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In C++, why does a bool require one byte to store true or false where just one bit is enough for that, like 0 for false and 1 for true? (Why does Java also require one byte?)

Secondly, how much safer is it to use the following?

struct Bool {
    bool trueOrFalse : 1;
};

Thirdly, even if it is safe, is the above field technique really going to help? Since I have heard that we save space there, but still compiler generated code to access them is bigger and slower than the code generated to access the primitives.

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20  
Worrying about individual bytes in 2013 doesn't make sense, unless you have billions of them. –  Almo Jan 8 '13 at 17:30
34  
The smallest addressable storage unit is a byte, this is why a boolean uses a whole byte. –  fge Jan 8 '13 at 17:30
4  
It is faster and more easily addressable to use byte –  user814628 Jan 8 '13 at 17:30
4  
Note that even an empty struct has a size of 1 byte. –  leemes Jan 8 '13 at 17:34
5  
On top of eveything else, an atomic, interlocked operation is not sensibly feasible with 1-bit booleans. Modifying bits would require an expensive kernel lock to change a single boolean state. –  Martin James Jan 8 '13 at 17:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 84 down vote accepted

Why does a bool require one byte to store true or false where just one bit is enough

Because every object in C++ must be individually addressable* (that is, you must be able to have a pointer to it). You cannot address an individual bit (at least not on conventional hardware).

How much safer is it to use the following?

It's "safe", but it doesn't achieve much.

is the above field technique really going to help?

No, for the same reasons as above ;)

but still compiler generated code to access them is bigger and slower than the code generated to access the primitives.

Yes, this is true. On most platforms, this requires accessing the containing byte (or int or whatever), and then performing bit-shifts and bit-mask operations to access the relevant bit.


If you're really concerned about memory usage, you can use a std::bitset in C++ or a BitSet in Java, which pack bits.


* With a few exceptions.

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3  
We C++ folk should link in Java more often! –  GManNickG Jan 8 '13 at 18:16
17  
@Thomas Do you remember the 4GB RAM limitations on 32bit systems? Say hello to the 500MB RAM limitation for 32bit systems with the smallest addressable unit being a bit :) –  s3rius Jan 8 '13 at 19:11
2  
@Thomas It would look like the Intel 8051. –  DJClayworth Jan 8 '13 at 22:17
3  
Not every object in C++ must be individually addressable. Bitfields for instance are not addressable, and the first element of a class has the same address than the class that contains it so it is addressable but not individually. –  K-ballo Jan 8 '13 at 23:35
5  
@DietrichEpp: Yes, they are. See 1.8/5: "Unless it is a bit-field (9.6), a most derived object shall have a non-zero size and shall occupy one or more bytes of storage." –  K-ballo Jan 8 '13 at 23:40

Using a single bit is much slower and much more complicated to allocate. In C/C++ there is no way to get the address of one bit so you wouldn't be able to do &trueOrFalse as a bit.

Java has a BitSet and EnumSet which both use bitmaps. If you have very small number it may not make much difference. e.g. objects have to be atleast byte aligned and in HotSpot are 8 byte aligned (In C++ a new Object can be 8 to 16-byte aligned) This means saving a few bit might not save any space.

In Java at least, Bits are not faster unless they fit in cache better.

public static void main(String... ignored) {
    BitSet bits = new BitSet(4000);
    byte[] bytes = new byte[4000];
    short[] shorts = new short[4000];
    int[] ints = new int[4000];

    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        long bitTime = timeFlip(bits) + timeFlip(bits);
        long bytesTime = timeFlip(bytes) + timeFlip(bytes);
        long shortsTime = timeFlip(shorts) + timeFlip(shorts);
        long intsTime = timeFlip(ints) + timeFlip(ints);
        System.out.printf("Flip time bits %.1f ns, bytes %.1f, shorts %.1f, ints %.1f%n",
                bitTime / 2.0 / bits.size(), bytesTime / 2.0 / bytes.length,
                shortsTime / 2.0 / shorts.length, intsTime / 2.0 / ints.length);
    }
}

private static long timeFlip(BitSet bits) {
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0, len = bits.size(); i < len; i++)
        bits.flip(i);
    return System.nanoTime() - start;
}

private static long timeFlip(short[] shorts) {
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0, len = shorts.length; i < len; i++)
        shorts[i] ^= 1;
    return System.nanoTime() - start;
}

private static long timeFlip(byte[] bytes) {
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0, len = bytes.length; i < len; i++)
        bytes[i] ^= 1;
    return System.nanoTime() - start;
}

private static long timeFlip(int[] ints) {
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0, len = ints.length; i < len; i++)
        ints[i] ^= 1;
    return System.nanoTime() - start;
}

prints

Flip time bits 5.0 ns, bytes 0.6, shorts 0.6, ints 0.6

for sizes of 40000 and 400K

Flip time bits 6.2 ns, bytes 0.7, shorts 0.8, ints 1.1

for 4M

Flip time bits 4.1 ns, bytes 0.5, shorts 1.0, ints 2.3

and 40M

Flip time bits 6.2 ns, bytes 0.7, shorts 1.1, ints 2.4
share|improve this answer
1  
Not sure the speed issue is so clear. E.g. vector<bool> does bit-packing and is typical much faster than using vector<char> storing 0 or 1. –  user515430 Jan 8 '13 at 17:52
4  
@user515430 AFAIK it would only be much faster if the bits fit into cache but the chars do not. To do the bit packing/unpacking takes extra work which the chars don't have to do. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 8 '13 at 18:00
1  
You are overlooking what happens at the other end of order of magnitudes wrt memory. If your vector<bool> fits into RAM or generates fewer page faults you win big. Try to implement Jon Bentley's sorting of 800-numbers in Programming Pearls Column 1. –  user515430 Jan 8 '13 at 19:20
    
With Java you run into the problem that collections & arrays cannot have more than 2 billion. In bits this is only 256 MB which trivial these days. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 8 '13 at 20:25

If you want to store only one bit of information, there is nothing more compact than a char, which is the smallest addressable memory unit in C/C++. (Depending on the implementation, a bool might have the same size as a char but it is allowed to be bigger.)

A char is guaranteed by the C standard to hold at least 8 bits, however, it can also consist of more. The exact number is available via the CHAR_BIT macro defined in limits.h (in C) or climits (C++). Today, it is most common that CHAR_BIT == 8 but you cannot rely on it (see here). It is guaranteed to be 8, however, on POSIX compliant systems and on Windows.

Though it is not possible to reduce the memory footprint for a single flag, it is of course possible to combine multiple flags. Besides doing all bit operations manually, there are some alternatives:

  • If you know the number of bits at compile time
    1. bitfields (as in your question). But beware, the ordering of fields is not guaranteed, which may result in portability issues.
    2. std::bitset
  • If you know the size only at runtime
    1. boost::dynamic_bitset
    2. If you have to deal with large bitvectors, take a look at the BitMagic library. It supports compression and is heavily tuned.

As others have pointed out already, saving a few bits is not always a good idea. Possible drawbacks are:

  1. Less readable code
  2. Reduced execution speed because of the extra extraction code.
  3. For the same reason, increases in code size, which may outweigh the savings in data consumption.
  4. Hidden synchronization issues in multithreaded programs. For example, flipping two different bits by two different threads may result in a race condition. In contrast, it is always safe for two threads to modify two different objects of primitive types (e.g., char).

Typically, it makes sense when you are dealing with huge data because then you will benefit from less pressure on memory and cache.

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1  
A char is the smallest type which C/C++ are guaranteed to make available. Some compilers may make smaller types available, with or without restrictions. I remember one chip which was designed for graphics in which all addresses were bit addresses, so incrementing a char* would require adding 8 to the value represented by the pointer. Reading a char from an unaligned address which wasn't cached would be slower than reading from an aligned address, but wouldn't take any extra instructions. Further, many smaller micros have efficient bit-test/set/clear instructions, and... –  supercat Jan 9 '13 at 5:10
    
...compilers for those micros often offer efficient ways of using them, even though the compilers cannot generally access such things via pointers. –  supercat Jan 9 '13 at 5:11

If you really want to use 1 bit, you can use a char to store 8 booleans, and bitshift to get the value of the one you want. I doubt it will be faster, and it's probably going to gives you a lot of headaches working that way, but technically it's possible.

On a side note, an attempt like this could prove useful for systems that don't have a lot of memory available for variables but do have some more processing power then what you need. I highly doubt you will ever need it though.

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Good one... I also thought that :) Thanks! –  Sam Jan 8 '13 at 18:21
    
I "programmed" with a certain software where the only thing remotely like a variable was an event, which basically is a bool ofcourse. I tried to implement a scoring system in my application there and I used 8 events and flipped them on and off to simulate a char :P. That's why I thought of this now, it reminded me of that hell xD –  Kevin Jan 8 '13 at 18:23
1  
char does not have to be 8 bits in ANSI C. See CHAR_BIT from limits.h –  Michał Šrajer Jan 8 '13 at 19:28
1  
@MichałŠrajer And in Java, char is 16 bits :) –  FredOverflow Jan 8 '13 at 19:54
1  
@user814628 There were plans to either remove the specialization or leave it but deprecate the use of vector<bool>. As it seems, neither of it was executed in C++11. I don't know what the future plans are. Source (Boost about vector<bool>): boost.org/doc/libs/1_52_0/doc/html/container/… –  Philipp Claßen Jan 9 '13 at 0:21

Why don't you just store the state to a byte? Haven't actually tested the below, but it should give you an idea. You can even utilize a short or an int for 16 or 32 states. I believe I have a working JAVA example as well. I'll post this when I find it.

__int8 state = 0x0;

bool getState(int bit)
{
  return (state & (1 << bit)) != 0x0;
}

void setAllOnline(bool online)
{
  state = -online;
}

void reverseState(int bit)
{
   state ^= (1 << bit);
}

Alright here's the JAVA version. I've stored it to an Int value since. If I remember correctly even using a byte would utilize 4 bytes anyways. And this obviously isn't be utilized as an array.

public class State
{
    private int STATE;

    public State() { 
        STATE = 0x0;
    }

    public State(int previous) { 
        STATE = previous;
    }


   /*
    * @Usage - Used along side the #setMultiple(int, boolean);
    * @Returns the value of a single bit.
    */
    public static int valueOf(int bit)
    {
        return 1 << bit;
    }


   /*
    * @Usage - Used along side the #setMultiple(int, boolean);
    * @Returns the value of an array of bits.
    */
    public static int valueOf(int... bits)
    {
        int value = 0x0;
        for (int bit : bits)
            value |= (1 << bit);
        return value;
    }


   /*
    * @Returns the value currently stored or the values of all 32 bits.
    */
    public int getValue() 
    {
        return STATE;
    }

   /*
    * @Usage - Turns all bits online or offline.
    * @Return - <TRUE> if all states are online. Otherwise <FALSE>.
    */
    public boolean setAll(boolean online)
    {
        STATE = online ? -1 : 0;
        return online;
    }


   /*
    * @Usage - sets multiple bits at once to a specific state.
    * @Warning - DO NOT SET BITS TO THIS! Use setMultiple(State.valueOf(#), boolean);
    * @Return - <TRUE> if states were set to online. Otherwise <FALSE>.
    */
    public boolean setMultiple(int value, boolean online)
    {
        STATE |= value;
        if (!online)
            STATE ^= value;
        return online;
    }


   /*
    * @Usage - sets a single bit to a specific state.
    * @Return - <TRUE> if this bit was set to online. Otherwise <FALSE>.
    */
    public boolean set(int bit, boolean online)
    {
        STATE |= (1 << bit);
        if(!online)
            STATE ^= (1 << bit);
        return online;
    }


   /*
    * @return = the new current state of this bit.
    * @Usage = Good for situations that are reversed.
    */
    public boolean reverse(int bit)
    {
        return (STATE ^= (1 << bit)) == (1 << bit);
    }


   /*
    * @return = <TRUE> if this bit is online. Otherwise <FALSE>.
    */
    public boolean online(int bit)
    {
        int value = 1 << bit;
        return (STATE & value) == value;        
    }


   /*
    * @return = a String contains full debug information.
    */
    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        sb.append("TOTAL VALUE: ");
        sb.append(STATE);
        for (int i = 0; i < 0x20; i++)
        {
            sb.append("\nState(");
            sb.append(i);
            sb.append("): ");
            sb.append(online(i));
            sb.append(", ValueOf: ");
            sb.append(State.valueOf(i));
        }
        return sb.toString();
    }
}

Also I should point out that you really shouldn't utilize a special class for this, but to just have the variable stored within the class that'll be most likely utilizing it. If you plan to have 100's or even 1000's of Boolean values consider an array of bytes.

E.g. the below example.

boolean[] states = new boolean[4096];

can be converted into the below.

int[] states = new int[128];

Now you're probably wondering how you'll access index 4095 from a 128 array. So what this is doing is if we simplify it. The 4095 is be shifted 5 bits to the right which is technically the same as divide by 32. So 4095 / 32 = rounded down (127). So we are at index 127 of the array. Then we perform 4095 & 31 which will cast it to a value between 0 and 31. This will only work with powers of two minus 1. E.g. 0,1,3,7,15,31,63,127,255,511,1023, etc...

So now we can access the bit at that position. As you can see this is very very compact and beats having 4096 booleans in a file :) This will also provide a much faster read/write to a binary file. I have no idea what this BitSet stuff is, but it looks like complete garbage and since byte,short,int,long are already in their bit forms technically you might as well use them as is. Then creating some complex class to access the individual bits from memory which is what I could grasp from reading a few posts.

boolean getState(int index)
{
    return (states[index >> 5] & 1 << (index & 0x1F)) != 0x0;
}

Further information...

Basically if the above was a bit confusing here's a simplified version of what's happening.

The types "byte", "short", "int", "long" all are data types which have different ranges.

You can view this link: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/s3f49ktz(v=vs.80).aspx

To see the data ranges of each.

So a byte is equal to 8 bits. So an int which is 4 bytes will be 32 bits.

Now there isn't any easy way to perform some value to the N power. However thanks to bit shifting we can simulate it somewhat. By performing 1 << N this equates to 1 * 2^N. So if we did 2 << 2^N we'd be doing 2 * 2^N. So to perform powers of two always do "1 << N".

Now we know that a int will have 32 bits so can use each bits so we can just simply index them.

To keep things simple think of the "&" operator as a way to check if a value contains the bits of another value. So let's say we had a value which was 31. To get to 31. we must add the following bits 0 through 4. Which are 1,2,4,8, and 16. These all add up to 31. Now when we performing 31 & 16 this will return 16 because the bit 4 which is 2^4 = 16. Is located in this value. Now let's say we performed 31 & 20 which is checking if bits 2 and 4 are located in this value. This will return 20 since both bits 2 and 4 are located here 2^2 = 4 + 2^4 = 16 = 20. Now let's say we did 31 & 48. This is checking for bits 4 and 5. Well we don't have bit 5 in 31. So this will only return 16. It will not return 0. So when performing multiple checks you must check that it physically equals that value. Instead of checking if it equals 0.

The below will verify if an individual bit is at 0 or 1. 0 being false, and 1 being true.

bool getState(int bit)
{
    return (state & (1 << bit)) != 0x0;
}

The below is example of checking two values if they contain those bits. Think of it like each bit is represented as 2^BIT so when we do

I'll quickly go over some of the operators. We've just recently explained the "&" operator slightly. Now for the "|" operator.

When performing the following

int value = 31;
value |= 16;
value |= 16;
value |= 16;
value |= 16;

The value will still be 31. This is because bit 4 or 2^4=16 is already turned on or set to 1. So performing "|" returns that value with that bit turned on. If it's already turned on no changes are made. We utilize "|=" to actually set the variable to that returned value.

Instead of doing -> "value = value | 16;". We just do "value |= 16;".

Now let's look a bit further into how the "&" and "|" can be utilized.

/*
 * This contains bits 0,1,2,3,4,8,9 turned on.
 */
const int CHECK = 1 | 2 | 4 | 8 | 16 | 256 | 512;

/*
 * This is some value were we add bits 0 through 9, but we skip 0 and 8.
 */
int value = 2 | 4 | 8 | 16 | 32 | 64 | 128 | 512;

So when we perform the below code.

int return_code = value & CHECK;

The return code will be 2 + 4 + 8 + 16 + 512 = 542

So we were checking for 799, but we recieved 542 This is because bits o and 8 are offline we equal 256 + 1 = 257 and 799 - 257 = 542.

The above is great great great way to check if let's say we were making a video game and wanted to check if so and so buttons were pressed if any of them were pressed. We could simply check each of those bits with one check and it would be so many times more efficient than performing a Boolean check on every single state.

Now let's say we have Boolean value which is always reversed.

Normally you'd do something like

bool state = false;

state = !state;

Well this can be done with bits as well utilizing the "^" operator.

Just as we performed "1 << N" to choose the whole value of that bit. We can do the same with the reverse. So just like we showed how "|=" stores the return we will do the same with "^=". So what this does is if that bit is on we turn it off. If it's off we turn it on.

void reverseState(int bit)
{
   state ^= (1 << bit);
}

You can even have it return the current state. If you wanted it to return the previous state just swap "!=" to "==". So what this does is performs the reversal then checks the current state.

bool reverseAndGet(int bit)
{
    return ((state ^= (1 << bit)) & (1 << bit)) != 0x0;
}

Storing multiple non single bit aka bool values into a int can also be done. Let's say we normally write out our coordinate position like the below.

int posX = 0;
int posY = 0;
int posZ = 0;

Now let's say these never wen't passed 1023. So 0 through 1023 was the maximum distance on all of these. I'm choose 1023 for other purposes as previously mentioned you can manipulate the "&" variable as a way to force a value between 0 and 2^N - 1 values. So let's say your range was 0 through 1023. We can perform "value & 1023" and it'll always be a value between 0 and 1023 without any index parameter checks. Keep in mind as previously mentioned this only works with powers of two minus one. 2^10 = 1024 - 1 = 1023.

E.g. no more if (value >= 0 && value <= 1023).

So 2^10 = 1024, which requires 10 bits in order to hold a number between 0 and 1023.

So 10x3 = 30 which is still less than or equal to 32. Is sufficient for holding all these values in an int.

So we can perform the following. So to see how many bits we used. We do 0 + 10 + 20. The reason I put the 0 there is to show you visually that 2^0 = 1 so # * 1 = #. The reason we need y << 10 is because x uses up 10 bits which is 0 through 1023. So we need to multiple y by 1024 to have unique values for each. Then Z needs to be multiplied by 2^20 which is 1,048,576.

int position = (x << 0) | (y << 10) | (z << 20);

This makes comparisons fast.

We can now do

return this.position == position;

apposed to

return this.x == x && this.y == y && this.z == z;

Now what if we wanted the actual positions of each?

For the x we simply do the following.

int getX()
{ 
   return position & 1023;
}

Then for the y we need to perform a left bit shift then AND it.

int getY()
{ 
   return (position >> 10) & 1023;
}

As you may guess the Z is the same as the Y, but instead of 10 we use 20.

int getZ()
{ 
   return (position >> 20) & 1023;
}

I hope whoever views this will find it worth while information :).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 very valuable introduction on how to deal with bitwise operations with primitive types :) –  lekroif Jan 10 '13 at 13:45
    
Thank's I've included additional information. With some examples as well. So anyone who may come along this can really know the amazing uses of bits. I've really never used this thing called "BitSet", but looking at the Java version of it. It seems like complete shit. I'm surprised that very few of the comments here talk about bit-shifting. I don't even really know too much on it, but I know enough to make use of the nice feature it can provide. –  Jeremy Trifilo Jan 10 '13 at 23:52

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