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I am getting -1 from myarray.indexOf(element) even when element appears to be in myarray.

Here's some code snippets:

function createChangeRecord( old_array, new_array ) {
    var nds = new_array.slice(0,new_array.length);
    var el, idx;
    if (...) {
        ...
    } else if ( old_array.length==new_array.length ) {
        for ( var i=0; i<old_array.length; i++ ) {
            el = old_array[i];
            idx = nds.indexOf(el);
            if ( idx!=(-1) ) {
                ...
            } else {
                var a = "el: " + el + "; nds: " + nds + "; nds.indexOf(el): " + nds.indexOf(el);
                alert( a );
                ...
            }
        }
        ...
    }
    ...
}

The alert shows me that nds does indeed contain el but the alert should only fire when idx==-1, which should only be true when nds does not contain el.

I know I haven't given enough information to determine the specific issue in my case, but maybe someone can tell me some general reasons which might cause this behavior?

Responses to a similar question suggested using jQuery inArray() instead of indexOf, but I want to know why indexOf doesn't work. Others suggested that indexOf is for strings, not arrays, but that's not true from the online docs I can find.

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2  
. Others suggested that indexOf is for strings, not arrays, but that's not true from the online docs I can find. indexOf is not supported in all browsers for Arrays. See the MDN Docs. –  epascarello Jan 8 '13 at 19:45
    
I am getting -1 from myarray.indexOf(element) even when element appears to be in myarray. What is element? A string? A DOM Node? A number? –  epascarello Jan 8 '13 at 19:48
    
BTW, you can call Array.slice() with no parameters to copy a whole array, rather than passing 0 and the length. –  Mathletics Jan 8 '13 at 20:02
    
What is the alert telling you idx is? –  Jeremy Jan 8 '13 at 20:09
    
@epascarello, element is a number. –  baixiwei Jan 10 '13 at 16:38

4 Answers 4

Use

nds.indexOf(parseInt(el,10)) 

nds is an array of integers and el is an integer.

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I actually encountered an issue where it wouldn't read an integer from the array even when the value matched. This solved that issue for me (a little roundabout it seems since the original way worked in console.) –  ark3typ3 Mar 14 '14 at 1:50

indexOf does work and does do what you say it does.

For example (to demonstrate from a console):

> a = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8];
  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
> b = a.slice(0,a.length);
  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
> b.indexOf(a[4])
  4

If you're getting this error, it might mean you've mixed up source and destination (the array before the dot is the one being searched), or you have another subtle programming error (like you aren't comparing the array you think you're comparing).

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When you use indexOf(value) on an Array, it returns you the index of the value in the array.

> var testArray = ["a","b","c"];
> testArray.indexOf(1)
-1
> testArray.indexOf("b")
1
> testArray.indexOf("c")
2
> testArray = [10,12,3];
> testArray.indexOf(12)
1

You should check what you get from el with a typeof(el)

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.indexOf() is used for strings, not arrays.

Using regular Javascript you'll have to loop through the array until you find a match, or use the inArray() function of jQuery.

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