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I have a Base class which acts as an interface to multiple strategies for synchronous event processing. I now want the strategies to process the events asynchronously. To minimize code refactor, each strategies will have its own internal thread for asynchronous event processing. My main concern is how to manage the lifecycle of this thread. The Derived strategies classes are constructed and destructed all around the codebase so it would be hard to manage the thread lifecycle (start/stop) outside of the strategies classes.

I ended up with the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>

#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>

struct Base
{
    virtual ~Base()
    {
        std::cout << "In ~Base()" << std::endl;

        // For testing purpose: spend some time in Base dtor
        boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::milliseconds(1000));
    }

    virtual void processEvents() = 0;

    void startThread()
    {
        if(_thread)
        {
            stopThread();
        }
        _thread.reset(new boost::thread(&Base::processEvents, this));
        assert(_thread);
    }

    void stopThread()
    {
        if(_thread)
        {
            std::cout << "Interrupting and joining thread" << std::endl;
            _thread->interrupt();
            _thread->join();
            _thread.reset();
        }
    }

    boost::shared_ptr<boost::thread> _thread;
};

struct Derived : public Base
{
    Derived()
    {
        startThread();
    }

    virtual ~Derived()
    {

        std::cout << "In ~Derived()" << std::endl;

        // For testing purpose: make sure the virtual method is called while in dtor
        boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::milliseconds(1000));

        stopThread();

    }

    virtual void processEvents()
    {
        try
        {
            // Process events in Derived specific way
            while(true)
            {
                // Emulated interruption point for testing purpose
                boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::milliseconds(100));
                std::cout << "Processing events..." << std::endl;
            }
        }
        catch (boost::thread_interrupted& e)
        {
            std::cout << "Thread interrupted" << std::endl;
        }
    }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    Base* b = new Derived;
    delete b;
    return 0;
}

As you can see, the thread is interrupted and joined in the Derived class destructor. Many comments on Stackoverflow argues that it's a bad idea to join a thread in a destructor. However, I can't find a better idea considering the constraint that the thread lifecycle must be managed through the construction/destruction of the Derived class. Does someone has a better proposition?

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What about making a queue which processes the drived strategies asynchronously. then it is just a matter of adding and removing these objects from the queue. –  mgr Jan 8 '13 at 15:52
    
@mgr: In fact, I use a locked queue to push events to the strategies and the processEvents method just pop (blocking) events from this queue. I removed these details from the example code because it doesn't affect my main concern which is the thread lifecycle. –  Philippe Jan 8 '13 at 16:24
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It is a good idea to release resources a class creates when the class is destroyed, even if one of the resources is a thread. However, when performing any non-trivial task in a destructor, it is often worth taking the time to examine the implications in full.


Destructors

A general rule is to not throw exceptions in destructors. If a Derived object is on a stack that is unwinding from another exception, and Derived::~Derived() throws an exception, then std::terminate() will be invoked, killing the application. While Derived::~Derived() is not explicitly throwing an exception, it is important to consider that some of the functions it is invoking may throw, such as _thread->join().

If std::terminate() is the desired behavior, then no change is required. However, if std::terminate() is not desired, then catch boost::thread_interrupted and suppress it.

try
{
  _thread->join();
}
catch (const boost::thread_interrupted&)
{
  /* suppressed */ 
}

Inheritance

It looks as though inheritance was used to for code reuse and minimizing code refactoring by isolating the asynchronous behavior to be internal to the Base hierarchy. However, some of the boilerplate logic is also in Dervied. As classes derived from Base are already having to be changed, I would suggest considering aggregation or the CRTP to minimize the amount of boilerplate logic and code within these classes.

For example, a helper type can be introduced to encapsulate the threading logic:

class AsyncJob
{
public:
  typedef boost::function<void()> fn_type;

  // Start running a job asynchronously.
  template <typename Fn>
  AsyncJob(const Fn& fn)
    : thread_(&AsyncJob::run, fn_type(fn))
  {}

  // Stop the job.
  ~AsyncJob()
  {
    thread_.interrupt();

    // Join may throw, so catch and suppress.
    try { thread_.join(); }
    catch (const boost::thread_interrupted&) {}
  }

private: 

  //  into the run function so that the loop logic does not
  // need to be duplicated.
  static void run(fn_type fn)
  {
    // Continuously call the provided function until an interrupt occurs.
    try
    {
      while (true)
      {
        fn();

        // Force an interruption point into the loop, as the user provided
        // function may never call a Boost.Thread interruption point.
        boost::this_thread::interruption_point();
      }
    }
    catch (const boost::thread_interrupted&) {}
  }

  boost::thread thread_;
};

This helper class could be aggregated and initialized in Derived's constructor. It removes the need for much of the boilerplate code, and can be reused elsewhere:

struct Derived : public Base
{
    Derived()
      : job_(boost::bind(&Base::processEvents, this))
    {}

    virtual void processEvents()
    {
      // Process events in Derived specific way
    }

private:

  AsyncJob job_;
};

Another key point is that the AsyncJob forces a Boost.Thread interruption point into the loop logic. The job shutdown logic is implemented in terms of interruption points. Thus, it is critical that an interruption point be reached during iterations. Otherwise, it could be possible to end up in a deadlock if the user code never reaches an interruption point.


Lifespan

Examine whether it is the thread's lifetime that must be associated with the object's lifetime, or if it is the asynchronous event processing that needs to be associated with the object's lifetime. If it is the latter, then it may be worth considering using thread pools. A thread pool could provide finer grain control over thread resources, such as imposing a maximum limit, as well as minimize the amount of wasted threads, such as threads doing nothing or time spent creating/destroying short-lived threads.

For example, consider the case where a user creates an array of 500 Dervied classes. Are 500 threads needed to handle 500 strategies? Or could 25 threads handle 500 strategies? Keep in mind that on some systems, thread creation/destruction can be expensive, and there may even be maximum thread limit imposed by the OS.


In conclusion, examine the tradeoffs, and determine which behaviors are acceptable. It can be difficult to minimize code refactoring, particularly when changing the threading model that has implications to various areas of the codebase. The perfect solution is very rarely obtainable, so identify the solution that covers the majority of cases. Once the supported behavior has been clearly defined, work on modifying existing code so that it is within the supported behavior.

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