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I've recently read that using the keyword "new" in a constructor is highly frowned upon, but I'm not sure I understand why? For example, how is:

class A {
    public $foo;

    function __construct() {
        $this->foo = new Bar();
    }
}

Any different from:

class A {
    public function someMethod() {
        $foo = new Bar();
    }
}

???

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3  
Where have you read that? There must have been some crucial context. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 8 '13 at 16:49
    
Read up on inversion of control or IOC, also see my answer in that regard. –  mpaepper Jan 8 '13 at 16:54
    
One reason is that it makes your class harder to unit test: how are you going to mock the instance of Bar? –  Mark Baker Jan 8 '13 at 16:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is really the theory behind dependency injection.

It's not that using "new" is a bad idea, per say. Rather, by instantiating objects inside of your class your are creating hard dependencies which can never be changed or switched out without changing the class itself.

It also violates the paradigm of "coding to interface, not implementation"

Example:

class Phone {
    protected $network;

    public function __construct() {
        $this->network = new Verizon();
        $this->network->distinctiveRing();
    }
}

class Verizon {
    public function call($number) {
        ....
    }

    public function distinctiveRing() {

    }
}

Now, suppose one day you wanted to create an ATT, TMobile and Sprint phone? Surely they are all able to make calls, and can do so having just a phone number. Also, the phone class shouldn't care who the carrier is, as it's job is to facilitate entering a number - not to actually make a network connection, right?

So, that being said, we shouldn't have to create a new SprintPhone class that can instantiate another Sprint network object, right? Right.

So what's the better way?

class Phone {
    protected $network;

    public function __construct(NetworkInterface $network) {
        $this->network = $network;
    }
}

interface NetworkInterface {
    public function call($number);
}

class Verizon implements NetworkInterface {
    ...
}

class Sprint implements NetworkInterface {
    ...
}

Well now, you can just say: $phone = new Phone(new Sprint()) or $phone = new Phone(new Verizon())

Also notice that our call to distinctiveRing is gone. Why? Well, because we don't know that any object implementing NetworkInterface will necessarily support a distinctive ring. But this is good because now our Phone can support ANY Network with no code changes.

If you want support for distinctive ring, you can always create a new interface that supports the distinctiveRing method. In your Phone object, you can check if your Network implements DistinctiveRingerInterface and, if so, make your distinctive ring. But you're no longer tied to a specific network with this approach. Better yet, you were forced to do this because you took the right approach from the start.

And, any other network which can feasibly be created later down the road. More importantly, your class no longer has to care about what kind of Network object it's given. It knows, (because it received an object implementing NetworkInterface), that the Network object is able to make a call with a $number.

This also tends to lead to much better code, with a better separation of concerns.

And finally: testing.

With the first example, if you tried to test your Phone object, it was going to make a call on the Verizon network. Sucks to be the person getting called all day because you're running unit tests, right? Right.

Well, simply create a TestNetwork class that implements NetworkInterface, and pass that to your phone object. Your TestNetwork class can do anything you want inside of it's call method - or do nothing.

Furthermore, you can just create a mock object using PHPUnit, and ensure that the call method on your TestNetwork actually gets called. You couldn't do this before because the Network was being instantiated inside of your Phone.

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So, that being said, we shouldn't have to create a new SprintPhone class that can instantiate another Sprint network object. Heh, heh, tell that to almost every mobile carrier out there. –  WaffleStealer654 Aug 31 at 2:22

It seems that your question and your code example do not share too much?

Your first code sample should work, because you assign to a class variable:

class A {
    public $foo;

    function __construct() {
        $this->foo = new Bar();
    }
}

Your second sample assigns it to a variable local to the __construct() method, so you will have no chance of retrieving the value later on:

class A {
    public function someMethod() {
        $foo = new Bar();
    }
}

Besides: Using new is usually fine. However, you might have read about inversion of control or IOC which is a technique to avoid having dependencies and so you would try to avoid the creation of classes directly in the constructor, see for example http://ralphschindler.com/2011/05/18/learning-about-dependency-injection-and-php

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In first example $foo is available in any method in this class and also outside the object
so you can do:

$a = new A();
$a->foo->sth;

In second example $foo is available only inside someMethod.

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Don't think that really answers why instantiating a new object in a constructor would be frowned upon. Not sure I can think of any reason why it would be either... –  Jon Stirling Jan 8 '13 at 16:54
    
@JonStirling Because of Inversion of Control, see below in my answer. –  mpaepper Jan 8 '13 at 16:58
    
@mpaepper Yeah, just been reading it, interesting read. –  Jon Stirling Jan 8 '13 at 17:00

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