Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote the following code to list all the prime numbers upto 2 billion using Sieve's method. I used bitmasking for flagging purpose. While I am able to get the prime numbers correctly, a few primes in the beginning are missing every time. Please help me find the bug in the program.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

#define MAX 2000000000

char* listPrimes(){
int block = sqrt(MAX);
char* mark = calloc((MAX/8),sizeof(char));
int i = 2;
int j;
char mask[8];
for(j=0;j<8;j++)
    mask[j] = 0;
mask[7] = 1;
mask[6] |= mask[7] << 1;
mask[5] |= mask[7] << 2;
mask[4] |= mask[7] << 3;
mask[3] |= mask[7] << 4;
mask[2] |= mask[7] << 5;
mask[1] |= mask[7] << 6;
mask[0] |= mask[7] << 7;

for(j=0;j<8;j++)
    printf("%d ",mask[j]);
mark[0] |= mask[0];
mark[0] |= mask[1];

while (i < block){

        for (j = 2; i*j <= block; j++)
                mark[(i*j) / 8] |= mask[((i*j) % 8 )];
        i++;
    }
printf("\n");
printf("The block size is\t:\t%d\n",block);


j = 2;
while(j<=block){
    if((mark[j / 8] & mask[j]) == 0 ){
        for(i = 2;i <= MAX; i++){
            if((i%j) == 0){
                mark[i / 8] |= mask[(i % 8)];
            }
        }
    }
while((mark[++j / 8] & mask[j % 8]) != 0);
}


for(j=0;j<=MAX;j++)
        if((mark[j / 8] & mask[(j % 8)]) == 0)
            printf("%d\n", ((8*(j / 8)) + (j % 8)));

return mark;
}   

int main(int argc,char* argv[]){

listPrimes();

return 0;
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As ArunMK said, in the second while loop you mark the prime j itself as a multiple of j. And as Lee Meador said, you need to take the modulus of j modulo 8 for the mask index, otherwise you access out of bounds and invoke undefined behaviour.

A further point where you invoke undefined behaviour is

while((mark[++j / 8] & mask[j % 8]) != 0);

where you use and modify j without intervening sequence point. You can avoid that by writing

do {
    ++j;
}while((mark[j/8] & mask[j%8]) != 0);

or, if you insist on a while loop with empty body

while(++j, (mark[j/8] & mask[j%8]) != 0);

you can use the comma operator.

More undefined behaviour by accessing mark[MAX/8] which is not allocated in

for(i = 2;i <= MAX; i++){

and

for(j=0;j<=MAX;j++)

Also, if char is signed and eight bits wide,

mask[0] |= mask[7] << 7;

is implementation-defined (and may raise an implementation-defined signal) since the result of

mask[0] | (mask[7] << 7)

(the int 128) is not representable as a char.

But why are you dividing each number by all primes not exceeding the square root of the bound in the second while loop?

    for(i = 2;i <= MAX; i++){
        if((i%j) == 0){

That makes your algorithm not a Sieve of Eratosthenes, but a trial division.

Why don't you use the technique from the first while loop there too? (And then, why two loops at all?)

while (i <= block){
    if ((mark[i/8] & mask[i%8]) == 0) {
        for (j = 2; i*j < MAX; j++) {
            mark[(i*j) / 8] |= mask[((i*j) % 8 )];
        }
    }
    i++;
}

would not overflow (for the given value of MAX, if that is representable as an int), and produce the correct output orders of magnitude faster.

share|improve this answer
    
The ++j is defined to happen before the value of j is used either place since evaluation is guaranteed to be left to right. There is no need to change the 'while'. However, your suggested code is easier to read and understand particularly in 2012 where using the ++ operator this way is frowned upon and newer developers may find it unfamiliar. –  Lee Meador Jan 9 '13 at 16:17
    
"since evaluation is guaranteed to be left to right." No, it isn't. The order of evaluation of the operands of & is unspecified, and the storing of the incremented value is not guaranteed to have happened before the next sequence point. So even if mark[++j/8] is evaluated first, the mask[j%8] might still read the unincremented value of j. Compile with -Wsequence-point (and optimisations) and your gcc will warn you about it. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 9 '13 at 16:29
    
You are right. I am wrong. Only && and || guarantee left to right and they don't guarantee the expression to the right is even evaluated at all. There are some other obvious ones like , and ?: that have an ordering. 'comma' is there specifically to do things in order and ?: has to evaluate the condition to tell which of the other two expressions to evaluate. –  Lee Meador Jan 9 '13 at 16:53
    
What is that 2nd loop supposed to accomplish? All the multiples of the primes should already be marked in the 1st loop. Even your suggestion to check for the current i already being marked as a multiple of something smaller doesn't make it work it just makes it more efficient by skipping when we know all the multiples are already set. –  Lee Meador Jan 9 '13 at 17:04
    
In the original, the first loop only marks to the square root of the limit, so the second is necessary to mark the composites > block = sqrt(MAX). My suggestion is to use only the one loop, and only mark multiples of primes. It works. I have omitted the obvious improvements (start at i*i, don't compute i*j but increment j by i [2*i for odd i], ...) to stay close to the OP's code. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 9 '13 at 17:16

Change the middle loop to add the modulo:

j = 2;
while(j<=block){
    if((mark[j / 8] & mask[j % 8]) == 0 ){
        for(i = 2;i <= MAX; i++){
            if((i%j) == 0){
                mark[i / 8] |= mask[(i % 8)];
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

In the second while loop you are looping through i from 2 onwards and you do an if (i%j == 0). This will be true for i when it is a prime as well. You need to check for (i != j). Also the modulo as reported above. Hence it becomes: if ((i%j == 0) { if (i!=j) mark[i/j] |= mask[i%j]; }

share|improve this answer
    
Or change this loop for(i = 2;i <= MAX; i++) to start at 2*j –  Lee Meador Jan 9 '13 at 17:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.