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I have a base class with a method that can be overridden. If I inherit a class from this base class how can I make the method return the inherited type?

Like:

public class ClassA : BaseClass
{
    public override ClassA TestMethod(...)
    {
        // ...
    }   
}

Do I need to provide a type manually to the base class ? Or can I make it provide that type automatically?

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The feature you want is called "return type covariance". C# does not support it. See stackoverflow.com/questions/1319663 for some thoughts on that. Searching stackoverflow for "return type covariance" will yield some other questions and answers that might help you. –  Eric Lippert Jan 8 '13 at 15:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The feature you want has a name; this is return type covariance.

The reasons it is not supported in C# are here:

Why C# doesn't allow inheritance of return type when implementing an Interface

The other answers are all suggesting that you use the C# version of the curiously recurring template pattern to solve your problem. My opinion is that the pattern makes more problems than it solves. See my article on that subject for more details:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/02/03/curiouser-and-curiouser.aspx

A better way to solve this problem is to use this pattern:

abstract class Animal
{
    protected abstract Animal ProtectedGetMother();

    public Animal GetMother()
    {
      return this.ProtectedGetMother();
    }
}
class Cat : Animal
{
    protected override Animal ProtectedGetMother()
    {
      do the work particular to cats here
      make sure you return a Cat
    }
    public new Cat GetMother()
    {
      return (Cat)this.ProtectedGetMother();
    }
 }

The problem is that you cannot override a virtual method with a different return type. So don't. Make a brand new method with a different return type and make the virtual method an implementation detail of the class hierarchy.

This technique is approximately one billion times easier to understand than this Cat : Animal<Cat> "a cat is an animal of cat" nonsense.

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Your (former) colleagues should really consider adding this feature via the compiler generating this pattern as hidden helper methods. People ask for return type covariance constantly and it would make the type system more useful, IMO. The workaround pattern you describe is completely non-intuitive as to what the programmer was trying to do unless you're intimately familiar with it. –  MgSam Jan 8 '13 at 16:55
    
@MgSam: If the language had this feature, I'd use it. It's a nice little feature. But the language design team has considered this feature half a dozen times and rejected it every time. It's simply not compelling enough to cancel some other better feature. I would therefore not hold my breath waiting for the design team to add this to a hypothetical future version of the language. –  Eric Lippert Jan 8 '13 at 17:26
    
@EricLipper Nice one! +1 But after reading your suggestion sure it doesn't make sense to have a 'cat is an animal of cat'. But i think it make sense for a TestRespository : BaseRepository<Test> isn't it the same thing ? Actually i would read it this way.. TestRepository is a base repository which handle Test entities which make sense to me. –  Rushino Jan 8 '13 at 18:56
    
Nevermind, i think i get it. TestRepository is not just a Test entity... so to make it as you said it would be Test is a base repository that handle test entities which doesn't make sense ofcourse. –  Rushino Jan 8 '13 at 19:01

You could use a generic type to do it.

public class BaseClass<T> where T : BaseClass<T> {
    public abstract T TestMethod(...);
}

public class ClassA : BaseClass<ClassA>
{
    public override ClassA TestMethod(...)
    {
        // ...
    }   
}

Why do you need it? Might lead to better suiting answers...

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1  
It's a valid question if you're making fluent methods. For example, you use a new ClassA().TestMethod() expression expecting to get the return value of the constructor. If TestMethod() is not overridden in every class, you have to start casting. –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Jan 8 '13 at 15:26
1  
+1 good solution with generics –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 8 '13 at 15:29
    
@TheodorosChatzigiannakis Thanks for commenting, I edited my question. –  Matthias Meid Jan 8 '13 at 15:31
    
@Mudu Design issues ? Well i have a JsonObjectBase class where i want to provide a method T FromJson and i was wondering if i needed to put JsonObjectBase<T> or there a way to make it so it find the type itself from the inheritance. –  Rushino Jan 8 '13 at 15:36
1  
Note that this version of the curiously recurring template pattern does not actually constrain ClassA to inherit from BaseClass<ClassA>. See blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/02/03/… for my article on why this pattern is often a bad idea. –  Eric Lippert Jan 8 '13 at 16:01

You can do this in a generic way:

public abstract class Base
{
    public abstract T AbstractTestMethod<T>() where T : Base;

    public virtual T VirtualTestMethod<T>() where T : Base, new()
    {
        return new T();
    }
}

public class ClassA : Base
{
    public override ClassA AbstractTestMethod<ClassA>()
    {
        return new ClassA();
    }

    public override ClassA VirtualTestMethod<ClassA>()
    {
        return new ClassA();
    }
}

Using virtual methods behaves not as strict as using abstract methods. Using the abstract way you can force developers to implement the method on their own. Using the virtual way you can tell them something like "meet my constraints and feel free to use the default behaviour".

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Should be where T: Base, new() –  Jon B Jan 8 '13 at 15:31
    
Actually it does not need to define the new() constraint in this example since the base member does not create instances, but of course you can use it together with the default implementation new T(). Updated the question. ;) –  Aschratt Jan 8 '13 at 15:34
    
+1 Using generic methods you can also do a public override ClassA AbstractTestMethod<ClassA>() in ClassB : Base (look at A and B!), which is not possible using my code. May or may not be useful, depends on OP's application. –  Matthias Meid Jan 8 '13 at 15:52

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