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In the code sample below, I'd like to be able to used the dll object within the helper function.

def HelperFunc():
    # How to use dll here?
    pass

def LoadMyDLL():
    dll = ctypes.CDLL( "libmydll.so" )
    dll.HelperFunction = HelperFunction
    return dll

dll = LoadMyDLL()
dll.HelperFunc()

I can obviously pass it as a parameter to HelperFunc, but is I'm importing this function, faking it is included into the dll, it wouldn't be clean to call dll.HelperFunc(dll) with the dll repetition.

I could also store the dll object into a global variable. I'd then need to add a protection to avoid loading the dll twice, keeping a single dll loaded.

But is there a way to get dll from within HelperFunc, or having it passed silently?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So one thing people often forget (or never learn) is that functions have attributes as well and they're entirely mutable. So you could do:

def LoadMyDLL():
    dll = ctypes.CDLL("libmydll.so")
    dll.HelperFunction = HelperFunction
    dll.HelperFunction.dll = dll
    return dll

But this produces a problem: dll.HelperFunction.dll is HelperFunction.dll. So whatever your last call to LoadMyDLL is, will be the CDLL object that is attached to HelperFunction. If you are not using HelperFunction outside of the context of dll.HelperFunction() then I suggest you do the following: Don't make HelperFunc an attribute of dll, just call HelperFunction(dll) where needed. If you want it to modify dll since Python is pass-by-reference, it will do so. If you don't believe me and want me to post example code, I'll be happy to edit this with an illustration.

Disclaimer In general what you seem to be doing doesn't look right at all to me. If you want to do something like this, I would suggest making a class that stores the CDLL object as self.dll and making HelperFunction a method on the class. Then you can access self.dll from that method. Of course, the design is your decision and I can't see the rest of the code, but the latter just seems more natural to me (and my guess would be, to plenty of others as well).

Edit Just due to the discussion below, I'd like to give an idea as to how I might think of constructing the class I suggested (even though the above was accepted as is).

class DLLHelper(object):
    def __init__(self, static_object=None, helper_function=None):
        self.dll = ctypes.CDLL(static_object or "libmydll.so")

    def HelperFunction(self):
        # do stuff with self.dll

    def OtherRelatedFunction(self):
        # do stuff with self.dll and self.HelperFunction


dll = DLLHelper()
dll.HelperFunction()
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If you call LoadMyDll() exactly once, I don't see a problem... –  glglgl Jan 8 '13 at 15:29
    
@glglgl I don't see him saying he'll only ever call it once. Like I said, if he calls it several times then he will run into the problem I mentioned. And if he abstracts the logic to load arbitrary libraries then he'll run into serious issues. –  sigmavirus24 Jan 8 '13 at 15:34
    
I also thought about doing as you explained in your disclaimer. However, when calling any function of the dll, user will have to call dll.dll.functionToCall(), and more than ugly, it's not convenient. –  Didier Trosset Jan 8 '13 at 15:41
    
If you wrap the dll, just make a method that makes the call for them. Why would they need to access the dll directly? That's the purpose of a class. –  sigmavirus24 Jan 8 '13 at 15:44

To avoid globals you can use a closure or an object with a static method to save and reuse dll.

def LoadMyDLL(dll = ctypes.CDLL( "libmydll.so" )):
    def closure():
        return dll
    return closure

dll = LoadMyDLL()()

and the same for the helper func to use the dll binding:

def HelperFunc():
    dll = LoadMyDLL()()
    # and use the dll

UPDATE

The above answer worked, not because of the closure, but because of the default keyword argument dll in the global function LoadMyDLL.

This default keyword argument (dll = ...) is initialized once, when the function LoadMyDLL is defined as a global function. This means there is a very easy solution :

def LoadMyDLL(dll = ctypes.CDLL( "libmydll.so" )):
    return dll

dll = LoadMyDLL() # get the dll, which has already been initialized 

and in the helper function :

def HelperFunc():
    dll = LoadMyDLL() # get the dll again
    # and use the same dll
share|improve this answer
def HelperFunc():
    HelperFunc.dll.OtherFunction()

def LoadMyDLL():
    dll = ctypes.CDLL( "libmydll.so" )
    HelperFunction.dll = dll
    dll.HelperFunction = HelperFunc
    return dll

dll = LoadMyDLL()
dll.HelperFunc()

would be a way to do it. There surely are better ways, however...

share|improve this answer
    
There are problems with this. See my answer please. –  sigmavirus24 Jan 8 '13 at 15:28

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