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Well, it is technically possible, but would this break the MVC architecture?

I'm not sure whether this type of communication is recommended between both controller and model. I will describe it using a simple example and two ways of doing it:

OPTION 1 (model throws exception and controller catches it):

class Controller {
  private $model;

  public function save($data) {
     try {
         $this->model->save($data); 
     } catch (Exception $e) {  
         // handle exception
     }
  }
}

class Model {
  public function save($data) {
     // Call to internal function to save data in BD
     if (! $this->_save($data)) throw new Exception('Error saving data');
  }
}

OPTION 2 (the controller handles the exception completely):

class Controller {
  private $model;

  public function save($data) {
     try {
         if (! $this->model->save($data)) throw new Exception('Error saving data'); 
     } catch (Exception $e) { 
         // handle exception
     }
  }
}

class Model {
  public function save($data) {
     // Call to internal function to save data in BD
     if (! $this->_save($data)) return false;
  }
}

**

EDIT after some responses:

**

These are other ways to solve it based on your suggestions. I hope not to get things too complicated.

OPTION 3 (model handles the exception completely, as Ray said. KingCrunch also suggested to better do it in the model)

class Controller {
  private $model;

  public function save($data) {

     if (! $this->model->save($data)) {
         // possible action: redirect to the form with an error message
     }

  }
}

class Model {
  public function save($data) {
     try {
         if (! $this->_save($data)) throw new Exception('Error saving data'); 
     } catch (Exception $e) { 
         // handle exception
         return false;
     }
     return true; 
  }
}

OPTION 4 (controller gets a custom child exception thrown by the model, as shiplu.mokadd.im said.)

class Controller {
  private $model;

  public function save($data) {
     try {
         $this->model->save($data); 
     } catch (Exception $e) {  
         if ($e instanceof ValidationException) {
            // handle validation error
         }
         elseif ($e instanceof DBStorageException) {
            // handle DB error
         }
     }
  }
}

class Model {
  public function save($data) {
     if (! $this->_validate($data)) {
        throw new ValidationException ('Validation error');
     }
     if (! $this->_save($data)) {
        throw new DBStorageException ('Storage error');
     }
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why are you throwing an exception in your model? Is this for validation? –  Jason Huntley Jan 8 '13 at 22:29
    
It's one of the choices I described. I was trying to be short, but it could either be data validation, database storage, or both. –  Luis Martin Jan 8 '13 at 22:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Model can throw Exception and Controller or View should catch it. Otherwise you never know if everything is working properly down there. So use the first option. But make sure you are throwing properly abstracted Exception that is meaningful to the controller and View.

To illustrate the above bold line see these two throw statements which are used inside a model.

 throw new Exception('SQL Error: '.$mysqli->error()); // dont use it
 throw new DuplicateFieldException('Duplicate username'); // use this

The second example does not show internal error. Rather it hides it. Controller should never know whats happening inside.

In your code your tied a single model to a single controller. Controller does not represent a single model. It uses model. And it can use any number of model. So dont tie up a single model with a controller with variable like private $model.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, that was a short example. I wasn't trying to focus on how many models a controller could handle. Just the communication between them. I was trying to be brief. :) –  Luis Martin Jan 8 '13 at 22:25
    
Yes. But that code reflects a wrong design –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 8 '13 at 22:27
    
are you sure? I could implement an application in which I only needed a model for the current controller. In this case, a single variable to point to the model instance should be enough. –  Luis Martin Jan 8 '13 at 22:32
    
Yes I am sure. Controller should not be tied up with single model. Controller is not a model interface. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 8 '13 at 22:38
    
this edited line confuses me a bit: make sure you are throwing properly abstracted Exception that is meaningful to the controller and View. Could you explain it in more detail please? –  Luis Martin Jan 8 '13 at 23:02

Definitely first option. Some words:

  • It's the job of a Controller to ... well, control. This means, that it should take care, that at least an useful error message appears. Other parts of the application may do it before, when they are able to handle the exceptional case. That includes the model itself: If it is able to handle it, it should do it.

  • save() means "save". Don't misuse the return value for status information. When the method is not able to save() it is an exception and when a method doesn't have to give you something, then it shouldn't give you something.

share|improve this answer
    
So, if I'm not wrong, in 1st point you mean that as long as the model cannot handle the exception itself (which I understand would be the best way) then it should fall back on the controller, and the exception should be hanled (caught) within it while the model would still throw it. However I understand that I shouldn't ever rely any validation on the controller: for example, it's a bad practice if the model fails on saving data in DB, then it notifies the controller with a simple FALSE, and then the controller throws and catches the exception. –  Luis Martin Jan 8 '13 at 22:48

I prefer option 3.

The Model should catch the exception, try to resolve it, if not percolate it up to the controller but only if it's something the controller could address and recover from. In this case, (some kind of DB save failure) catching it in the model returning false should be adequate resolution for the save error and provide enough for the Controller to know something went wrong when saving.

The controller should not need to worry about implementation details on how the model implements saving.

share|improve this answer
    
hello Ray, a modified version of my example would help me grasp what you mean :) –  Luis Martin Jan 8 '13 at 22:37
    
I've just extended the question including your suggestion. –  Luis Martin Jan 8 '13 at 23:37
    
@LuisMartin I now prefer #3 for this specific example (saving to a db a model) There are times you'd legitimately want to bubble up an exception to the controller, I just don't think this is one where a false return value would not suffice. –  Ray Jan 9 '13 at 14:08
    
Thank you! Now I have a dilemma: which answer to mark as the accepted. All of them have been helpful, but I'm not sure which one to choose as the best one. –  Luis Martin Jan 9 '13 at 15:14
    
@LuisMartin Mine of course ;) –  Ray Jan 9 '13 at 15:48

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