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class Useless {
    public static boolean b = true;

    public synchronized void u1() {
        try {
            while (b == true)
                wait();
        } catch (InterruptedException i) {
        }
    }

    public synchronized void u2() {
        if (b == true) {
            b = false;
        }
        notify();
    }
}

public class SleepMessages extends Thread {

private Useless u;

    public SleepMessages(Useless u) {
        this.u = u;
    }

    public void run() {
        String importantInfo[] = { "Mares eat oats", "Does eat oats" };
        for (int i = 0; i < importantInfo.length; i++) {
            u.u1();
            System.out.println(importantInfo[i] + " - " + getName());
            try {
                sleep(2000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) throws InterruptedException {
        Useless u = new Useless();
        Thread t1 = new SleepMessages(u);
        t1.setName("t1");
        Thread t2 = new SleepMessages(u);
        t2.setName("t2");
        t1.start();
        t2.start();
        sleep(2000);
        System.out.println("Here they go!...");
        t1.interrupt();
        sleep(1000);
        t2.interrupt();
        u.u2();
        sleep(1000);
        u.u2();
    }
}

The output of this small program gives: Here they go!... Mares eat oats - t1 Mares eat oats - t2 Does eat oats - t2 Does eat oats - t1

My question is why does the thread t2 is the only one that enters the catch(InterruptedException e), and why isn't the result something like this:

Here they go!... Mares eat oats - t1 Mares eat oats - t2 Does eat oats - t1 Does eat oats - t2

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My question is why does the thread t2 is the only one that enters the catch(InterruptedException e),

It looks to me that t1.interrupt() is interrupting the sleep in the run() method. Once you have discarded the InterruptedException there is no way to know the thread was interrupted before.

why isn't the result something like this: Here they go!... Mares eat oats - t1 Mares eat oats - t2 Does eat oats - t1 Does eat oats - t2

Java uses biased locking. This means the last thread to acquire a lock is more likely to acquire the same lock first.

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I've done that, I added a system.out.println on the run method to appear on the console if a thread entered the catch or not and the result was that only the thread t2 entered that catch, t1 is also interrupted and yet, it doesn't enter the catch and gets stuck on sleep.. –  user1798005 Jan 8 '13 at 16:25
    
Did you add a log statement to both catch blocks i.e. in run() as well? –  Peter Lawrey Jan 8 '13 at 16:28
    
yes, I was referring to the catch block in run. Only the the thread t2 enters the catch block in the run method –  user1798005 Jan 8 '13 at 16:36
    
Can you add a log in the catch block in u1? –  Peter Lawrey Jan 8 '13 at 16:39
1  
So basically, both results would be acceptable results? –  user1798005 Jan 8 '13 at 16:55
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There is only one instance of Useless so there is only a single boolean b. Once it is set to true both instances of SleepMessages can leave the wait loop so whichever one happens to get the chance to run will OR both will if more than one CPU is running the threads at the same time.

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When I tested your code, both threads were interrupted without problems, so I'm not sure why you think either one does not enter the catch block.

The exercise seems to be to break from the wait in u1() using an interrupt the first time (triggering a thread to print its first message), and setting the boolean b the second time (triggering the second message).

For the interrupt(), the order is fairly predictable, t1 will get enough time do get to the next call of u1() in the second of sleep that the main thread gets before interrupting t2.

For the u2() part, order is much less predictable. Both t1 and t2 are waiting on the same monitor. The notify() call may wake up either one. The one that wakes up prints its second message, sleeps for a bit more and stops. The second notify() wakes up the one thread left waiting on the monitor.

So the order of the last two messages is indeterminate.

Some final advise : the behavior you seem to want to achieve is probably easier to implement using CyclicBarrier

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