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Consider these two code samples:

private final Player[] players = new Player[MAX_PLAYERS + 1];
private int playerCount;

public boolean addPlayer(Player player) {
    synchronized (players) {
        for (int i = 1; i < players.length; i++) {
            if (players[i] == null) {
                players[i] = player;
                playerCount++;
                player.setIndex(i);
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
}

public void removePlayer(Player player) {
    synchronized (players) {
        players[player.getIndex()] = null;
        playerCount--;
    }
}

public Player[] getPlayers() {
    synchronized (players) {
        return players;
    }
}

public int getPlayerCount() {
    synchronized (players) {
        return playerCount;
    }
}

and...

private final AtomicReferenceArray<Player> players = new AtomicReferenceArray<Player>(MAX_PLAYERS + 1);
private final AtomicInteger playerCount = new AtomicInteger();

public boolean addPlayer(Player player) {
    for (int i = 1; i < players.length(); i++) {
        if (players.get(i) == null) {
            players.set(i, player);
            playerCount.incrementAndGet();
            player.setIndex(i);
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

public void removePlayer(Player player) {
    players.set(player.getIndex(), null);
    playerCount.decrementAndGet();
}

public AtomicReferenceArray<Player> getPlayers() {
    return players;
}

public AtomicInteger getPlayerCount() {
    return playerCount;
}

Now, I know that accessing an array normally is very efficient. However, I know that synchronization can be costly. On the other side, atomic operations do not need to be synchronized, but I would guess that players.get(i) is not as efficient as players[i]. So, which of these samples would give me best performance if I were to use it in a game setting? I have the server designed so that each new player has a thread dedicated to them. And every time they finish connecting and logging in, they add themselves to the list of players, via addPlayer(Player). When a player disconnects, they remove themselves from the list of players, via removePlayer(Player). Since these operations are invoked from different threads, synchronization is definitely needed. So which should I use?

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1  
What about the bug setting element to null instead of player? –  Bohemian Jan 8 '13 at 14:51
    
My bad.. :) Sorry.. –  Narendra Pathai Jan 8 '13 at 14:51
    
@Bohemian Thanks. I just wrote this up by hand. –  Martin Tuskevicius Jan 8 '13 at 14:54
1  
If you're writing a client-server game, the time used for synchronization will be infinitesimal compared to the time used for communication. Write bug-free code first, in the simplest possible way, then focus on micro-optimizations when they add value. –  parsifal Jan 8 '13 at 15:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Most of these questions on SO can be answered with "have you measured it" and can be very dependent upon your environment. However, whatever solution you choose:

And every time they finish connecting and logging in, they add themselves to the list of players, via addPlayer(Player)

the cost of connecting/logging in etc. across a network will massively dwarf any efficiency you're concerned about.

This assertion:

However, I know that synchronization can be costly

used to be more of a concern. Synchronisation nowadays is substantially less costly.

For the above, I really wouldn't worry about it. Get your solution working, and then determine if the above is sufficiently inefficient to warrant reworking. I see little in the above performance-related to cause me concern.

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Yeah I think everyone is right. This concern over a little thing is a bit silly. Thanks everyone for your input. –  Martin Tuskevicius Jan 8 '13 at 15:07

only option 1 is thread safe.

Option 2 checks if player[i] is null in a non thread safe way.

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How is it unsafe? –  Martin Tuskevicius Jan 8 '13 at 14:56
    
It's not that the check is unsafe, it's that the following .set may be overwriting a non-null player. The thread which checks if it's null could be put on hold and another thread add a value at index i before the first thread calls set. –  Colselaw Jan 8 '13 at 15:01
    
If you change line 7 of the second example to: players.compareAndSet(i, null, player); That should hopefully correct that issue. –  Colselaw Jan 8 '13 at 15:03
    
The check for null is not made within a synchronized block, so it may mot still be null on the next line. Colselaw's compareAndSet idea should fix it. –  Bohemian Jan 8 '13 at 20:46

This is the simplest way to write it

private final List<Player> players = new CopyOnWriteArrayList(); // thread safe

public boolean addPlayer(Player player) {
    return players.add(player);
}

public void removePlayer(Player player) {
    players.remove(player);
}

public List<Player> getPlayers() {
    return players;
}

public int getPlayerCount() {
    return players.size();
}

Note: this won't work

public Player[] getPlayers() {
    synchronized (players) {
        return players;
    }
}

as you won't be able to use the array returned in a safe way. Given you are only accessing a final field, synchronized won't do anything.

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That would work. But I forgot to mention in the description that the ordering of the players does matter. –  Martin Tuskevicius Jan 9 '13 at 15:02
    
@MartinTuskevicius In that case you can use a List –  Peter Lawrey Jan 9 '13 at 15:10

The biggest difference between these two approaches is that one locks on the whole data structure, the other locks on individual elements.It's better to lock one element than it is to lock the whole data structure. The check for null in addPlayers does look like it would be a problem if you have concurrent calls, you could assign multiple players to the same array slot.

You would have better insert performance if you used a ConcurrentHashMap, with no worse locking (since it uses lock-striping). It would also track the counts for you (although it's not guaranteed to be exact).

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