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I am using the app.config to differentiate "preview" vs "production" web service URLs to a remote web app. The WSDL is the same in both preview and production. But when I use a different URL than the one that Visual Studio has in the Web References folder, I get the following error: There is an error in XML document (2, 691).

Here is an example of how I set my code up to use the URL defined in the app settings:

MyNamespace.MyType.MyService ws = new MyNamespace.MyType.MyService()
{
    Url = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["url"]
};

I did a diff between the two WSDLs and the only difference is the targetNamespace attribute on the xsd:schema and the location attribute on the soap:address element.

I have URL Behavior set to Dynamic and I know this is possible because I have done it before with other preview/production apps.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem was that preview and production apps were hosted on two separate servers. Hosting them on the same server (or at least the webservice) allows the namespaces to remain the same and the only difference is the URL.

The webservice used to look like this:

  • Production - http://production.example.com/myapp/webservice.aspx
  • Preview ---- http://preview.example.com/myapp/webservice.aspx

The fix was to host it like this:

  • Production - http://example.com/production/myapp/webservice.aspx
  • Preview ---- http://example.com/preview/myapp/webservice.aspx

If this is not possible, the only other solution I know of is to have two web references, one for production and another for preview. The disadvantage is that your namespaces (and in turn, your types) will be different and most code will need to be duplicated.

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