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Yesterday I asked this question about using a recursive sub with an argument passed in being the actual desired output and was given the advice of rather making a recursive function with the desired output being the returned value.

The two solutions would look as follows (In this example, to get all the checked nodes beneath a certain node in a treeview returned as a List(Of Treenode):


Recursive Sub:

Sub GetAllCheckedNodes(ByVal tn As TreeNode, ByVal NodesList As List(Of TreeNode))
    If tn.Checked Then NodesList.Add(tn)

    For Each nd As TreeNode In tn.Nodes
        GetAllCheckedNodes(nd, NodesList)
    Next
End Sub

Where the Desired output would be NodesList and hence used as follows:

Dim CheckedNodes as New List(Of Treenode)
GetAllCheckedNodes(MyTreeNode, CheckedNodes)

At which point in time, Checkednodes would be populated.


Recursive Function:

Function GetAllCheckedNodes(ByVal tn As TreeNode) As List(Of TreeNode)
    Dim RetVal As New List(Of TreeNode)

    If tn.Checked Then RetVal.Add(tn)

    For Each nd In tn.Nodes
        RetVal.AddRange(GetAllCheckedNodes(tv, nd))
    Next

   Return RetVal
End Function

Which would be used as follows:

Dim CheckedNodes as List(Of Treenode) = GetAllCheckedNodes(MyTreeNode)

So my questions are:

  1. Obviously, the function seems to be easier to understand, but is there any other reason to use it from a programming point of view?
  2. In the recursive Function, you are declaring a new List(Of TreeNode) with each iteration whereas you are using the same list in the Sub... Wouldn't that make the sub more memory efficient? And, if so, would there be times a recursive sub created as shown above oculd be a better solution for memory management? Or never??

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So the Function is simpler for the calling code, and the Sub performs better. You can have the best of both worlds by doing this:

Function GetAllCheckedNodes(ByVal tn As TreeNode) As List(Of TreeNode)
    Dim output As New List(of TreeNode)
    GetAllCheckedNodes(tn, output)
    Return output
End Function

Private Sub GetAllCheckedNodes(ByVal tn As TreeNode, ByVal NodesList As List(Of TreeNode))
    If tn.Checked Then NodesList.Add(tn)

    For Each nd As TreeNode In tn.Nodes
        GetAllCheckedNodes(nd, NodesList)
    Next
End Sub
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Thanks @Meta-Knight! - Is that regular established good programming practice? I'm just trying to learn what a "Good Programmer" would do in each situation so as to best emulate them... –  John Bustos Jan 8 '13 at 14:59
1  
As far as best practice goes I can't really comment but I have seen and used this set up a couple times and it seems to run efficiently and quickly. –  Mike_OBrien Jan 8 '13 at 15:50
    
This is the type of thing that could cause problems in future development. At a minimum, name the sub something different. Practically, I would prefer using the sub alone for simplicity's sake, if the efficiency is important. –  xpda Jan 8 '13 at 16:59
    
@xpda: Just for the ease of use and readability of the calling code, I prefer to have the two methods (or just a Function if performance is acceptable). You're right about the naming though, I would name the Sub differently, because the Get prefix implies that a value should be returned. –  Meta-Knight Jan 8 '13 at 17:12

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