Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a function that takes a variable number of arguments. Each argument is a reference that the function will modify directly. Here is how I call the function:

set "A=" && set "B=" && set "C="
call :variadic_func A B C
echo [%A%][%B%][%C%]

goto :eof

If I don't use setlocal to limit variable scope, the function works fine. The function creates references X, Y, and Z and assigns them 1, 2, and 3. When the function returns, the caller sees that its variables A, B, and C are 1, 2, and 3. Good. Pretend that this is a variadic function and it figures out how many arguments it has at runtime.

:variadic_func
set "x=%1" && set "y=%2" && set "z=%3"
set "%x%=1" && set "%y%=2" && set "%z%=3"
goto :eof

Output:

C:\scratch\variadic_batch>variadic.bat
[1][2][3]

But I want to limit the scope of my function's variables with setlocal. So that means any values I write to X, Y, and Z get thrown away at the endlocal. How do I get the values out of the function?

:variadic_func
setlocal
set "x=%1" && set "y=%2" && set "z=%3"
set "%x%=1" && set "%y%=2" && set "%z%=3"

endlocal && (
    call set "%x%=%%%%x%%%%"
    call set "%y%=%%%%y%%%%"
    call set "%z%=%%%%z%%%%"
)

goto :eof

Unfortunately, the calling context receives the values %x%, %y%, and %z%. I thought the code above would be expanded like so: 1. Expand %x% first to get call set A=%%A%%. Then the call gets executed and it would evaluate A=%A%. But I just end up assigning the text %A% to the variable A instead of evaluating it.

C:\scratch\variadic_batch>variadic.bat
[%x%][%y%][%z%]

Why is it not working like I expect, and how do I fix it?

(I just thought of doing a setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion before the function call so maybe delayed expansion would still be available when I do the endlocal in the function, but even if that works it'd be nice if the function didn't rely on the caller to be in a delayed expansion block... and I don't even know whether delayed expansion blocks stack)

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

This is an interesting topic! If you know in advance how many variables the function will get, you can assemble the appropiate line at end to return the values to the caller's environment this way:

:variadic_func
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
set "x=%1" & set "y=%2" & set "z=%3"
set "%x%=1" & set "%y%=2" & set "%z%=3"
for /F "tokens=1-3" %%a in ("!%x%! !%y%! !%z%!") do (
   endlocal
   set "%x%=%%a" & set "%y%=%%b" & set "%z%=%%c"
)
exit /B

However, if the number of variables is unknow, previous method can not be used.

(I used exit /B to terminate subroutines and goto :EOF for the main file only)

Your example is imprecise anyway, because if you don't know how many variables comes, you can NOT use fixed names as "x", "y" or "z". The only way to manage this situation is storing the names in an array and then process the array elements.

This way, before the function ends we could assemble a list of "var=value" pairs that will be executed in a FOR after the endlocal, so the variables will be defined in the caller's environment:

@echo off

call :variadic_func One Two Three
echo THREE VARS: One=[%One%] Two=[%Two%] Three=[%Three%] Four=[%Four%] Five=[%Five%]
call :variadic_func One Two Three Four Five
echo FIVE VARS:  One=[%One%] Two=[%Two%] Three=[%Three%] Four=[%Four%] Five=[%Five%]
goto :EOF

:variadic_func
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
rem Collect the list of variable names in "var" array:
set i=0
:nextVar
   if "%1" equ "" goto endVars
   set /A i+=1
   set var[%i%]=%1
   shift
goto nextVar
:endVars
rem Assign random numbers to the variables (for example):
for /L %%i in (1,1,%i%) do (
   set !var[%%i]!=!random!
)
rem Assemble the list of "var=value" assignments that will be executed at end:
set assignments=
for /L %%i in (1,1,%i%) do (
   for %%v in (!var[%%i]!) do (
      set assignments=!assignments! "%%v=!%%v!"
   )
)
rem Execute the list of variable assignments in the caller's environment:
endlocal & for %%a in (%assignments%) do set %%a
exit /B

Output:

THREE VARS: One=[29407] Two=[21271] Three=[5873] Four=[] Five=[]
FIVE VARS:  One=[30415] Two=[2595] Three=[22479] Four=[13956] Five=[26412]

EDIT:

I borrowed the method from dbenham's solution to return any number of variables with no limitations, excepting those noted by him. This is the new version:

@echo off

call :variadic_func One Two Three
echo THREE VARS: One=[%One%] Two=[%Two%] Three=[%Three%] Four=[%Four%] Five=[%Five%]
call :variadic_func One Two Three Four Five
echo FIVE VARS:  One=[%One%] Two=[%Two%] Three=[%Three%] Four=[%Four%] Five=[%Five%]
goto :EOF

:variadic_func
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
rem Assemble the list of variable names in "var" array:
set i=0
:nextVar
   if "%1" equ "" goto endVars
   set /A i+=1
   set var[%i%]=%1
   shift
goto nextVar
:endVars
rem Assign random numbers to the variables (for example):
for /L %%i in (1,1,%i%) do (
   set !var[%%i]!=!random!
)
rem Complete "var[i]=name" array contents to "var[i]=name=value"
for /L %%i in (1,1,%i%) do (
   for %%v in (!var[%%i]!) do (
      set "var[%%i]=%%v=!%%v!"
   )
)
rem Execute the list of variable assignments in the caller's environment:
for /F "tokens=1* delims==" %%a in ('set var[') do endlocal & set "%%b"
exit /B

Antonio

share|improve this answer
    
Nice Aacini, but there are a few limitations: 1) Values with quotes and special characters can cause problems. Example "this & that" & the other 2) Values with * and ? will be corrupted. –  dbenham Jan 8 '13 at 23:53
    
Another limitation - the sum length of all returned definitions must fit within ~8191 bytes. –  dbenham Jan 8 '13 at 23:57
    
Thanks Dave, I borrowed your method and improved my solution! ;) –  Aacini Jan 9 '13 at 2:39
    
This is a fantastic adaptation of the traditional way of building an assignment list and executing it. While dbenham introduced a technique that I think is quite novel. Not sure which approach I will use yet, but both answers are awesome. –  indiv Jan 18 '13 at 4:35

Very interesting question, and I'm surprised how easy it is to solve :-)

EDIT - My original answer didn't quite answer the question, as Aacini noted in his comment. At the bottom I have a version that does directly answer the question. I've also updated my original answer to include a few more limitations that I discovered

You can return any number of variables very easily if you stipulate that the names of all variables to be returned are prepended with a constant prefix. The return variable prefix can be passed in as one of your parameters.

The following line is all that is needed:
for /f "delims=" %%A in ('set prefix.') do endlocal & set "%%A"

The entire results of the set prefix command is buffered before any iterations take place. The first iteration executes the only ENDLOCAL that is required to get back to the environment state that existed prior to the CALL. The subsequent ENDLOCAL iterations do no harm because ENDLOCAL within a CALLed function only work on SETLOCALs that were issued within the CALL. Additional redundant ENDLOCAL are ignored.

There are some really nice features of this very simple solution:

  • There is theoretically no limit to the number of variables that are returned.
  • The returned values can contain almost any combination of characters.
  • The returned values can approach the theoretical maximum length of 8191 bytes long.

There are also a few limitations:

  • The returned value cannot contain line feeds
  • If the final character of a returned value is a carriage return, that final carriage return will be stripped.
  • Any returned value that contains ! will be corrupted if delayed expansion is enabled when the CALL is made.
  • I have not figured out an elegant method to set a returned variable to undefined.

Here is a simple example of a variadic function that returns a variable number of values

@echo off
setlocal
set varBeforeCall=ok

echo(
call :variadic callA 10 -34 26
set callA
set varBeforeCall

echo(
call :variadic callB 1 2 5 10 50 100
set callB
set varBeforeCall

exit /b


:variadic  returnPrefix  arg1  [arg2 ...]
  @echo off
  setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
  set /a const=!random!%%100

  :: Clear any existing returnPrefix variables
  for /f "delims==" %%A in ('set %1. 2^>nul') do set "%%A="

  :: Define the variables to be returned
  set "%~1.cnt=0"
  :argLoop
  if "%~2" neq "" (
    set /a "%~1.cnt+=1"
    set /a "%~1.!%~1.cnt!=%2*const"
    shift /2
    goto :argLoop
  )

  :: Return the variables accross the ENDLOCAL barrier
  for /f "delims=" %%A in ('set %1. 2^>nul') do endlocal & set "%%A"
exit /b

And here is a sample run result:

callA.1=40
callA.2=-136
callA.3=104
callA.cnt=3
varBeforeCall=ok

callB.1=24
callB.2=48
callB.3=120
callB.4=240
callB.5=1200
callB.6=2400
callB.cnt=6
varBeforeCall=ok

Here is a version that is safe to CALL when delayed expansion is enabled

With a bit of extra code, it is possible to remove the limitation regarding CALLing the function while delayed expansion is enabled and the return value contains !.

The returned values are manipulated as necessary to protect ! when delayed expansion is enabled. The code is optimized such that the relatively expensive minipulation (particularly the CALL) is only executed when delayed expansion was enabled and the value contains !.

The returned value still cannot contain line feeds. A new limitation is that all carriage returns will be stripped if the returned value contains ! and delayed expansion was enabled when the CALL was made.

Here is a demo.

@echo off
setlocal
set varBeforeCall=ok

echo(
echo Results when delayed expansion is Disabled
call :variadic callA 10 -34 26
set callA
set varBeforeCall

setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
echo(
echo Results when delayed expansion is Enabled
call :variadic callB 1 2 5 10 50 100
set callB
set varBeforeCall

exit /b


:variadic  returnPrefix  arg1  [arg2 ...]
  @echo off

  :: Determine if caller has delayed expansion enabled
  setlocal
  set "NotDelayed=!"

  setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
  set /a const=!random!%%100

  :: Clear any existing returnPrefix variables
  for /f "delims==" %%A in ('set %1. 2^>nul') do set "%%A="

  :: Define the variables to be returned
  set "%~1.cnt=0"
  :argLoop
  if "%~2" neq "" (
    set /a "%~1.cnt+=1"
    set /a "%~1.!%~1.cnt!=%2*const"
    shift /2
    goto :argLoop
  )
  set %~1.trouble1="!const!\^^&^!%%"\^^^^^&^^!%%
  set %~1.trouble2="!const!\^^&%%"\^^^^^&%%

  :: Prepare variables for return when caller has delayed expansion enabled
  if not defined NotDelayed for /f "delims==" %%A in ('set %1. 2^>nul') do (
    for /f delims^=^ eol^= %%V in ("!%%A!") do if "%%V" neq "!%%A!" (
      set "%%A=!%%A:\=\s!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:%%=\p!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:"=\q!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:^=\c!"
      call set "%%A=%%%%A:^!=^^^!%%" ^^!
      set "%%A=!%%A:^^=^!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:\c=^^!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:\q="!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:\p=%%!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:\s=\!"
    )
  )

  :: Return the variables accross the ENDLOCAL barrier
  for /f "delims=" %%A in ('set %1. 2^>nul') do endlocal & endlocal & set "%%A"
exit /b

And some sample results:

Results when delayed expansion is Disabled
Environment variable callA not defined
callA.1=780
callA.2=-2652
callA.3=2028
callA.cnt=3
callA.trouble1="78\^&!%"\^&!%
callA.trouble2="78\^&%"\^&%
varBeforeCall=ok

Results when delayed expansion is Enabled
Environment variable callB not defined
callB.1=48
callB.2=96
callB.3=240
callB.4=480
callB.5=2400
callB.6=4800
callB.cnt=6
callB.trouble1="48\^&!%"\^&!%
callB.trouble2="48\^&%"\^&%
varBeforeCall=ok

Note how the format of the returned trouble values is consistent whether or not delayed expansion was enabled when the CALL was made. The trouble1 value would have been corrupted when delayed expansion was enabled if it were not for the extra code because of the !.

EDIT: Here is a version that directly answers the question

The original question stipulated that the names of each returned variable are supposed to be provided in the parameter list. I modified my algorithm to prefix each variable name with a dot within the function. Then I slightly modified the final returning FOR statement to strip off the leading dot. There is a restriction that the names of the returned variables cannot begin with a dot.

This version includes the safe return technique that allows CALLs while delayed expansion is enabled.

@echo off
setlocal disableDelayedExpansion

echo(
set $A=before
set $varBeforeCall=ok
echo ($) Values before CALL:
set $
echo(
echo ($) Values after CALL when delayed expansion is Disabled:
call :variadic $A $B
set $

setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
echo(
set #A=before
set #varBeforeCall=ok
echo (#) Values before CALL:
set #
echo(
echo (#) Values after CALL when delayed expansion is Enabled:
call :variadic #A #B #C
set #

exit /b


:variadic  arg1  [arg2 ...]
  @echo off

  :: Determine if caller has delayed expansion enabled
  setlocal
  set "NotDelayed=!"

  setlocal enableDelayedExpansion

  :: Clear any existing . variables
  for /f "delims==" %%A in ('set . 2^>nul') do set "%%A="

  :: Define the variables to be returned
  :argLoop
  if "%~1" neq "" (
    set /a num=!random!%%10
    set ^".%~1="!num!\^^&^!%%"\^^^^^&^^!%%"
    shift /1
    goto :argLoop
  )

  :: Prepare variables for return when caller has delayed expansion enabled
  if not defined NotDelayed for /f "delims==" %%A in ('set . 2^>nul') do (
    for /f delims^=^ eol^= %%V in ("!%%A!") do if "%%V" neq "!%%A!" (
      set "%%A=!%%A:\=\s!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:%%=\p!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:"=\q!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:^=\c!"
      call set "%%A=%%%%A:^!=^^^!%%" ^^!
      set "%%A=!%%A:^^=^!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:\c=^^!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:\q="!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:\p=%%!"
      set "%%A=!%%A:\s=\!"
    )
  )

  :: Return the variables accross the ENDLOCAL barrier
  for /f "tokens=* delims=." %%A in ('set . 2^>nul') do endlocal & endlocal & set "%%A"
exit /b

And sample results:

($) Values before CALL:
$A=before
$varBeforeCall=ok

($) Values after CALL when delayed expansion is Disabled:
$A="5\^&!%"\^&!%
$B="5\^&!%"\^&!%
$varBeforeCall=ok

(#) Values before CALL:
#A=before
#varBeforeCall=ok

(#) Values after CALL when delayed expansion is Enabled:
#A="7\^&!%"\^&!%
#B="2\^&!%"\^&!%
#C="0\^&!%"\^&!%
#varBeforeCall=ok
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 Clever idea on using set to return the values! However, this topic is not about a method to return any number of variables, I think; if it would be, it would be even easier to pass just two parameters: the prefix and the number of variables to return. Note that the parameters are not variable values, but "Each argument is a reference that the function will modify directly". As I understand it, the function receive several variable names and those names can not be modified in order to make the function easier to write. –  Aacini Jan 9 '13 at 2:40
    
@Aacini - I read the question more carefully and I see your point. I've provided another version that directly answers the question. I also found some more limitations. –  dbenham Jan 9 '13 at 5:31

Remove a pair of the percents from the value. call set "%x%=%%%%x%%%%" into call set "%x%=%%%x%%%"

Currently it is evaluating as follows:

:: Here is the base command
call set "%x%=%%%%x%%%%"
:: The single percents are evaluated and the doubles are escaped.
set "A=%%x%%"
:: The doubles are escaped again leaving literal % signs
"A=%x%"

You want as follows:

:: Here is the base command
call set "%x%=%%%x%%%"
:: The single percents are evaluated and the doubles are escaped.
set "A=%A%"
:: The single percents are evaluated.
"A=1"

When doing variable expansion using the call command, single percents % get evaluate first, then double percents %% seconds due to batch escaping.

Batch commands are read from left to right. So when there are an even number of % signs such as %%%%, the first and third percent signs will be utilized as escape characters for the second and fourth leaving no percent signs left to be used for variable evaluation.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.