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I'd like to create monochrome diagram/graph in octave using plot command. That is why I'd like make different lines of graphs with using line style, for example dashed/dotted/dash-dotted styles. Standard plot suggests several styles for line, but none of them looks like listed variants.


EDIT-1: Standard plot styles are inapplicable for my case: such styles as ":", "-.", "--" don't work, octave draws solid lines in any case. Furthermore, diamonds and squares (d and s options) are ugly and disproportionate big. May be it will be helpful information: I'm using Octave under Windows.


EDIT-2: For example, such command plot(A(:,1),A(:,2),"-.dk") gives me such (inapplicable !!!) figure

enter image description here


More specifically I want something like this (in part of line style) xxx

(Picture from article: McCallum and K. Nigam. 1998. A comparison of event models for Naive Bayes text classification. In Proceedings of AAAI-98 Workshop on Learning for Text Categorization)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

These can be set with the FMT argument of plot. Basically, these seem to be your options (see the manual entrey on line styles):

  • "-" solid lines
  • ":" points
  • "-."dash followed by dot
  • "--" dashed
  • "none" no line (only markers)

There is also the option "." for dots but this is for the actual data points, not the line. So to recreate your picture, something like the following should work

plot (multinominal, "-dk", "MarkerFaceColor", "k")
hold on;
plot (mv-bernoulli, ":sk", "MarkerFaceColor", "k")

The syntax may look a bit strange but here's how to read it. For -dk, - is for solid line, d for diamond shaped marker, and k for black colour (b would be for blue). On :sk, it's dotted line and square shaped marker in black colour.

See the section on the manual for advanced plotting.

EDIT: see the comments below. This may not work in very old versions of Octave.

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2  
thanks for your reply. But actually, as I mentioned above in my question, standard plot styles doesn't applicable for my case: such styles as ":", "-.", "--" don't work, octave draws solid lines in any case. Furthermore, diamonds and squares (d and s options) are ugly and disproportionate big. May be it will be helpful information: I'm using Octave under Windows. –  Andremoniy Jan 9 '13 at 6:55
    
what version of Octave are you using? And what graphics toolkit? Because it works fine for me. If you want to change the size of the marker, see the Marker style section on the manual. Their size can be changed. I'm using Octave 3.6.2 on Debian with fltk for graphics (you can set it with graphics_toolkit fltk but should also work with gnuplot). –  carandraug Jan 9 '13 at 19:15
    
Dear, @carandraug, I'm using Octave-3.2.4 under Windows 7. May be I should update it to newer version? I'll try. Thanks for your advice. –  Andremoniy Jan 9 '13 at 19:17
    
Great! In Octave-3.6.2 this really works! Many thanks! –  Andremoniy Jan 9 '13 at 20:17
1  
@Andremoniy yeah! Octave 3.2.4 is a quite old release now. There's been 8 releases (2 major releases) since then, and there's already a release candidate for the new one. Also, someone downvoted my answer (guessing because of your comment about not working). If it was you, could you please remove the downvote? –  carandraug Jan 9 '13 at 20:53

Well, I found simple decision self (using Google ;)) For gaining monochrome diagram/graph with different style of lines in Octave, we don't need use plot's styles like "--" or "-." (because they do not work).

Just one thing we need is command print. Monochrome figures can be created for example in eps format:

print -deps "diagram.eps"

This gives me quite nice picture:

enter image description here

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