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I'm new in socket programming under Linux (UNIX) sockets. I found the following code in the Internet, for a tcp-server that spawns a thread for each connection. However it doesn't work. the accept() function returns instantly, and doesn't wait for connection. What am I doing wrong ?

this is the code

int main(int argv, char *args[])
{
    struct sockaddr_in addr;
    int sd, port;

    port = htons(SERVER_PORT);

    /*--- create socket ---*/
    sd = socket(PF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    if ( sd < 0 )
        panic("socket");

    /*--- bind port/address to socket ---*/
    memset(&addr, 0, sizeof(addr));
    addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
    addr.sin_port = port;
    addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;                   /* any interface */
    if ( bind(sd, (struct sockaddr*)&addr, sizeof(addr)) != 0 )
        panic("bind");

    /*--- make into listener with 10 slots ---*/
    if ( listen(sd, 10) != 0 )
        panic("listen")

    /*--- begin waiting for connections ---*/
    else
    {   int sd;
        pthread_t child;
        FILE *fp;

        while (1)                         /* process all incoming clients */
        {
            sd = accept(sd, 0, 0);     /* accept connection */
            fp = fdopen(sd, "wr+");           /* convert into FILE* */
            pthread_create(&child, 0, servlet, fp);       /* start thread */
            pthread_detach(child);                      /* don't track it */
        }
    }
} 
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2  
You're not checking the return value of accept and then if it's -1 you're not checking errno –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 8 '13 at 15:21
    
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/4005067/… –  m0skit0 Jan 8 '13 at 15:24
1  
Ok, lesson learned, don't trust code you downloaded from a web-site. even examples fail often ! –  stdcall Jan 8 '13 at 15:27
    
Fine, but just don't forget to choose the correct answer. –  m0skit0 Jan 8 '13 at 15:56
    
Besides the shadowing of sd, the call to accept() overwrites the listening socket descriptor. As this will work for one call to accept(), it surely won't work in a loop (as shown in the OP's code snippet). –  alk Jan 8 '13 at 18:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are shadowing the sd variable, passing an invalid socket to accept() which causes it to fail immediately.

It will likely return EBADF to signal a bad file descriptor. You would have noticed if you checked the return value in your code.

You should enable more compiler warnings, to catch things like these. With GCC you can use the -Wshadow option to enable such a warning.

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1  
It's not aliasing, it's shadowing. Aliasing would mean to have a variable that points to the same location as the other, and thus wouldn't be errorneous. :) Also, compiler warnings probably won't help, as this is perfect valid and shouldn't produce a warning with -Wall in GCC. –  netcoder Jan 8 '13 at 15:32
    
@netcoder Corrected, thanks. –  unwind Jan 8 '13 at 15:55
    
@netcoder GCC's documentation claims to support such a warning, at least ... –  unwind Jan 8 '13 at 15:57
    
Ah you're right, it's neither part of -Wall, nor of -Wextra though. It has to be specified manually. –  netcoder Jan 8 '13 at 15:59

You're not checking the return value of accept() call. Most likely it's returning an error.

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I check it with a debugger, no error, it returns 5. –  stdcall Jan 8 '13 at 15:22
    
Check unwind's answer. Anyway, you must include that check in your code. –  m0skit0 Jan 8 '13 at 15:23

there's a redefinition of sd variable

int sd;
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Some problems:

1) You are missing a comma on panic("listen")

2) You are declaring "sd" twice (one at main() one at else)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <netinet/ip.h>

#define SERVER_PORT 30000

int main(int argv, char *args[])
{
    struct sockaddr_in addr;
    int sd, port;

    port = htons(SERVER_PORT);

    /*--- create socket ---*/
    sd = socket(PF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

    /*--- bind port/address to socket ---*/
    memset(&addr, 0, sizeof(addr));
    addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
    addr.sin_port = port;
    addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;                   /* any interface */

    bind(sd, (struct sockaddr*)&addr, sizeof(addr));

    /*--- make into listener with 10 slots ---*/
    listen(sd, 10);

    /*--- begin waiting for connections ---*/
    pthread_t child;
    FILE *fp;

    while (1)                         /* process all incoming clients */
    {
        printf("before accept\n");
        sd = accept(sd, 0, 0);     /* accept connection */
        fp = fdopen(sd, "wr+");           /* convert into FILE* */
        //pthread_create(&child, 0, servlet, fp);       /* start thread */
        //pthread_detach(child);                      /* don't track it */
        printf("After accept\n");
    }

} 
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their is a redefinition of variable sd.

int sd; // at line 3 and 26
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