Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

We have an app which optionally integrates with TFS, however as the integration is optional I obviously dont want to have all machine need the TFS assemblies as a requirement.

What should I do?

  1. Is it ok for me to reference the TFS libraries in my main assemblies and just make sure that I only reference TFS related objects when I'm using TFS integration.
  2. Alternatively the safer option would be to reference the TFS libraries in some separate "TFSWrapper" assembly:
    • Is it then ok for me to reference that assembly directly (again as long as I'm careful about whatI call)
    • Should I instead be exposing a set of interfaces for my TFSWrapper assembly to implement, and then instantiate those objects using reflection when require.

1 seems risky to me, on the flip side 2b. seems over-the-top - I would essentially be building a plug-in system.

Surely there must be a simpler way?

share|improve this question
    
"TFS" in this case is "Team Foundation System," right? –  Jeff Sternal Sep 14 '09 at 14:48
    
Yes, but I consider the question to be less about TFS and more with the best way to reference assemblies which might not be present on some users machines. –  Justin Sep 14 '09 at 14:59
    
D'oh, I didn't read the first sentence carefully enough, so I didn't realize that by 'optional' you meant 'may not be present on the user's machine.' –  Jeff Sternal Sep 14 '09 at 15:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The safest way (i.e. the easiest way to not make a mistake in your application) might be as follows.

Make an interface which abstracts your use of TFS, for example:

interface ITfs
{
  bool checkout(string filename);
}

Write a class which implements this interface using TFS:

class Tfs : ITfs
{
  public bool checkout(string filename)
  {
    ... code here which uses the TFS assembly ...
  }
}

Write another class which implements this interface without using TFS:

class NoTfs : ITfs
{
  public bool checkout(string filename)
  {
    //TFS not installed so checking out is impossible
    return false;
  }
}

Have a singleton somewhere:

static class TfsFactory
{
  public static ITfs instance;

  static TfsFactory()
  {
    ... code here to set the instance
    either to an instance of the Tfs class
    or to an instance of the NoTfs class ...
  }
}

Now there's only one place which needs to be careful (i.e. the TfsFactory constructor); the rest of your code can invoke the ITfs methods of your TfsFactory.instance without knowing whether TFS is installed.


To answer recent comments below:

According to my tests (I don't know whether this is 'defined behaviour') an exception is thrown when (as soon as) you call a method which depends on the missing assembly. Therefore it's important to encapsulate your code-which-depends-on-the-missing-assembly in at least a separate method (or a separate class) in your assembly.

For example, the following won't load if the Talk assembly is missing:

using System;
using OptionalLibrary;

namespace TestReferences
{
    class MainClass
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            if (args.Length > 0 && args[0] == "1") {
                Talk talk = new Talk();
                Console.WriteLine(talk.sayHello() + " " + talk.sayWorld() + "!");
            } else {
                Console.WriteLine("2 Hello World!");
            }
        }
    }
}

The following will load:

using System;
using OptionalLibrary;

namespace TestReferences
{
    class MainClass
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            if (args.Length > 0 && args[0] == "1") {
                foo();
            } else {
                Console.WriteLine("2 Hello World!");
            }
        }

        static void foo()
        {
            Talk talk = new Talk();
            Console.WriteLine(talk.sayHello() + " " + talk.sayWorld() + "!");
        }
    }
}

These are the test results (using MSVC# 2010 and .NET on Windows):

C:\github\TestReferences\TestReferences\TestReferences\bin\Debug>TestReferences.exe
2 Hello World!

C:\github\TestReferences\TestReferences\TestReferences\bin\Debug>TestReferences.exe 1

Unhandled Exception: System.IO.FileNotFoundException: Could not load file or assembly 'OptionalLibrary, Version=1.0.0.0,
 Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null' or one of its dependencies. The system cannot find the file specified.
   at TestReferences.MainClass.foo()
   at TestReferences.MainClass.Main(String[] args) in C:\github\TestReferences\TestReferences\TestReferences\Program.cs:
line 11

C:\github\TestReferences\TestReferences\TestReferences\bin\Debug>
share|improve this answer
    
But your saying that its ok if the implementation of the Tfs class lives inside the same assembly? –  Justin Sep 14 '09 at 16:01
    
Using the traditional Windows API, if you link to a DLL which doesn't exist on the end-user machine then your executable won't load at all: and so, instead, you need to use explicit LoadLibrary. I'm not certain that I've tested this, but I don't believe that's true anymore of dotNet references to assemblies which don't exist on the end-user machine ... and so it's safe to have those references in your assembly (there'll be a run-time exception only when/if you try to call the non-existent assembly). –  ChrisW Sep 14 '09 at 16:12
    
That would make TfsFactory depend on the assembly containing Tfs class. And since TfsFactory is used in the application, it will still require to distribute the software with "optional" Tfs dll. :-) –  Sergiy Byelozyorov Aug 12 '13 at 16:02
    
@SergiyByelozyorov I believe (correct me if I'm wrong) that you need the DLL in order to build, but that you can ship/deploy without it ... and that if it isn't present on the target machine, the assembly will still load, and that everything (except the TfsFactory method) will run correctly. –  ChrisW Aug 12 '13 at 16:08
1  
@SergiyByelozyorov Move your Talk-dependent code into a separate method e.g. like this: class MainClass { public static void Main(string[] args) { if (args.Length > 0 && args[0] == "1") { foo(); } else { Console.WriteLine("2 Hello World!"); } } static void foo() { Talk talk = new Talk(); Console.WriteLine(talk.sayHello() + " " + talk.sayWorld() + "!"); } } –  ChrisW Aug 12 '13 at 20:45

You might look at Managed Extensibility Framework (MEF).

share|improve this answer
    
That does look pretty interesting, although possibly a little over the top for what I'm doing at the moment! I'll probably take a look later though. –  Justin Sep 15 '09 at 8:08

A "plug-in" concept may be the way to go, and it may also allow you to (later) extend your application to work with other products than TFS if needed. Option 2a will be just as "risky" (failing when the linked files are missing) as option 1.

You can make an assembly with the required interfaces for your specific purpose, and reference this assembly from both your app and the "TFS plug-in". The latter then provides implementations of your interfaces and uses TFS to perform the operations. The app can dynamically load an assembly and create instances of the plug-in types needed (via Activator etc.) and cast those instances to your interfaces.

In fact, if you make those types inherit from MarshalByRef, you could even load them into another AppDomain and thus make a clean separation of your plugins, and also make them unloadable.

share|improve this answer
    
I am actually trying to implement a plug-in system. However, sometimes I would like to use a type introduced in another assembly. The code using this type will be guarded with an "if" statement that will guarantee that it's only used when the library is available and loaded. Is there a way to do this in C#? –  Sergiy Byelozyorov Aug 12 '13 at 19:08
    
@SergiyByelozyorov, yes this can be done, but only through late binding (e.g. Reflection or dynamic). If the type can implement some interface which is always available it will make it more convenient to use. –  Lucero Aug 13 '13 at 15:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.