Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Step class and an AutoStep class

class Step {
    int StepNumber;
}

class AutoStep {
    int StepNumber;
}

They are NOT inherited from any class and CANNOT inherit from any class.

I have to sort them by StepNumber and call specific method depending on their type(Step or AutoStep)

How can I do that?

share|improve this question
3  
can you use interface? –  dreamzor Jan 8 '13 at 15:04
2  
Let both classes implement IComparable then you can the standard methods for lists or arrays. –  Mithrandir Jan 8 '13 at 15:04
1  
if an interface isn't an option, you could write a wrapper class. –  juharr Jan 8 '13 at 15:06
2  
@John If you can't change the classes at all you should just say that, as it's entirely different from saying they can be changed but just can't inherit from anything. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 15:18
1  
@John But why can't you change them? Also, next time, it would be best if you said what the task actually is immediately, so people don't suggest approaches that don't work for you. –  svick Jan 8 '13 at 15:18

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is literally what interfaces are made for:

public interface ISteppable
{
    public int StepNumber { get; }
    public void Foo();//the method you need to call; adjust the signature as needed
}

class step : ISteppable
{
    int StepNumber;

    int ISteppable.StepNumber
    {
        get { return StepNumber; }
    }

    public void Foo()
    {

    }
}

class AutoStep
{
    int StepNumber;

    int ISteppable.StepNumber
    {
        get { return StepNumber; }
    }

    public void Foo()
    {

    }
}

Then you can create a collection of ISteppable objects and sort them using their StepNumber property and call Foo on each of them.

Since you can't modify either of the classes you'll need to use the Adapter pattern to create implementations of these interfaces for those types:

public class StepAdapter : ISteppable
{
    private step value;
    public StepAdapter(step value)
    {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public int StepNumber
    {
        get { return value.StepNumber; }
    }

    public void Foo()
    {
        value.Foo();
    }
}

public class AutoStepAdapter : ISteppable
{
    private AutoStep value;
    public AutoStepAdapter(AutoStep value)
    {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public int StepNumber
    {
        get { return value.StepNumber; }
    }

    public void Foo()
    {
        value.Foo();
    }
}

Then you can create a collection of ISteppable objects, and when you would like to add a step object just wrap it in a StepAdapter and wrap all AutoStep objects in AutoStepAdapter objects.

List<ISteppable> list = new List<ISteppable>();

list.Add(new StepAdapter(new step(){StepNumber = 5}));
list.Add(new AutoStepAdapter(new AutoStep(){StepNumber = 3}));

list.Sort((a, b) => a.StepNumber.CompareTo(b.StepNumber));

foreach (var item in list)
{
    item.Foo();
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are completely right, but didn't he say: no inheritance in any way? –  StampedeXV Jan 8 '13 at 15:10
2  
@StampedeXV Which is why I'm not inheriting from anything. Implementing an interface isn't inheriting. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 15:10
    
no interfaces, sorry :( –  Ivan Prodanov Jan 8 '13 at 15:12
    
but +1 for the effort –  Ivan Prodanov Jan 8 '13 at 15:13
1  
@svick You could; it depends on context, and whether you want an in place sort or the creation of a new collection. Without any context it's hard to say which would be best. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 15:31

You can use as to cast them:

Step stepObject = input as Step;

if(stepObject != null)
{
  // do something with Step
}

AutoStep autoStepObject = input as AutoStep;

if(autoStepObject != null)
{
  // do something with AutoStep
}
share|improve this answer

If you have two types that you want to treat the same way, you should somehow create a single type for them.

The best option in this case would be a common interface (or possibly a common base class), but that doesn't seem to be an option for you.

Another way would be to create the interface and two adapters (one for each original type) that inherit from it.

Both options are explained well in Servy's answer.

But yet another option would be to use dynamic. With that, having a property with the same name is enough to use them the same way. But I wouldn't recommend this approach, because it breaks (compile-time) type safety.

For example (using modified code from Servy's answer):

List<dynamic> list = new List<dynamic>();

list.Add(new step{ StepNumber = 5 });
list.Add(new AutoStep{ StepNumber = 3 });

foreach (var item in list.OrderBy(x => x.StepNumber))
{
    item.Foo();
}
share|improve this answer

if you can use an interface the problem is fairly easily solvable:

class step : IStep
{
   ...
   public int StepNumber {get; set;}
}

class AutoStep : IStep
{
   ...
   public int StepNumber {get; set;}
}

interface IStep
{
   public int StepNumber;
}

List<IStep> steps; // list with steps and autosteps
List<IStep> orderedSteps = steps.OrderBy(s => s.StepNumber);
foreach (IStep step in orderedSteps)
{
  if (step is Step)
    // call to method here
  else if (step is AutoStep)
    // call to other method here
}

Alternatively you can perhaps do something with Reflection (not advised due to performance impact).

share|improve this answer
    
If you go through all of the trouble of creating an interface why are you casting them back to their real types to call a method instead of just putting that method into the interface to begin with? –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 15:15
    
Because I don't know the name of the method and it might be different in Step and in AutoStep. –  Bazzz Jan 8 '13 at 15:16
    
The whole point would be that in the interface implementation they can each do whatever they want, including calling any number of other methods within that type. The only reason it wouldn't work is if they had a different signature, and even in that case if the parameters were fixed they could be curried to match the interface signature. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 15:17
    
But the OP says "call specific method depending on their type(Step or AutoStep)", to me this means that the method name is only known as soon as the type is known. Anyway I agree with your points but the OP has sort of limited freedom. :) –  Bazzz Jan 8 '13 at 15:20
    
And the type is known when creating the type, this at the time the interface implementation is defined you know what method is being called. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 15:27

It's definitely not how I would do things without being tightly constrained, but you can have a sort method with the following:

private void sort(object toBeSorted)
{
    if(toBeSorted is Step)
    {
        callStepSort();
    }
    else if(toBeSorted is AutoStep)
    {
        callAutoStepSort();
    }
}

This takes care of checking the type, avoids inheritance, and allows you to call the sort method regardless of type.

But again, without constraints this is not how I would accomplish this at all.

share|improve this answer

Assume that you defined have two lists:

List<AutoStep> autoStepList;
List<Step> stepList;

According to the definition of your classes, the field StepNumber is non-public, so we need to access it through Reflection.

You can add following class to your project:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Linq;

public partial class AnyStepComparer<T>: IComparer<T> {
    int IComparer<T>.Compare(T stepX, T stepY) {
        if(typeof(Step)==typeof(T)||typeof(AutoStep)==typeof(T))
            return (
                from it in new[] { 0 }
                let type=typeof(T)
                let flagsAccess=BindingFlags.Instance|BindingFlags.NonPublic|BindingFlags.Public
                let invokeAttr=flagsAccess|BindingFlags.GetProperty|BindingFlags.GetField
                let binder=default(Binder)
                let args=default(object[])
                let x=(int)type.InvokeMember("StepNumber", invokeAttr, binder, stepX, args)
                let y=(int)type.InvokeMember("StepNumber", invokeAttr, binder, stepY, args)
                select Comparer<int>.Default.Compare(x, y)
                ).First();

        var message="{0} must be either Step or AutoStep";
        var paramName="[T]";
        throw new ArgumentException(String.Format(message, paramName), paramName);
    }

    public static readonly AnyStepComparer<T> Default=new AnyStepComparer<T>();
}

Then define the method in your code:

public static void SortSteps<T>(List<T> steps) {
    if(steps is List<AutoStep>||steps is List<Step>)
        steps.Sort(AnyStepComparer<T>.Default);
}

So that you can sort them by calling:

SortSteps(autoStepList);

or

SortSteps(stepList);

Alternatively, you can sort them in your code directly with:

autoStepList.Sort(AnyStepComparer<AutoStep>.Default);

or

stepList.Sort(AnyStepComparer<Step>.Default);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.