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struct a
{
   public string str;
}

a bb = new a();

class a
{
   public string str;
}

a bb = new a();

Is it correct to say that class supports Garbage Collection? On the other hand does struct keeps the memory?

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closed as not a real question by svick, Henk Holterman, skolima, Servy, Kendall Frey Jan 8 '13 at 17:57

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
I really don't understand what are you asking. What does it mean “supports garbage collection”? Is there some specific reason why are you asking this? –  svick Jan 8 '13 at 17:37
    
Your question doesn't make sense as-is. If you could give us an example, and what you expect to see, maybe we could help you better. –  Kendall Frey Jan 8 '13 at 17:39
    
Is your concern that the struct will forever consume memory? That is certainly not the case. –  Jon B Jan 8 '13 at 17:40
1  
Same as Destroying a struct object in C#? –  mrtgold Jan 8 '13 at 17:40
    
In case of class it get memory at runtime. right? My question is - using struct also needs memory in RAM for execution. correct? –  testing Jan 8 '13 at 17:43
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5 Answers 5

Yes. If struct is a field of a object of reference type, then it is stored in the heap, then it is subject to Garbage Collection

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you mean like this ? struct a { public object str; } –  testing Jan 8 '13 at 17:38
    
@testing no, class Foo { private struct Bar; } –  Ilya Ivanov Jan 8 '13 at 17:39
    
In case of class it get memory at runtime. right? My question is - using struct also needs memory in RAM for execution. correct? –  testing Jan 8 '13 at 17:44
    
1  
@testing Stop asking that question. You have gotten multiple responses in several comments. –  Kendall Frey Jan 8 '13 at 17:56
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EDIT -> Answer updated following discussion on comments, and link shared by Rob

struct are value types. Usually No separate memory is allocated for them on heap. Usually No need of Garbage Collection.

There are however exceptions. Memory allocation is not guranteed to be stack allocated for value types or heap allocated for reference type. Read this answer to other SO question and The Stack in An Implementation Detail for detail information.

If struct has some reference type as member variable, then the reference type will be garbage collected (in next garbage collection trigger) once struct goes out of scope and the reference type has no more accessible roots to it.

If your example, you have used string as reference type. String are handled differently using intern pool.

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What about if struct is a object field? –  Ilya Ivanov Jan 8 '13 at 17:38
1  
So, if I have an array of structs, where is that allocated? –  svick Jan 8 '13 at 17:39
    
Do you mean they will not be allocated on heap? –  Ilya Ivanov Jan 8 '13 at 17:40
    
@svick, Array is a class and is reference type. –  Tilak Jan 8 '13 at 17:40
    
As mentioned, if struct has object field, that object will go to heap, struct will remain on stack. –  Tilak Jan 8 '13 at 17:42
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I'm not feel I understand your question clearly but I want to say something.

Structs are value types. Value types allocated for them on stack of the memory. In C#, only the reference types are getting garbage collected. So garbage collecter should picks only the reference types for the process memory de-allocation.

But a struct structure could be boxed type, they could a part of an array, they could be a field in a some class, so I think these cases structs are allocated in heap of the memory.

But if these struct is a part of an object, GC should pick them also but I'm not sure of this point.

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you can be sure it will pick struct also :) –  Ilya Ivanov Jan 8 '13 at 17:47
    
"Value types allocated for them on stack of the memory." Just don't even say this. Even if you add qualifications, it's just completely false and highly likely to be be mis-understood. When a variable contains a value type, it contains the data representing that object, when a variable represents a reference type the variable contains a reference to some other location. In C# certain local variables may go on the stack, but that's honestly not that relevant to proper understanding of value/reference types. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 17:54
    
The basic meaning of heap is that it contains some memory address and whereas the stack contains direct value. that's it? –  testing Jan 8 '13 at 17:54
1  
@testing No, not really. The heap is just a large section of memory in which objects are created and live for an unknown amount of time. The stack is a section of memory in which items are always added to the end and removed from the end, so you can only store information on the stack that conforms to that behavior; in practice this is primarily local variables, return values of methods, and the information about what method called each method. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 17:56
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If your question is whether the string will remain in memory in the struct example, the answer is no. Members of structs are subject to garbage collection when they leave scope, just like any other objects.

The .NET GC uses a mark-and-sweep approach, where it examines objects that are pointed to by static fields, existing objects, and local variables on the stack, among others.

Since structs in local variables are located on the stack, they are swept as normal. Structs in object members on the heap are also swept as the GC goes through the object tree. Same goes for static members.

In short, structs are swept in the same manner as classes. The only difference between them is the way they are stored. Structs are stored per-variable, while classes are stored as a reference. Both ways are subject to the GC.

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The basic meaning of heap is that it contains some memory address and whereas the stack contains direct value. that's it? –  testing Jan 8 '13 at 17:53
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If I know correctly, yes in C# they both are Garbage Collected.

Whether stored in heap or stack depends on lifetime of the variable/instance not the type.

One thing to consider is when more complicated situations such as subscribed events handler resides in the instance of class, in that case Garbage Collector can skip collecting and the instance can resides in memory. But above examples will probably be collected since only one string type declared.

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1  
The purpose of the garbage collector is to manage the memory allocated on the heap; it allocates new memory when requested for new allocation and is responsible for keeping track of what memory is currently "used" so as to not provide that memory to anyone else while they're still needed elsewhere. Information stored on the stack is not within the "scope" of the GC; the GC is not used for either allocation or deallocation. Both objects and structs (in different situations) involve allocation of stack and heap memory, in different ways. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 18:06
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