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I am new to jQuery and I may be going about this the wrong way. I am trying to target a div that has been toggled. The first event handler works fine (open), but I am unable to get the second to work (close). Any help would be greatly appreciated.

$(".entry .tog").unbind();
  $(".entry .tog").click(function(){
        $(this).closest(".entry").toggleClass("entry-active entry");
        $(".entry").toggleClass("entry not-active");

        alert("open");
})

$(".entry-active .tog").unbind();
  $(".entry-active .tog").click(function(){
        $(this).closest(".entry-active").toggleClass("entry-active entry");
        $(".not-active").toggleClass("not-active entry");

        alert("close");
    })
});
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Can you add a JSFiddle? –  Wolf Jan 8 '13 at 22:17
    
What's the purpose of your unbindings? –  Sebastian vom Meer Jan 8 '13 at 22:17
    
To toggle, you typically need only one class and one click handler. For sure, you can toggle more than one class but, for the same collection of elements, you still only need one click handler. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Jan 8 '13 at 22:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I expect that you're trying to achieve this :

$(".entry .tog").off('click').on('click', function() {
    var $entry = $(this).closest(".entry").toggleClass("active");
    $(".entry").not($entry).removeClass("active");
    alert($entry.hasClass('active') ? "active" : "not active");
});

Notes:

  • There's no point having two classes working in antiphase. In every respect, whether it is CSS styling or jQuery selection, one class will suffice.
  • You don't want to toggle class entry. If you did, the first time entry was toggled off (ie. the class was removed) the elements would become unselectable again with $(".entry"). One day, that might be desirable but not here, I suspect.
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Great! it worked perfectly. Thank you for the notes as well. –  Randall987 Jan 8 '13 at 22:49
    
Randall, if you're happy with the answer it's protocol to accept it. There's a checkbox or button or something somewhere on the page, which only you can see. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Jan 8 '13 at 22:52
    
All of these are points I'd really underscore, and personally I think it should be the accepted answer. I explained why what was tried breaks the way it does in my answer, but I want to emphasize that this is a much better overall approach and mine is structured more towards teaching about event binding issues =) –  taswyn Jan 8 '13 at 23:05

Wouldn't this code just set it active and then not active.

$(this).closest(".entry").toggleClass("entry-active entry");
$(".entry").toggleClass("entry not-active");
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I'm not really sure I see a point to your unbinds, especially since they are only going to run once (they aren't attached to any event handlers or anything else from what you posted).

I tend to agree with @Beetroot-Beetroot's answer in regards to not trying to force them to toggle against each other. But in terms of learning, I'll point out the underlying issue with what you tried to do.


Your basic issue is that you are binding directly on these elements at runtime. What happens is once your click binds are set, that is it: even if you change the classes attached to these divs, the binds themselves are still attached to those same elements. Which basically means only your first event handler ever attached to anything, because there wasn't anything matching the second event handler at the time you called it. And even after your first event handler runs and switches the classes, it's still the one (and only one) attached to everything.

Hopefully that made sense.

Here is a fiddle showing what you wrote and how it breaks

What you need to do is use event bubbling: you can attach your event handler to an element that encapsulates these and is not dynamic, and then make decisions based on the dynamic properties of whatever the handler actually got called on.

The method for doing this is to use .on() (see the documentation)

Here is a working fiddle using .on with the following script:

$('.wrapper').on('click', ".entry .tog", function() {
    $(this).closest(".entry").toggleClass("entry-active entry");
    $(".entry").toggleClass("entry not-active");

    alert("open");
});


$('.wrapper').on('click', ".entry-active .tog", function() {
    $(this).closest(".entry-active").toggleClass("entry-active entry");
    $(".not-active").toggleClass("not-active entry");

    alert("close");
});

Basically I created a .wrapper class that I attached to a div holding all of the entries and togs. I bound the .on() event handler to that, with one binding having a selector of the first set of classes, and then another binding having the second set.

I'd still recommend @Beetroot-Beetroot's answer, but hopefully this helps you understand what happened here, why it didn't work, and how to solve similar issues in the future.

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