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I frequently need to limit SELECTs by fields like publishStart, publishEnd, active

I have these fields in several different tables. So only rows should be selected, that are

a: active == true;
b: publishStart < now;
c: publishEnd > now;

So, for example:

db.myTable.SingleOrDefault(a => (a.ID == _theID 
          //now the active and start-end part:            
                      && ((a.publishEnd > DateTime.Now) || (a.publishEnd == null))
                      && ((a.publishStart <= DateTime.Now) || (a.publishStart == null))
                      && a.active == true));

This is a bit lengthy, so I wonder if it is possible to create a (extension?)-method like:

db.myTable.SingleOrDefault(a => (a.ID == _theID).isActive()

where the isActive() provides the 3 lines of the above snippet.

How could I do this? Is there a better way to clean up code?

share|improve this question
    
These are all in separate tables, right? Not one single table that's exposed by the context? I ask because you indicate in the preamble that the properties are on separate tables, while you use only one context in the filter. If they're all on the same table, it's easy, if they're on different tables, it alters the right answer tremendously. –  casperOne Jan 8 '13 at 18:05
    
In that case you'd need to call IsActive before SingleOrDefault so that it can filter the active items before you take just one, unless there is only ever one item with that ID. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 18:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

To define an extension you need a static class. You can put this in whatever namespace you like, just remember to include it in your usings.

public static class Extensions
{
    public IQueryable<T> Active<T>(this IQueryable<T> source)
        where T : YourEntityType
    {
        return source.Where(a => ((a.publishEnd > DateTime.Now) || (a.publishEnd == null))
                          && ((a.publishStart <= DateTime.Now) || (a.publishStart == null))
                          && a.active == true);
    }
}

Notice YourEntityType in there. This is used to ensure the method is aware of the existence of publishStart, publishEnd, and active. This should be either the class that implements these fields or a contract (interface) that defines them.

You would then call this like so:

var item = db.myTable.Active().SingleOrDefault(...);

More on extension methods here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb383977.aspx


As there are lots of comments popping up all over the place, I'm going to add here a brief explanation of the interface solution...

It's unclear in the question whether or not there is a common implementation for the three filtered fields or an interface to define them. If not, for the above to work, you will not either:

  1. A base class implementing these fields. In this scenario you would replace YourEntityType with YourBaseEntityType.
  2. An interface to define the fields. In this scenario you would need to have your classes implement the fields. If the classes are auto generated (e.g. entity framework model/db first) then you can implement partial classes, having them implement the interface. In this case you would replace YourEntityType with IYourContract.
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a reason to use IQueryable<T> instead of IEnumerable<T>? –  Default Jan 8 '13 at 18:05
    
This won't work in a call to SingleOrDefault which is what the OP asks for. –  casperOne Jan 8 '13 at 18:07
1  
@Default. I prefer to use IQueryable<T> as I've had polymorphism issues in the past with IEnumerable<T>. Given that there exist extensions for both IEnumerable<T> and IQueryable<T>, returning an IEnumerable<T> can result in the wrong extensions being called further in the chain resulting in enumeration rather than deferred queries. –  flem Jan 8 '13 at 18:10
2  
@Default It's a question of whether you want to be performing the query on the database, or returning all of the items and filtering in C# code. Filtering in the DB is almost always preferable, when possible, but it's not always possible. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 18:12
    
There is no need to make this a generic method and then constrain the type parameter to a type unless all types having this three properties are modeled using inheritance - something I would really not suggest to do in most cases. –  Daniel Brückner Jan 8 '13 at 18:12

Just define an interface like this

public interface IHaveAActivityPeriod 
{
    Boolean active { get; }

    DateTime? publishStart { get; }

    DateTime? publishEnd { get; }
} 

and add it to all relevant classes.

public class Foo : IHaveAActivityPeriod { [...] }

public class Bar : IHaveAActivityPeriod { [...] }

Now you can use this extension method

public static class Extensions
{
    public static Boolean IsActive(this IHaveAActivityPeriod item)
    {
        var now = DateTime.Now;

        return item.active &&
               (item.publishStart <= now)
               (!item.publishEnd.HasValue || (item.publishEnd > now));
    }
}

on every instance implementing IHaveAActivityPeriod.

var foo = new Foo();

var isFooActive = foo.IsActive();

var bar = new Bar();

var isBarActive = bar.IsActive();

I completely missed the possibility to construct an extension method that performs the filtering of a sequence instead of looking at a single entity at once. Just take the extension method from flem's answer an throw in the interface as type constraint.

public static class Extensions
{
    public IQueryable<T> IsActive<T>(this IQueryable<T> sequence)
        where T : IHaveAActivityPeriod
    {
        return source.Where(item =>
                   item.active &&
                   (item.publishStart <= now) &&
                   (!item.publishEnd.HasValue || (item.publishEnd > now));

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This won't transform to sql, and would therefore require full evaluation for filtering. –  flem Jan 8 '13 at 18:03
    
That is true, but there is no really good solution that is translatable into SQL (without a custom provider) and so decided to present an LINQ to Objects solution. –  Daniel Brückner Jan 8 '13 at 18:08
public static class Extensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<MyClass> isActive(this IEnumerable<MyClass> list)
    {
        return list.Where(a =>  
               ((a.publishEnd > DateTime.Now) || (a.publishEnd == null))
                 && ((a.publishStart <= DateTime.Now) || (a.publishStart == null))
                 && a.active == true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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