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I'm trying to create a header-only C++ library around an external C API. The C API uses void * pointers as handles. Here's the idea:

// resource.hpp
class Resource {
public:
    // RAII constructor, destructor, etc.
    // ...
    void do_something(const Handle & h) {
        do_something_impl( (void *) h);
    }
};

// handle.hpp
class Handle
{
public:
    Handle(size_t n, const Resource & res)
        : p_(res.allocate(n)), res_(res) {}

    // cast operation
    operator void *() const { return p_; }

private:
    void * p_;
    Resource & res_;
};

The problem here is that (a) the Handle has to keep a reference to the Resource, and (b) the Resource needs to be able to cast the Handle to a void *. Unfortunately this leads to a circular dependency.

Any ideas on how to restructure this?

NOTE: The answer is not to simply "include xxx.hpp" or forward declare one of the classes. This needs to be restructured somehow, I just can't quite see how.

Adding a class Handle as a forward declaration to the top of the Resource file doesn't work, because the (void *) cast is part of the Handle definition that Resource still can't see. Likewise, changing the cast to a void * ptr() member function leads to the same problem.

Moving the function definitions to a .cpp file is also not an answer -- it needs to be header-only.

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1  
When to use forward declaration? –  Joe Jan 8 '13 at 14:27
    
On top of using forward declarations make sure you use header guards. –  drescherjm Jan 8 '13 at 14:30
    
@Joe: forward declaration won't work here (see EDIT). –  David H Jan 8 '13 at 14:55

2 Answers 2

Don't include the header files into each other, instead you have a forward declaration the classes. This way they can be used as references or pointers.

So in resource.hpp:

class Handle;

class Resource {
public:
    // RAII constructor, destructor, etc.
    // ...
    void do_something(const Handle & h) {
        do_something_impl( (void *) h);
    }
};

And in handle.hpp:

class Resource;

class Handle
{
public:
    Handle(size_t n, const Resource & res)
        : p_(res.allocate(n)), res_(res) {}

    // cast operation
    operator void *() const { return p_; }

private:
    void * p_;
    Resource & res_;
};

Since you use the void* typecasting operator inside the do_something function, you have to move that implementation into a separate source file. In that source file you can include both header files, so all functions can be accessed.

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@Joachim--In vs2010, this gives "Cannot convert from 'const Handle & h' to 'void *'; Source or target has incomplete type. In other words, Resource can't see the operator void *(). –  David H Jan 8 '13 at 14:52
    
Also, adding class Resource to handle.hpp won't work, because Handle needs to see the Resource.allocate() member function! –  David H Jan 8 '13 at 14:57
    
@DavidH Then you have to include the resource.hpp file in handle.hpp. As long as you don't do the opposite too it's okay. As for the error, it's because you are trying to convert a non-pointer type to a pointer type. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 8 '13 at 15:39
    
@Joachim--The whole point of the conversion operator is specifically to convert the Handle type to a pointer. Can you suggest a different way? A void * ptr() member function would give the same error and cause the same problem. –  David H Jan 8 '13 at 15:41
    
@DavidH Can't you just use the address-of operator to actually get a real pointer? –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 8 '13 at 15:57
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, it's templates to the rescue (AGAIN!):

// resource.hpp
class Resource;
template<typename TResource> class Handle;

class Resource {
public:
    // RAII constructor, destructor, etc.
    // ...
    void do_something(const Handle<Resource> & h) {
        do_something_impl( (void *) h);
    }
};

// handle.hpp
template<class TResource>
class Handle {
public:
    Handle(size_t n, const TResource & res)
        : p_(res.allocate(n)), res_(res) {}

    // cast operation
    operator void *() const { return p_; }

private:
    void * p_;
    TResource & res_;
};
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