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I have a form on my site. A series of functions validate each form field on the form #contactForm

I have the following submit function which, if all the fields are valid, sends an ajax request to contact-us.php and then shows a success message. The function works, but I'm wondering if this is the ideal way to have this coded (especially with the two (2) return false statements).

Here's part of my code:

$('#contactForm').submit(function(e){ 
    if(validateContactFirstName() && validateContactLastName() && validateContactEmail() && validateContactPhone() && validateContactMessage()) {
                e.preventDefault();
                $('#contactSubmit').button('loading');
                $('#contactSubmit').attr('disabled', 'disabled');
                $.ajax({
                            type    : 'POST',
                            url     : $(this).attr('action'),
                            data    : $(this).serialize(),
                            success : function(data) {
                                            $('.hideOnSuccess').hide();
                                            $('div.contactSuccess').html('<div class="hero-unit"><h1><i class="icon-envelope-alt successIcon"></i> Thanks!</h1><p>An email confirming the details of your message has been sent to your email address. We will respond within one business day. </p></div>');                         
                                            $('html,body').animate({
                                                    scrollTop: 0
                                            }, 800);
                            }
                });
                return false;
        } else {
                return false;
        }
});

Which return false statements can I remove? Or should I take out the preventDefault ?

share|improve this question
    
If you always want to return false;, just put it after the if/else block before the end of the function. –  Andrew Whitaker Jan 8 '13 at 19:20
    
Can you provide the whole block of code with comments on what you're suggesting? Thanks! –  adamdehaven Jan 8 '13 at 19:21
    
It wouldn't be much of an answer. Honestly your code doesn't need any improvement besides the above comment. If it's working fine, why complicate things? –  Andrew Whitaker Jan 8 '13 at 19:25
    
So remove the two return false statements, and just put one before the closing }); ? –  adamdehaven Jan 8 '13 at 19:28
    
Yep, that's about it. –  Andrew Whitaker Jan 8 '13 at 19:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I personally prefer using $.post which is a shorthand of what you're using.

http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.post/

Also, be sure to prevent default for your form submission - would look like this

$('#contactForm').submit(function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    if(validateContactFirstName() && validateContactLastName() && validateContactEmail() && validateContactPhone() && validateContactMessage()) {
                $('#contactSubmit').button('loading');
                $('#contactSubmit').attr('disabled', 'disabled');
                $.ajax({
                            type    : 'POST',
                            url     : $(this).attr('action'),
                            data    : $(this).serialize(),
                            success : function(data) {
                                            $('.hideOnSuccess').hide();
                                            $('div.contactSuccess').html('<div class="hero-unit"><h1><i class="icon-envelope-alt successIcon"></i> Thanks!</h1><p>An email confirming the details of your message has been sent to your email address. We will respond within one business day. </p></div>');                         
                                            $('html,body').animate({
                                                    scrollTop: 0
                                            }, 800);
                            }
                });
     return false;
});
share|improve this answer
    
Do I need the serialize or dataType calls in the code at all? –  adamdehaven Jan 8 '13 at 19:23
    
Also (since he deleted his answer) where would the prevent default go? –  adamdehaven Jan 8 '13 at 19:24
    
You can but don't have to. Scroll down to the examples on the page I linked, should answer your questions. –  Capt Otis Jan 8 '13 at 19:24
    
If you're returning false from the event handler, you don't need e.preventDefault. One or the other will suffice (although they don't do exactly the same thing). –  Andrew Whitaker Jan 8 '13 at 19:25
    
It's actually not working via Ajax now - I've updated my code... what's wrong? –  adamdehaven Jan 8 '13 at 19:37

You can rewrite it with the jQuery Form plugin and provide only the callback.

You can leave only one return false at the end of the function and remove the else.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you look at my EDIT and tell me what I did wrong? Lol –  adamdehaven Jan 8 '13 at 19:40

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