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With what macro can I replace the "template..." boilerplate with something shorter? ie: instead of these:

template <typename NodeDataT, typename ArcDataT>
/*constructor*/ GraphDirected::
GraphDirected()
{
}
template <typename NodeDataT, typename ArcDataT>
/*destructor*/ GraphDirected::
~GraphDirected()
{
    clear();
}    
template <typename NodeDataT, typename ArcDataT>
void GraphDirected::
clear()
{
    nodes.clear();
    arcs.clear();
}

I want to write this:

boilerplate(/*constructor*/)
GraphDirected()
{
}
boilerplate(/*destructor*/)
~GraphDirected()
{
    clear();
}
boilerplate(void)
clear()
{
    nodes.clear();
    arcs.clear();
}

And of course at the end I would need some protection (? #undef ?) so that other files not get messed up.

If it isnt much more complicated, how could uglynesses like these be handled?:

template <typename ElemType>
typename BST<ElemType>::nodeT * BST<ElemType>::
recFindNode(nodeT *t, ElemType & key) { ... }
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1  
At first I was afraid somebody wanted a macro for just the three tokens template <typename. –  aschepler Jan 8 '13 at 17:51
3  
Why not defining these methods right inside the class definition? –  ipc Jan 8 '13 at 17:52
    
@ipc: Exactly my thought! –  Nawaz Jan 8 '13 at 17:53
1  
template functions are always inline. –  ipc Jan 8 '13 at 17:56
2  
@ipc: not exactly, the types are substituted and then compiled, which is not the same as inlining, (btw: recursive functions cannot be inlined, since you do not know the depth of recursion at compile time) –  user1358 Jan 8 '13 at 17:58

3 Answers 3

I would not suggest you to use MACRO just to avoid few tokens. Since the definition of members of a class template has to be in the same file, you have to define them in the same file, even if you do that outside the class.

A better solution is to define the members inside the class itself, so you don't have to repeat the tokens everytime you define a member.

Remember that templates generate ugly error messages, and MACRO is EVIL. If you combine both, you will see even uglier and insane error messages when something goes wrong.

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well, I see nothing wrong if you can beautify your template boilerplate by:

#define pretty ugly

as long as you feel it does no harm.

For types, you can always do a typedef

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If you really don't like typing, you could replace typename with class, use standardized template names for your application domain, and write struct instead of class to avoid typing public:, and finally make the class header-only:

template <class N, class A>
struct GraphDirected
{
    GraphDirected() {} // default constructor
    // rest of the class definition

private:
    // helpers and data go here
};
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