Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm rewriting an ancient VB6 program in C# (.Net Framework 4.0). It communicates with a piece of industrial equipment on the factory floor. VB6 used some old COM-based socket software; I'm using the .Net Socket class.

When I send a message to the equipment I expect a response back so I know to listen for one then. But the equipment can also send messages asynchronously without warning (say, to indicate a failure or problem). So I always have to receive those. So what I'd really like is an event handler that gets called whenever anything comes in from the equipment.

The Socket class seems to use a BeginReceive/EndReceive scheme for receive event handling. Can I just do a BeginReceive once at the start of my program to define an event-handler for all incoming messages, or do I have to constantly be doing BeginReceive/EndReceive's throughout my program?

Thanks in advance for clarifying the correct way to do this.

share|improve this question
    
I haven't tried anything yet because I'm trying to understand how the Socket class intends events like this to be handled. Unless I'm misreading it the MSDN makes it seem like you're expected to call BeginReceive anew each time, whereas I'm looking for an event handler that I declare once and events just keep coming in on it as long as I'm connected. Is there such a thing with the Socket class? –  user316117 Jan 8 '13 at 18:36
    
No idea why this had been downvoted: It's so well written that the provided answer not only solves this, but also my problem I was about to post. –  Mark May 26 '14 at 6:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Are you the Server?

If you are the server, you will listen for a socket connection and then accept the socket connection and store it. You will then call BeginReceive with the stored socket. In the BeginReceive method, you will provide a callback function to receive and handle the data.

Once you receive data, the callback happens. The callback function will call EndReceive on the stored connection. This is where you get/handle the data. You will also call BeginReceive again to wait for more data.

This way,the BeginReceive and EndReceive will run in a circle, you are always receiving data and waiting for more data.

Here is an example: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fx6588te.aspx

void waitForData(SocketState state)
    {
        try
        {
            state.Socket.BeginReceive(state.DataBuffer, 0, state.DataBuffer.Length, SocketFlags.None, new AsyncCallback(readDataCallback), state);
        }
        catch (SocketException se)
        {
            //Socket has been closed  
            //Close/dispose of socket
        }
    }

    public void readDataCallback(IAsyncResult ar)
    {
        SocketState state = (SocketState)ar.AsyncState;
        try
        {
            // Read data from the client socket.
            int iRx = state.Socket.EndReceive(ar);

            //Handle Data....

            waitForData(state);
        }
        catch (ObjectDisposedException)
        {
            //Socket has been closed  
            //Close/dispose of socket
        }
        catch (SocketException se)
        {
            //Socket exception
            //Close/dispose of socket
        }
    }

EDIT: As per your comment, here is an example of a C# asychrnous client: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bbx2eya8.aspx.

The BeginReceive/EndReceive work similar to the server.

share|improve this answer
    
Is BeginReceive also called inside the callback function? What is the purpose of calling EndReceive? Isn't the callback function reentrant? If I call EndReceive then do some stuff then call BeginReceive again what happens to data that comes in while I'm doing the stuff? –  user316117 Jan 8 '13 at 18:46
    
Yes, BeginReceive is called in the callback function. EndRecieve will get the data from the receive. In your callback: You call EndReceive, then handle data and then call BeginReceive. –  Mausimo Jan 8 '13 at 18:58
    
re "Are you the server?" The PC initiates the connection, the equipment just listens for one, although both the PC and factory equipment can initiate data transmission without being prompted by the other. So I think that makes the PC the client. –  user316117 Jan 8 '13 at 19:01
    
I added an example of a simple beginReceive/EndReceive –  Mausimo Jan 8 '13 at 19:05
1  
The C# code that I am explaining and the examples linked are for asynchronous sockets. Your must use BeginReceive/EndReceive to perform the socket operations asynchronously. If you do not want to use asynchronous sockets then you could use sychronous sockets: msdn.microsoft.com/en-ca/library/kb5kfec7.aspx. –  Mausimo Jan 8 '13 at 19:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.