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Since the naming of a unit test method makes its purpose more meaningful, is it necessary to add a summary to a unit test method?

Example:

/// <summary>
/// Check the FormatException should be thrown when a give country data line contains a invalid number.
/// </summary>
[TestMethod]
public void FormatException_Should_Thrown_When_Parse_CountryLine_Containing_InvalidNumber()
{
  ...
}
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Anybody else see Skeet answer oddly then delete it almost immediately afterwards? –  Will Sep 14 '09 at 14:17
    
@Will - yes I noticed that too. –  Drew Noakes Sep 14 '09 at 14:19
1  
We are developers. Noticing odd things out of pattern is how our brain works :) –  DVK Sep 14 '09 at 14:22
2  
There's nothing out of pattern with posting an answer, realising you misread the question and deleting it. –  RichardOD Sep 14 '09 at 14:24
1  
This is Skeet we're talking about. He's walking perfection. And, frankly, you should be banned for thinking he's human. The guy's a T10k and he WILL rip your spine out when he tracks you down. –  Will Sep 14 '09 at 14:30

8 Answers 8

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I think the long descriptive name is more important than the XML comment. Since the unit test isn't going to be part of an API, you don't need the XML comment.

For Example:

[TestMethod]
public void FormatException_Should_Thrown_When_Parse_CountryLine_Containing_InvalidNumber()
{
  ...
}

is more useful than:

///<summary>
/// Exception Should Thrown When Parse CountryLine Containing InvalidNumber
///</summary>
[TestMethod]
public void Test42()
{
  ...
}

XML Comments should be used for documenting APIs and frameworks.

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+1 from me. Also I've never seen documentation from unit tests. If the code is well composed it should be self describing. This is typical if you use Composed methods- c2.com/ppr/wiki/WikiPagesAboutRefactoring/ComposedMethod.html –  RichardOD Sep 14 '09 at 14:26

I actually prefer to use the DescriptionAttribute over a summary tag. The reason being that the value of the Description attribute will show up in a results file. It makes failures easier to understand when you're just looking at a log file

[TestMethod,Description("Ensure feature X doesn't regress Y")]
public void TestFeatureX42() {
  ..
}
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This shows in the test list which can be helpful. –  Will Sep 14 '09 at 14:30
    
+1. Yeah that sounds like a good idea. –  RichardOD Sep 14 '09 at 14:35
    
+1 From me too. Naming convention for methods should be kept for all projects, including test ones - what sane reason is to put summary or description in method's name instead of places designed for keeping such data? –  Spook Oct 17 '12 at 6:04
    
Can you comment on how the Test Explorer integrates with the Description attribute nowadays? I know this post is old, but I never knew there was a dedicated description attribute specific to tests, and immediatelly added one to see how it looked. To my surprise, I couldn't see it anywhere. Was the feature removed (in that case, wouldn't the attribute be deprecated?) or am I missing something? –  julealgon Aug 19 at 21:38

Personally, I try to make the tests easy enough to read that documentation would be redundant. I use inline comments within the test method to explain why I'm doing something a particular way, not what I'm doing.

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Not necessary, but if you feel the XML comments add value above and beyond the name of the unit test itself (which looks like to be comprehensive) then you'll be doing other developers a service.

If the summary is essentially a direct duplicate of the unit test method name, then I think this is overkill.

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If you think that it's the best use of your time, do it, otherwise don't. I wouldnt.

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For the example above, I would say that it's not necessary, unless you use a tool that extracts documentation from source (like javadoc or something).

A common rule of thumb is that the code says what you're doing and the comment says why, but since the name is so very verbose (which I think is ok, since no one ever has to type it) I don't think that the comment contributes anything.

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It is necessary to add a summary when the summary can provide more information that can/should be encoded in method name. Please note that when I say "necessary" when referring to any documentation, I mean is "necessary to convey 100% of needed context/detail/nuances to a new coder inheriting the project or to you yourself 5 years later".

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An XML comment is totally unnecessary if you have a descriptive method name. And it's a must for unit-test methods.

You're already on the right track having a descriptive test method name. (Many agile and TDD practitioners believe that a test method should include "should", e.g. as shown in link text this blog post.

Personally, I like method names like this:

MyClass_OnInvalidInput_ShouldThrowFormatException()

But that's merely my personal preference.

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