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I need help building a Linq query. I have this dictionary :

var dict = new Dictionary<string, IDictionary<int, double>>  
{  
    { "one", new Dictionary<int, double>  
        {  
            { 1, 2.0 },  
            { 2, 3.0 }  
        }},  
    { "two", new Dictionary<int, double>  
        {  
            { 1, 3.0 },  
            { 2, 4.0 },  
            { 3, 5.0 }  
        }},  
    { "three", new Dictionary<int, double>  
        {  
            { 1, 4.0 },  
            { 2, 5.0}  
        }}  
    };  

I want to select all "string"/"int" tuples whose associated value is 3.0. With Foreach loops, it looks like :

var res = new Dictionary<string, int>();
foreach (var elem in dict.Select (d => new { S = d.Key, I = d.Value }))
{
    foreach (var val in elem.I)
    {
        if (val.Value == 3.0)
        {
            res.Add(elem.S, val.Key);
        }
    }
}

I'm trying to do the same with a single Linq query but with no success (I don't know how to "join" the key with the value from a subquery). How would you do this?

Thank you in advance!

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1  
what should the result data look like? e.g. { "one", new int[] { 2 } } or { "one", 2 } –  Kasey Speakman Jan 8 '13 at 17:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could do it this way:

var result = dict
    // flatten to 3-value tuple
    .SelectMany(kvp => kvp.Value
        .Select(kvp2 => new // anonymous object
        {
            OuterKey = kvp.Key, // e.g. "one"
            InnerKey = kvp2.Key, // e.g. 1
            InnerValue = kvp2.Value // e.g. 2.0
        })
    ).Where(o => o.InnerValue == 3.0) // limit to the 3.0 value
    .ToDictionary(o => o.OuterKey, o => o.InnerKey)
    ;

The SelectMany flattens the dictionary of dictionaries into a structure that looks like this:

{ OuterKey = "one", InnerKey = 1, InnerValue = 2.0 },
{ OuterKey = "one", InnerKey = 2, InnerValue = 3.0 },
{ OuterKey = "two", InnerKey = 1, InnerValue = 3.0 },
{ OuterKey = "two", InnerKey = 2, InnerValue = 4.0 },
{ OuterKey = "two", InnerKey = 3, InnerValue = 5.0 },
{ OuterKey = "three", InnerKey = 1, InnerValue = 4.0 },
{ OuterKey = "three", InnerKey = 2, InnerValue = 5.0 }

The Where() limits it down to just the objects with InnerValue = 3.0:

{ OuterKey = "one", InnerKey = 2, InnerValue = 3.0 },
{ OuterKey = "two", InnerKey = 1, InnerValue = 3.0 }

The ToDictionary() looks like this:

{ "one", 2 },
{ "two", 1 }

If it's possible for there to be more than a single 3.0 under the same outer key, then you can use ToLookup() instead of ToDictionary().

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your explanation! I didn't think of the Select(kvp2) inside the SelectMany and so only retrieved the InnerKey and InnerValue. –  L. Ventre Jan 9 '13 at 11:08
    
@GwynnBliedd your edit did provide more efficient code, but it invalidated my explanation of how the LINQ query worked. Part of the answer was instructional. –  Kasey Speakman Jan 9 '13 at 17:43

Here's another butt-ugly way to do it:

var results = from key1 in dict.Keys
              let valueDict = dict[key1]
              from key2 in valueDict.Keys
              where valueDict[key2] == 3d
              select new { Key1 = key1, Key2 = key2 };
share|improve this answer
    
Just need to add a ToDictionary to the end. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 17:18
    
Thank you : I'm not used with this way to write queries but it looks so simple and clear! –  L. Ventre Jan 9 '13 at 11:15

This would do the trick:

var  res = dict
        .Where(outer => outer.Value.Any(inner => inner.Value == 3.0))
        .ToDictionary(outer => outer.Key, outer => outer.Value.First(x=>x.Value == 3.0).Key);

or to make the code a bit more generic:

var predicate = new Func<KeyValuePair<int, double>, bool>(inner => inner.Value == 3.0); 
var  res = dict
        .Where(outer => outer.Value.Any(inner => predicate(inner)))
        .ToDictionary(outer => outer.Key, outer => outer.Value.First(inner => predicate(inner)).Key);
share|improve this answer
    
This will select the int value from the inner dictionary, not the string value from the outer dictionary. –  D Stanley Jan 8 '13 at 17:17
    
Looks like this needs a ToDictionary call on the end to bring it in line with the OP's code. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 17:17
    
@DStanley It would also need a Select after the Where to capture that value. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 17:17
    
I left that out, because that would result in an ArgumentException if there were two identical keys present in the inner dictionaries... –  Spontifixus Jan 8 '13 at 17:18
    
@Spontifixus DictinctBy to the rescue! (if only they had included it in LINQ itself; it's quite useful). –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 17:19

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