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In Java, I have a String[] of filepaths. I need a function to get a String[] back, which contains all Strings that match a specified regular expression.

Does Java have a built-in function for that or will I have to do this myself?

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closed as not a real question by Cerbrus, A--C, Ricardo Alvaro Lohmann, Sam I am, kamaci Jan 8 '13 at 17:19

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1  
Your code would just be a loop building a new array. Is there a problem in writing it? –  dystroy Jan 8 '13 at 15:32
    
You will have to do it yourself. If you are concerned about performance you may even want to look at 3rd party Regex implementations such as jregex jregex.sourceforge.net –  nwaltham Jan 8 '13 at 15:32
    
    
@dystroy no there is no problem, but a built-in function would be neater. Thanks anyway, submit as an answer and I will accept it! –  Camil Staps Jan 8 '13 at 15:35
    
@CamilStaps Java has no array mapping functionality built in. There are many libraries which abstract this process, and it's obviously easy to write your own. –  Dave Newton Jan 8 '13 at 15:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You'll have to do a loop and check string by string

public static void main(String args[]) {
    String[] a = {"1", "a", "b" };
    List<String> b = new ArrayList<String>();
    for (int i=0; i<a.length; i++) {
        if (a[i].matches("(a|b)")) { // matches uses regex
            System.out.println("Match " + a[i]);
            b.add(a[i]);
        }
    }
}

Upvote beggar:

public static void main(String args[]) {
    String[] a = {"1", "a", "b" };
    String [] res;
    List<String> b = new ArrayList<String>();
    Pattern p = Pattern.compile("(a|b)");
    Matcher m;
    for (int i=0; i<a.length; i++) {
        m = p.matcher(a[i]);
        if (m.matches()) {
            System.out.println("Match " + a[i]);
            b.add(a[i]);
        }
    }
    res = (String[]) b.toArray();
}

Cleaner still:

private static String[] getMatches(String[] strings) {
    Pattern p = Pattern.compile("(a|b)");
    List<String> matches = new ArrayList<String>();

    for (String s : strings) {
        if (p.matcher(s).matches()) {
            matches.add(s);
        }
    }

    return (String[]) matches.toArray();
}
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You should compile the regex only once. Do it and add the final building of an array from the arraylist and you'll get my upvote. –  dystroy Jan 8 '13 at 15:42
    
just because I'm really bored –  beder Jan 8 '13 at 15:52

There is no such a function in Java SE to work with String array. But if you worked with file system directly then you could use

    String[] files  = new File("dir").list(new FilenameFilter() {
        @Override
        public boolean accept(File dir, String name) {
            return name.matches(regex);
        }
    });
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One thing I would do is make the string array into a list object.

List<String> listFiles = Arrays.asList(strFiles);

As beder, pointed out, an iterative for loop example would probably be the easiest and safest approach to take.

The only other method using just the standard library is to make an iterator object and remove any elements from the list that don't match.

//Sudo-code
Iterator<String> iterator = listFiles.iterator();
Pattern pattern = new Pattern("foo");
while(iterator.hasNext()){
    String file = iterator.next();
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(file);
    if(!matcher.matches()){
        iterator.remove();
    }
}

Going outside the standard library, you might want to take a look at a few functional programming libraries. Apache-commons, Guava, and lambdaJ are the only ones that come to mind.

A matcher is just a predicate function so you could easily wrap around the higher-order function called filter. This example was written using the apache-commons syntax. How they make predicate and closure objects have some boilerplate to them. If you want something a bit more cleaner, use lambbdaJ since it's built on top of hamcrest.

public class MatchesPattern implements Predicate{
    Pattern pattern;
    public MatchesPattern(String strPattern){
        this.pattern = new Pattern(strPattern);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean evaluate(Object input) {

        if( input instanceof String){
            Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher((String)input);
            return matcher.matches();
        }
        return false;
    }
}

public void foo(String[] strFiles){
    List<String> files = Arrays.asList(strFiles);
    CollectionUtils.filter(files, new MatchesPattern("bar"));
}
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