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*******EDITED*****

I have multiple sql servers with around 200-300 dbs in them and want to save space on my server.


I would like to run a shrink routine on all databases in my sql server by running this script through a task scheduler. I have the queries but I do not know how to connect the two together. For selecting all databases I use this

select * from sys.sysdatabases
Where name <> 'master' and name <> 'tempdb' and name <> 'model' and name <> 'msdb'

For my shrink routeen I use this

USE [single_database_name]
GO
DBCC SHRINKFILE ('single_database_name', 10)
GO

How can I connect the two queries so that the "single_database_name" is coming from the list of all database names from the first query.

Thanks for your help

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use a cursor with dynamic SQL. This will shrink each file individually on each database.

Declare @dataFiles Table (databaseName Varchar(256), datafile Varchar(256))
Declare @SQL Nvarchar(Max), @databaseName Varchar(256), @dbfile Varchar(256)

Insert  @dataFiles
select  sd.name, smf.name
from    sys.sysdatabases sd
join    sys.master_files smf
        On  sd.[dbid] = smf.database_id
Where   sd.name not in ('master','tempdb','model','msdb')

Declare cur Cursor For      
Select  databaseName,
        datafile
From    @dataFiles

Open    cur
Fetch   Next 
From    cur
Into    @databaseName,
        @dbfile

While   @@Fetch_Status = 0
Begin
        Set     @SQL = 'USE [' + @databasename + ']
                        DBCC SHRINKFILE (''' + @dbfile + ''', 10) WITH NO_INFOMSGS'

        Exec    sp_executeSQL @SQL

        Fetch   Next 
        From    cur
        Into    @databaseName,
                @dbfile
End
Close   cur
Deallocate cur

select  sd.name As DatabaseName, smf.name DBFileName, (size*8)/1024 SizeMB
from    sys.sysdatabases sd
join    sys.master_files smf
        On  sd.[dbid] = smf.database_id
Where   sd.name not in ('master','tempdb','model','msdb')
share|improve this answer
    
Are you getting DBCC SHRINKFILE to work on the DB name instead of the filename? –  MarkD Jan 8 '13 at 21:12
    
I just used the syntax the poster used, I didn't actually test it. You would have to first use dynamic SQL to pull all the filenames from the individual database first and then use that information in your cursor or use shrinkdatabase instead. –  Love2Learn Jan 8 '13 at 21:25
    
@Love2Learn is there any chance you could point me in the right direction on how to use dynamic SQL to pull all the filenames from the individual database first and then use that information in the cursor? Where would I find information on shrinkdatabase? –  WillNZ Jan 8 '13 at 21:31
    
I updated the code logic to do this. If you type "ShrinkDatabase" double click it and hit Shift+F1 it should bring up the MS documentation on how to use it. ShrinkDatabase works differently though so it depends on what you're trying to do... what exactly are you trying to do? Shrinking files/databases is a bad idea unless you really need the space. If you do this you can severely impact your database performance if you are constantly adding stuff to it because it will have to auto-grow every time it needs space. –  Love2Learn Jan 8 '13 at 21:38
    
@Love2Learn thanks for that. The reason why I want to Shrink the database is that I have multiple sql servers with around 200-300 dbs in them and want to save space on my server. –  WillNZ Jan 8 '13 at 21:45
select 
'USE '+ quotename([name]) + '
GO
DBCC SHRINKFILE (''' + [name] + ''', 10)
GO
'
from sys.databases
where name not in '(master', 'tempdb', 'model', 'msdb')

But please don't do this: shrinking is bad.

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can you explain a little more why shrinking is bad? I have multiple sql servers with around 200-300 dbs in them and want to save space on my server. –  WillNZ Jan 8 '13 at 21:29
    
sqlskills.com/blogs/paul/… –  Ben Thul Jan 9 '13 at 19:06

Using undocumented stored procedure sp_MSForEachDB and DBCC SHRINKDATABASE command you can shrink all databases on an SQL Server in one line of code

EXEC sp_MSForEachDB
  'if ''?'' not in (select name from sys.databases
    where name <> ''master'' and name <> ''tempdb'' and name <> ''model'' and name <> ''msdb'')
      DBCC SHRINKDATABASE([?], 10)'

More info about sp_MSForEachDB

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Shrinking a database should be avoided except for in very specific situations, like where you delete a large amount of data and the database is never going to grow back to the original size and reclaim the space. Shrinking the database will fragment the data and can cause performance issues.

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for operating on a particular database, you will be have atleast knowledge of the name of the databse, if it is the case then use the following query

if (exists(Select name from sys.databases where name like 'single_database_name'))
begin 
DBCC SHRINKFILE ('single_database_name', 10)
end
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1  
He wants to execute SHRINKFILE on every database name returned by his first query. –  Francis P Jan 8 '13 at 21:06

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