!result && !CheckAdd) events.Add(Event);
            return result;
        }
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