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Using optparse, I want to separate the list of option list parameters from the place where I call add_option(). How do I package the stuff up in File A (and then unpack in file B) so that this will work? The parser_options.append() lines will not work as written...

File A:

import file_b
parser_options = []
parser_options.append(('-b', '--bootcount', type='string', dest='bootcount', default='', help='Number of times to repeat booting and testing, if applicable'))
parser_options.append(('-d', '--duration', type='string', dest='duration', default='', help='Number of hours to run the test.  Decimals OK'))

my_object = file_b.B(parser_options)

File B recieves parser_options as input:

import optparse
class B:
    def __init__(self, parser_options):
        self.parser = optparse.OptionParser('MyTest Options')
        if parser_options:
            for option in parser_options: 
                self.parser.add_option(option)

* EDIT: Fixed to use ojbects

share|improve this question
1  
import file_A? What is the flow of control? – StoryTeller Jan 9 '13 at 0:33
    
Where is build_parser() called? – millimoose Jan 9 '13 at 0:36
    
This is just a snippet because there are objects involved and that would be a lot to post. I'm just trying to give the flavor of the problem. I need to pass these parser_options from one object to another. – David Lynch Jan 9 '13 at 0:39
    
Note: Using optparse is discouraged since python version 2.7. The optparse module is deprecated and will not be developed further; development will continue with the argparse module. See PEP 0389 for more info. – shakaran Apr 3 '13 at 23:53
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Rather than try to shoehorn your options into some data structure, wouldn't it be simpler to define a function in file A that adds options to a parser you give it?

File A:

def addOptions(parser):
    parser.add_option('-b', '--bootcount', type='string', dest='bootcount', default='', help='Number of times to repeat booting and testing, if applicable')
    parser.add_option('-d', '--duration', type='string', dest='duration', default='', help='Number of hours to run the test.  Decimals OK')

File B:

import optparse
def build_parser(parser_options):
    parser = optparse.OptionParser('MyTest Options')
    if parser_options:
        parser_options(parser)

elsewhere:

import file_a
import file_b
file_b.build_parser(file_a.addOptions)
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that would be simpler, but I am passing the parser_options to an object at construction as the parse needs to happen in init. So there is nothing in the object that I can call before it is constructed. – David Lynch Jan 9 '13 at 0:38
    
Functions are values too. I'll edit to be more complete. – Phil Frost Jan 9 '13 at 0:40
    
I updated the example to show the problem...I don't have a file C that imports them both – David Lynch Jan 9 '13 at 0:50
    
There's no reason it has to be in a separate file. You can do the "elsewhere" bit in file a just as well, without importing file_a. – Phil Frost Jan 9 '13 at 0:59

The problem you have is that you're trying to pass keyword arguments in a tuple. The code ('-b', '--bootcount', type='string', dest='bootcount', default='', help='Number of times to repeat booting and testing, if applicable') is only legal in a function call, not anywhere else. The type='string' bits are not legal in a tuple!

If you want to pass function arguments around, you need to use a list or tuple for the positional arguments and a dictionary for the keyword arguments. Here's one way you can do that by changing your single tuple for a tuple containing an args tuple and a kwargs dictionary:

parser_options = []
parser_options.append((('-b', '--bootcount'),
                       dict(type='string', dest='bootcount', default='',
                            help='Number of times to repeat booting and testing, if applicable')))
parser_options.append((('-d', '--duration'),
                       dict(type='string', dest='duration', default='',
                            help='Number of hours to run the test.  Decimals OK')))

In your other file, you can pass the contents of the tuple and dict to the appropriate function using the * and ** operators to unpack the arguments:

class B:
    def __init__(self, parser_options)
        self.parser = optparse.OptionParser('MyTest Options')
        if parser_options:
            for args, kwargs in parser_options: 
                self.parser.add_option(*args, **kwargs)
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that was the struct I was looking for. You answered the question that I was ultimately asking, and Phil Frost helped me find a more straightforward way to do what I was trying to do. Thanks! – David Lynch Jan 9 '13 at 15:19

I ended up passing the parser to the object at construction, which is nice because I can name it from the calling module:

import optparse
parser = optparse.OptionParser('My Diagnostics')
parser.add_option('-p', '--pbootcount', type='string', dest='pbootcount', default='testing1234', help=' blah blah')
c = myobject.MyObject(parser)
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