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I'm trying to wrap my mind around the MVP pattern used in a C#/Winforms app. So I created a simple "notepad" like application to try to work out all the details. My goal is to create something that does the classic windows behaviors of open, save, new as well as reflecting the name of the saved file in the title bar. Also, when there are unsaved changes, the title bar should include an *.

So I created a view & a presenter that manage the application's persistence state. One improvement I've considered is breaking out the text handling code so the view/presenter is truly a single-purpose entity.

Here is a screen shot for reference ...

alt text

I'm including all of the relevant files below. I'm interested in feedback about whether I've done it the right way or if there are ways to improve.

NoteModel.cs:

public class NoteModel : INotifyPropertyChanged 
{
    public string Filename { get; set; }
    public bool IsDirty { get; set; }
    string _sText;
    public readonly string DefaultName = "Untitled.txt";

    public string TheText
    {
        get { return _sText; }
        set
        {
            _sText = value;
            PropertyHasChanged("TheText");
        }
    }

    public NoteModel()
    {
        Filename = DefaultName;
    }

    public void Save(string sFilename)
    {
        FileInfo fi = new FileInfo(sFilename);

        TextWriter tw = new StreamWriter(fi.FullName);
        tw.Write(TheText);
        tw.Close();

        Filename = fi.FullName;
        IsDirty = false;
    }

    public void Open(string sFilename)
    {
        FileInfo fi = new FileInfo(sFilename);

        TextReader tr = new StreamReader(fi.FullName);
        TheText = tr.ReadToEnd();
        tr.Close();

        Filename = fi.FullName;
        IsDirty = false;
    }

    private void PropertyHasChanged(string sPropName)
    {
        IsDirty = true;
        PropertyChanged.Invoke(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(sPropName));
    }


    #region INotifyPropertyChanged Members

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    #endregion
}

Form2.cs:

public partial class Form2 : Form, IPersistenceStateView
{
    PersistenceStatePresenter _peristencePresenter;

    public Form2()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    #region IPersistenceStateView Members

    public string TheText
    {
        get { return this.textBox1.Text; }
        set { textBox1.Text = value; }
    }

    public void UpdateFormTitle(string sTitle)
    {
        this.Text = sTitle;
    }

    public string AskUserForSaveFilename()
    {
        SaveFileDialog dlg = new SaveFileDialog();
        DialogResult result = dlg.ShowDialog();
        if (result == DialogResult.Cancel)
            return null;
        else 
            return dlg.FileName;
    }

    public string AskUserForOpenFilename()
    {
        OpenFileDialog dlg = new OpenFileDialog();
        DialogResult result = dlg.ShowDialog();
        if (result == DialogResult.Cancel)
            return null;
        else
            return dlg.FileName;
    }

    public bool AskUserOkDiscardChanges()
    {
        DialogResult result = MessageBox.Show("You have unsaved changes. Do you want to continue without saving your changes?", "Disregard changes?", MessageBoxButtons.YesNo);

        if (result == DialogResult.Yes)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }

    public void NotifyUser(string sMessage)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(sMessage);
    }

    public void CloseView()
    {
        this.Dispose();
    }

    public void ClearView()
    {
        this.textBox1.Text = String.Empty;
    }

    #endregion

    private void btnSave_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        _peristencePresenter.Save();
    }

    private void btnOpen_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        _peristencePresenter.Open();
    }

    private void btnNew_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        _peristencePresenter.CleanSlate();
    }

    private void Form2_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        _peristencePresenter = new PersistenceStatePresenter(this);
    }

    private void Form2_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
    {
        _peristencePresenter.Close();
        e.Cancel = true; // let the presenter handle the decision
    }

    private void textBox1_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        _peristencePresenter.TextModified();
    }
}

IPersistenceStateView.cs

public interface IPersistenceStateView
{
    string TheText { get; set; }

    void UpdateFormTitle(string sTitle);
    string AskUserForSaveFilename();
    string AskUserForOpenFilename();
    bool AskUserOkDiscardChanges();
    void NotifyUser(string sMessage);
    void CloseView();
    void ClearView();
}

PersistenceStatePresenter.cs

public class PersistenceStatePresenter
{
    IPersistenceStateView _view;
    NoteModel _model;

    public PersistenceStatePresenter(IPersistenceStateView view)
    {
        _view = view;

        InitializeModel();
        InitializeView();
    }

    private void InitializeModel()
    {
        _model = new NoteModel(); // could also be passed in as an argument.
        _model.PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(_model_PropertyChanged);
    }

    private void InitializeView()
    {
        UpdateFormTitle();
    }

    private void _model_PropertyChanged(object sender, System.ComponentModel.PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.PropertyName == "TheText")
            _view.TheText = _model.TheText;

        UpdateFormTitle();
    }

    private void UpdateFormTitle()
    {
        string sTitle = _model.Filename;
        if (_model.IsDirty)
            sTitle += "*";

        _view.UpdateFormTitle(sTitle);
    }

    public void Save()
    {
        string sFilename;

        if (_model.Filename == _model.DefaultName || _model.Filename == null)
        {
            sFilename = _view.AskUserForSaveFilename();
            if (sFilename == null)
                return; // user canceled the save request.
        }
        else
            sFilename = _model.Filename;

        try
        {
            _model.Save(sFilename);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            _view.NotifyUser("Could not save your file.");
        }

        UpdateFormTitle();
    }

    public void TextModified()
    {
        _model.TheText = _view.TheText;
    }

    public void Open()
    {
        CleanSlate();

        string sFilename = _view.AskUserForOpenFilename();

        if (sFilename == null)
            return;

        _model.Open(sFilename);
        _model.IsDirty = false;
        UpdateFormTitle();
    }

    public void Close()
    {
        bool bCanClose = true;

        if (_model.IsDirty)
            bCanClose = _view.AskUserOkDiscardChanges();

        if (bCanClose)
        {
            _view.CloseView();
        }
    }

    public void CleanSlate()
    {
        bool bCanClear = true;

        if (_model.IsDirty)
            bCanClear = _view.AskUserOkDiscardChanges();

        if (bCanClear)
        {
            _view.ClearView();
            InitializeModel();
            InitializeView();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
4  
This question is no longer on topic, even though it would have been fine when it was posted. These days questions of this kind would be better on Code Review. –  halfer Feb 6 at 22:07
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closed as off-topic by halfer, Michael Edenfield, Pierre-Luc Pineault, greg-449, Yan Sklyarenko Feb 7 at 8:52

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The only way to get any closer to a perfect MVP passive view pattern would be to write your own MVP triads for the dialogs instead of using the WinForms dialogs. Then you could move the dialog creation logic from the view to the presenter.

This gets into the topic of communication between mvp triads, a topic which is usually glossed over when examining this pattern. What I've found works for me is to connect triads at their presenters.

public class PersistenceStatePresenter
{
    ...
    public Save
    {
        string sFilename;

        if (_model.Filename == _model.DefaultName || _model.Filename == null)
        {
            var openDialogPresenter = new OpenDialogPresenter();
            openDialogPresenter.Show();
            if(!openDialogPresenter.Cancel)
            {
                return; // user canceled the save request.
            }
            else
                sFilename = openDialogPresenter.FileName;

        ...

The Show() method, of course, is responsible for showing an unmentioned OpenDialogView, which would accept the users input and pass it along to the OpenDialogPresenter. In any case, it should be starting to become clear that a presenter is an elaborate middleman. Under different circumstances, you might be tempted to refactor a middleman out but here its is intentional to:

  • Keep logic out of the view, where it is harder to test
  • Avoid direct dependencies between the view and the model

At times I've also seen the model used for MVP triad communication. The benefit of this is the presenter's don't need to know each other exist. Its usually accomplished by setting a state in the model, which triggers an event, which another presenter then listens for. An interesting idea. One I've not used personally.

Here's a few links with some of the techniques others have used to deal with triad communication:

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the feedback. Why did you use var with openDialogPresenter? Do you have any links related to triad communication. I guess my current approach is leaning toward state in the model with events to cause actions in appropriate presenters. Is that a bad idea? –  Keith G Sep 16 '09 at 13:13
    
I tend to use var by default unless there is a valid reason not to, just a personal preference. I updated my answer with a couple of links dealing with MVP triad communication. –  Kenneth Cochran Sep 17 '09 at 19:53
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Everything looks good the only possible level I would go further is to abstract away the logic for saving the file and have that handled by providers so later you could easily flex in alternate saving methods such as database, email, cloud storage.

IMO anytime you deal with touching the file system it's always better to abstract it away a level, also makes mocking and testing alot easier.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, of course. Trying to keep it simple at this stage. –  Keith G Sep 14 '09 at 15:47
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One thing I like to do is get rid of direct View to Presenter communication. The reason for this is the view is at the UI level and the presenter is at the business layer. I don't like my layers to have inherent knowledge of each other, and I seek to limit the direct communication as much as possible. Typically, my model is the only thing that transcends layers. Thus the presenter manipulates the view through the interface, but the view doesn't take much direct action against the presenter. I like the Presenter to be able to listen to and manipulate my view based on reaction, but I also like to limit the knowledge my view has of its presenter.

I'd add some events to my IPersistenceStateView:

event EventHandler Save;
event EventHandler Open;
// etc.

Then have my Presenter listen to those events:

public PersistenceStatePresenter(IPersistenceStateView view)
{
    _view = view;

    _view.Save += (sender, e) => this.Save();
    _view.Open += (sender, e) => this.Open();
   // etc.

   InitializeModel();
   InitializeView();
}

Then change the view implementation to have the button clicks fire the events.

This makes the presenter act more like a puppetmaster, reacting to the view and pulling its strings; therein, removing the direct calls on the presenter's methods. You'll still have to instantiate the presenter in the view, but that's about the only direct work you'll do on it.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this suggestion too. –  Keith G Sep 30 '09 at 14:28
    
@Travis: The problem with that approach, if any, is that control of the view is no longer guaranteed to only be performed by the presenter, since you need to make the events public. –  Johann Gerell Apr 14 '10 at 10:16
    
@Johann: I don't think this is problem at all. It makes the view completely independent, self-contained and unaware of what's controlling it. I find that adds flexibility, allowing you to use the view in different contexts, while still leveraging the MVP pattern. –  Travis Heseman Apr 21 '10 at 1:06
    
I'm talking about the multicast-ness of an event. In your code, there's nothing that indicates who has access to the view, except for the presenter. If someone else has access, then there's no guarantee that the view state seen by the presenter is the same as when the event was raised, since another event handler might have manipulated the view in between. What you seek should more cleanly be done with an event handler interface that is implemented by the presenter, so that only one interface reference is kept in the view and the interface methods are called instead of raising events. –  Johann Gerell Apr 22 '10 at 9:20
    
Something like this: public interface IPersistenceStatePresenter { void Save(); void Open(); } public class PersistenceStatePresenter : IPersistenceStatePresenter { public void Save() {} public void Open() {} } public class PersistenceStateView : IPersistenceStateView { private IPersistenceStatePresenter presenter; private void saveButton_Click(...) { this.presenter.Save(); } private void openButton_Click(...) { this.presenter.Open(); } } –  Johann Gerell Apr 22 '10 at 9:27
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