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I would like to have a method where the parameter could be Int32 or Single:

void myMethod( ref object x )
{
     //...CodeHere
}

Since C# does not allow me to pass a specialization of object when using out or ref, the solution I found claimed that assigning the variable to a variable of the type object would be enough:

Single s = 1.0F;
object o = s;
myMethod( ref o );

That didn't work. According to the Microsoft documentation I looked at, o should be a pointer to s. The sources I looked at state that assigning non-primitive types generate a reference and not a new instance.

Is it possible to have a method where I can pass Single or Int32 or any other type that is a specialization of object?

share|improve this question
1  
You misread whatever boxing documentation you had in front of you. It generated a boxed instance to a copy of the original value. – Jon Skeet Sep 14 '09 at 14:01
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Overload the method:

void myMethod( ref int x )
{
    //...
}

void myMethod(ref single x)
{
    //...
}
share|improve this answer
    
My first fix to this proble was exactly this, but I thought that should be another way. This problem seems to be specific with Single and related. Complex classes do not suffer from this limitation. Anyway, if no other solution appears, I will use your suggestion. thanks – Flavio Sep 14 '09 at 14:03
    
Flavio: the reason this isn't working the way you think it should has to do with the fact that ints and floats are Value Types, while object is a Reference Type. I suggest you read up on the difference. Here's a nice start ( albahari.com/valuevsreftypes.aspx ), but I suggest you spend an hour or two googling the subject. – Randolpho Sep 14 '09 at 14:27

Unfortunately, you're out of luck. You'll be better off using two methods:

void MyMethod(ref float x)
{
  //....
}

void MyMethod(ref int x)
{
  //....
}
share|improve this answer
    
you were first :) – bohdan_trotsenko Sep 14 '09 at 14:01
    
Actually, Joel beat me by 3 seconds. :) – Randolpho Sep 14 '09 at 14:24

"I would like to have a method where the parameter could be Int32 or Single"

How about using a Generic method instead?

NB: In the current version of C# you can only be able to constrain the allowable types to struct not specific types such as int, float.

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2  
You couldn't constrain the generic parameter to be only int or float though. The closest you could get would be restricting it to struct, which would allow lots of other types to slip in. – LukeH Sep 14 '09 at 14:02
    
Yes that's right, did I hear rumour this is coming in C# 4. – Ash Sep 14 '09 at 14:04

Instead of boxing the value in an object, you could overload the function:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
        }

        static int test = 0;

        static void MyMethod(int arg)
        {
            test += arg;
        }

        static void MyMethod(ref int arg)
        {
            test += arg;
        }

        static void MyMethod(Single arg)
        {
            test += Convert.ToInt32(arg);
        }

        static void MyMethod(ref Single arg)
        {
            test += Convert.ToInt32(arg);
        }
    }
}

What you do with the argument inside the methods is dependent on what you're trying to accomplish, of course.

share|improve this answer

I would probably use Ash's approach and go with a generic implementation along the following lines:

	static void myMethod<T>(ref T value) where T : struct, IConvertible, IComparable<T>, IEquatable<T>
	{
		value = (T)Convert.ChangeType(value.ToSingle(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture) * 2.0, typeof(T));
	}

	static void Main(string[] args)
	{
		int data1 = 5;

		myMethod(ref data1);
		if (data1 != 10)
			throw new InvalidOperationException();

		Single data2 = 1.5f;

		myMethod(ref data2);
		if (data2 != 3)
			throw new InvalidOperationException();
	}
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