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I have an app that is sending serializable objects of varying sizes over a socket connection, and I'd like it to be as scalable as possible. There could also be dozens to even hundreds of connections.

  1. The NetworkStream is coming from a TcpClient that is continuously listening for incoming messages.
  2. I don't want to block a thread with the standard NetworkStream.Read(). This needs to scale. I'm only assuming that Read() blocks, because that's pretty standard behavior for this sort of class, and there's a ReadTimeout property on the class.
  3. I'm not sure if BinaryFormatter just uses Read() or if it does some of the Async stuff for me under the hood. My guess is no.
  4. The TcpClient needs to get a message, read it to the end, then go back to listening for messages.

So it seems like there are too many ways to skin this cat, and I'm not sure what is really going to be the most efficient. Do I:

Simply use the BinaryFormatter to read the NetworkStream?

var netStream = client.GetStream();
var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
var obj = formatter.Deserialize(netStream);

OR Do some magic with the new async/await stuff:

using(var ms = new MemoryStream()) 
{
   var netStream = client.GetStream();
   var buffer = new byte[1028];
   int bytesRead;
   while((bytesRead = await netStream.ReadAsync(buffer, 0, buffer.length)) > 0) {
      ms.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
   }
   var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
   var obj = formatter.Deserialize(ms);
}

OR Similar to the above, only leveraging the new CopyToAsync method:

using(var ms = new MemoryStream()) 
{
   var netStream = client.GetStream();
   await netStream.CopyToAsync(ms); //4096 default buffer.
   var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
   var obj = formatter.Deserialize(ms);
}

OR Something else?

I'm looking for the answer that provides the most scalability/efficiency.

[Note: The above is all PSUEDO-code, given as examples]

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1  
Why don't you try to run your samples and see which one is most efficient? –  svick Jan 8 '13 at 20:58
1  
@svick I think it's not always possible to test that the system is designed correctly. It has to be reviewed by expert eyes. –  usr Jan 8 '13 at 20:59
    
@usr Yeah, but the question here doesn't seem to be about correctness, it's about efficiency. –  svick Jan 8 '13 at 21:01
    
I don't really have a good way to test this under any sort of realistic load. That's the biggest reason I'm asking. I'm hoping to bend the ear of a few seasoned vets to sockets development. I'm trying to avoid a mistake up front. –  Ben Lesh Jan 8 '13 at 21:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The first approach has got a problem with large streams. If you ever going to send large data, that code will blow the application with out of memory exception.

The second approach looks very good - it is asynchronous (meaning you don't use some valuable threads for waiting for read to complete) and it uses chunks of data (this is how you supposed to work with a stream).

So go for the second option, maybe with slight modification - deserialize only chunk of data at a time, don't read the whole thing (unless you absolutely sure about the stream length).

This is what I have in mind (pseudo-code)

using (var networkStream = client.GetStream()) //get access to stream
{
    while(!networkStream.EndOfStream) //still has some data
    {
        var buffer = new byte[1234]; //get a buffer
        await SourceStream.ReadAsync(result, 0, buffer); //read from network there

        //om nom nom buffer     
        Foo obj;
        using(var ms = new MemoryStream()) //process just one chunk
        {
             ms.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
             var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
             obj = formatter.Deserialize(ms);   //desserialise the object        
        } // dispose memory

        //async send obj up for further processing
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What about in a loop, where I'm continuously looping back and telling the client to wait for another message? –  Ben Lesh Jan 8 '13 at 20:42
    
I would follow this approach: async read from the network into small buffer, desserialise, loop and reuse buffer. The problem with this approach is that your object may not be fully constructable, that is some part of it is still being transmitted - this depends on the object and serrialization formats (this can work say for an int array, but will fail if you transmit "a foo" object). –  oleksii Jan 8 '13 at 20:46
    
There is also a CopyToAsync() method that I'm guessing I could use to handle transferring it to a MemoryStream to be handled by the BinaryFormatter. I would assume it handles using an appropriately sized buffer. –  Ben Lesh Jan 8 '13 at 20:48
2  
If using a MemoryStream the entire data will be buffered. It does not matter if it was read/written in chunks. –  usr Jan 8 '13 at 20:49
2  
Are you really saying that letting BinarayFormatter read the stream piece by piece will cause memory problems, but creating one big array (disguised as MemoryStream) won't? That doesn't make any sense to me. –  svick Jan 8 '13 at 21:16

The async/await stuff will allow you to block threads less often when waiting on resources so in general it will scale better than thread blocking versions.

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Async will scale better if there are hundreds of concurrent operations running.

It will be slower serially, though. Async has overhead that is easily detected in benchmarks. Prefer using option 1 if you don't require option 2.

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1  
@blesh in that case strongly prefer option (2). You are on the right track there. Of course, you can use CopyAsync. –  usr Jan 8 '13 at 20:53
1  
I strongly disagree with this answer. The exact opposite is true. If you have 200 threads, then async may not be necessary as other threads would be available to process requests if a thread is blocked. However, imagine if you have only 1 thread. If that single thread is blocked, everything is blocked. Study up NodeJS. NodeJS is a single thread, and its Completely async for this reason. –  Scott Stevens Jan 8 '13 at 21:15
1  
@ScottStevens I think you just misunderstood what this answer is saying. “hundreds of concurrent threads” doesn't mean that hundreds of CPU cores are available, it means hundreds of concurrent operations. –  svick Jan 8 '13 at 21:19
2  
@ScottStevens I believe my poor wording mislead you. I changed "threads" to "operations" in my answer. Having hundreds of threads is to be avoided while having hundreds of (async) operations is not a problem. Work is being done (or at least it is queued) although no threads are being consumed. –  usr Jan 8 '13 at 21:29
1  
@usr I see what you meant. I think in general in a web environment when making requests to external resources its better to err on the side of async if you want your application to be highly scaleable. In general I would lean towards being able to handle more simultaneous requests than putting a little extra pressure on the CPU. –  Scott Stevens Jan 8 '13 at 21:40

I thought it would also be worthwhile to mention that there is a difference between going async vs sync from the client perspective. If you go async... everyone will in general experience the same response time. So if all your requests intensive, everyone will realize slower response times. With sync requests, users with easy requests will be handled much faster as they will not be held up by other users. However, if you have many simultaneous requests in a synchronous environment, eventually its possible that all your threads will be blocked and requests will not get a response.

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