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In this example I have a main.html template

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
  <title>Backend</title>
  <style>
    html, body {height:100%}
  </style>
</head>
<body>
  <table border="1" width="100%" height="100%">
    <tr>
      <td colspan="2" class="td-header">
        <h1>Google GO</h1>
      </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="td-right-content">
       {{<parsed template from children>}}
      </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td colspan="2" class="td-header">
        <h1>Footer</h1>
      </td>
    </tr>
  </table>
</body>
</html>

The child part would fill the

{{}}

With

<table>   
  <tr>
    <th>
      Name
    </th>
    <th>
      Description
    </th>
    <th>
    </th>
  </tr>
  {{range .}}
    <tr>
      <td>
        {{.Name}}
      </td>
      <td>
        {{.Description}}
      </td>
      <td>
        <a href="/admin/forms/edit/?key={{.Key.Encode}}">Edit</a>
      </td>
    </tr>
  {{end}}
</table>

After it has been parsed in the code of child part. I am doing this to eliminate redundant html and css and to manage the design easily. Thanks all!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A Template object contains a top-level template (here: the parent template) which may reference other templates associated in the same object. Templates have a name used for referencement.

It can be tricky, because when you use the ParseFiles function to create a new object, each template is named using the base name of the file (and it seems to be impossible to change that name). If you have multiple possible children files for a given main, it can be impractical because you usually don't want to give them the same name.

The solution it to manually read the file to a string and then add it to an explicitly named template (a little bit cumbersome IMO, but you can live with it).

main_temp,_ := template.ParseFiles("main.html")

cont_s,_ := ioutil.ReadFile("content1.html")

// add a new associated template to main 
cont_temp,_ := main_temp.New("content").Parse(string(cont_s))

g := Content{"Hi"}
main_temp.Execute(os.Stdout, &g)

(I skipped all the error handling for the example)

Then you can use the {{template}} directive in your parent page:

{{template "content" .}}

(or any pipeline instead of . which is referring to the whole object given to main_temp)

See text/template doc for more details

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