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I have a public generic method which accepts one generic parameter. I also have one several private methods accepting concrete type arguments that i'm calling from generic method. To better describe my problem take a look at the code below:

    public void Save<T>(T entity) where T : class
    {
        if(entity is LibraryItem)      Save(entity as LibraryItem);
        else if(entity is Folder)      Save(entity as Folder);
        else if(entity is ProductType) Save(entity as ProductType);
        else if(entity is ProcessName) Save(entity as ProcessName);
    }

And private methods:

private void Save(ProcessName proc){}
private void Save(ProductType type){}
private void Save(Folder folder){}
...

Looking at the code, I really don't like the solution, checking for every possible type looks like a bad practice imho. So I wonder if there is any cleaner solution to my problem? Maybe it's possible to cast T dynamically at runtime and call appropriate private method?

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use runtime type definition:

public void Save<T>(T entity) where T : class
{
    Save((dynamic)entity);
}

private void Save(LibraryItem lib){}
private void Save(ProcessName proc){}
private void Save(ProductType type){}
private void Save(Folder folder){}

You also will need one method with parameter of object type to handle case where entity is not LibraryItem, ProcessName, ProductType, or Folder:

private void Save(object obj) {  }
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3  
Hello, downvoter. Some explanations, if any? –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 8 '13 at 18:47
1  
As easy as that? I expected something more complicated such as reflection :) Happy to find that out. Thanks :) –  Davita Jan 8 '13 at 18:52
    
@Davita dynamic isn't magic. You should be aware of the ramifications of using it as they are significant. –  Servy Jan 8 '13 at 18:58
1  
dynamic definitely isn't magic and unleashing dynamic typing in a statically typed language is not without problems. Overload resolutions is one of few safe ways to use it. For performance critical stuff it might be to expensive though. –  Anders Abel Jan 8 '13 at 19:02
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You're on the right track. Use the dynamic keyword to get runtime overload resolution:

Save((dynamic)entity);

Normally overload resolution is done during compile time on the static type (which is object for a generic type). By casting to dynamic you defer the resolution to run time and the runtime type is used instead of the static type.

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Downvoter, please explain... –  Anders Abel Jan 8 '13 at 18:47
2  
looks like downvoter does not know C#, but has enough reputation for downvoting :) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 8 '13 at 18:48
    
Thanks +1 from me :) –  Davita Jan 8 '13 at 18:52
1  
And from me to bring Universe to it's normal state :) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 8 '13 at 18:56
1  
Thanks :-) Already upvoted yours because you remembered the need for an overload accepting object. –  Anders Abel Jan 8 '13 at 18:58
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The ideal mechanism would be to take whatever aspect of Save is specific to that type and make it a part of each of the concrete types so that you can use Polymorphism.

It's likely not appropriate for each item to be responsible for saving itself, but what it should be doing is exposing enough information to allow someone else to write a general purpose Save method that simply accepts an interface or base type of which all of your types implement that exposes enough information for the type to allow it to be saved.

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