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If an SplObjectStorage instance destructs while still having some objects attached, does it implicitly detach the objects first, or does a memory leak result by the SplObjectStorage's references to those dangling objects? I'm trying to determine if userland code to "detach anything that's left before destructing" is necessary to prevent such a memory leak.

$storage = new SplObjectStorage();
$x = new stdClass();
$y = new stdClass();
$storage->attach($x);
$storage->attach($y);
$storage = null; 
// did not explicitly detach $x and $y... does $storage's destruction do it?
// or do the zval counts on $x and $y now off by one?
$x = null;
$y = null;
// at this point, are there two dangling references to $x and $y,
// simply because $storage did not dereference from them before destroying itself?
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The simple answer is: it should free those two objects.

If this is not the case, this should be considered a bug.

To test: create a class with a destructor, and ensure that it's called.

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1  
My experiments seem to suggest that explicitly detaching them before destruction leaves fewer zvals around that just destructing SplObjectStorage while attached items remain... but my inexperience reading zval info has me second-guessing myself. –  ashnazg Jan 9 '13 at 14:50

In short: No.

In Long: The moment $storage gets dereferenced it has a so called "refCount" of zero, which means, that there is no reference to this object anymore. Now the next time the garbage collectors runs it will clean up this object and every object referenced from $storage gets their refCount decreased by one. Now exactly the same happens: The GC notices, that there is nothing, that references the ojects and will free them (usually during the same garbage collector cycle, because why not?)

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It's the references to the two stdClass objects that I'm worried about, not the reference to the storage object ;-) –  ashnazg Jan 8 '13 at 22:48
    
@ashnazg Yes I know, but you have to look at the storage object too. To sum it up: As long as a reference to an object exists, the gc doesn't touch it, but if there is no reference anymore, the gc will clean it up and ensures, that no memory leak occurs. As long as $storage exists, there is at least one reference to every containing item. If you remove every reference to $storage it depends on whether or not there exists other references whether or not the items will be freed. –  KingCrunch Jan 9 '13 at 7:55
    
Right with you @KingCrunch :-) My concern is that when $storage destructs, it might still have $x and $y "attached", and therefore $x and $y have one more reference. If $storage's destruction did not implicitly release those references, then they linger after $storage is gone. So, once I later destroy $x and $y, they are the ones lingering as a memory leak, because they each have one dangling reference. So, my question is specifically whether or not $storage takes it upon itself to internally release all remaining "attached" references, if any, during its own destruction cycle. –  ashnazg Jan 9 '13 at 14:49

If this test is structured correctly, it seems to show that detaching items before destruction of storage has no visible difference when compared to destruction of storage while items are still attached. Commenting out the detach() block does not result in any visible changes in the check() output.

<?php
class MyStorage extends SplObjectStorage
{
    public function __destruct()
    {
        echo "__destruct() of ";
        var_dump($this);
        //parent::__destruct();  // there is no SplObjectStorage::__destruct()
    }
}
class Foo
{
    public function __destruct()
    {
        echo "__destruct() of ";
        var_dump($this);
    }
}

function check($message)
{
    global $storage, $x, $y, $z;

    echo $message, ':', PHP_EOL;

    echo '$storage:  ', xdebug_debug_zval('storage');
    echo '$x      :  ', xdebug_debug_zval('x');
    echo '$y      :  ', xdebug_debug_zval('y');
    echo '$z      :  ', xdebug_debug_zval('z');

    echo PHP_EOL, PHP_EOL;
}

check("Starting environment");

$storage = new MyStorage();
check("\$storage created");
$x = new Foo();
check("\$x created");
$y = new Foo();
check("\$y created");
$z = new Foo();
check("\$z created");

$storage->attach($x);
$storage->attach($y);
$storage->attach($z);
check("Everything is attached");

// comment out this detach() block for comparison testing
$storage->detach($x);
$storage->detach($y);
$storage->detach($z);
check("Everything is detached");

// the check() output here is key for comparing with the final check() output below

$storage = null;
check("$storage destructed");

$x = null;
check("$x destructed");

$y = null;
check("$y destructed");

$z = null;
check("$z destructed");

// final check() output appears here

I think my self confusion was created when I did write explicit userland detach() steps in my class where I use an SplObjectStorage object. I think the iteration issue that seems to be highlighted by PHP Bug #63917 [1] is actually the only buggy issue, which first made me suspect a bug with the destruct-with-attachments scenario.

[1] -- http://bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=63917

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