Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Once I worked for a big tech company. We programed in Java. Guys there are amazingly smart and they like simulating struct in C/C++ in Java. To make myself clear, they advocate to create classes that act as "data holder":

public class BookInformation {
    public final List<String> authors;
    public final String bookTitle;
    public BookInformation(List<String> authors, String bookTitle) {
        this.authors = authors;
        this.bookTitle = bookTitle;
    }
    @Override
    public String toString() { ... }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() { ... }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) { ... }
}

As we can see, the purpose of this class is simply holding data. Although we violate many enterprise programming rules, such as not exposing class fields directly and defensive copying, this kind of class does gain benefits such as concise coding. Instead of calling getters and setters, we can directly call field names.

The thing that annoys me is that this kind of class is hard to maintain and extend. It is hard to maintain because there is no way to make sure the states of the objects are legal. Business logic may say, a book must have a title and at least one author. But in real world, the objects can have empty title, null title, empty author list or null author list and we simply cannot control it. It is hard to extend. For example, what if the data source is changed to provide first name, last name separately for author name? I have to use two string lists instead of one. Worse, the data structure change affects and interface. Since I don't have a getAuthorNames() interface, I potentially have to change codes in many places.

I have to admit that the above scenarios are not happening. I have to admit that all code uses the class is under the control of the team so interface change doesn't sound that bad as writing for other teams/companies to use. So is it OK to have such coding standard even if we are using Java, a pure OO language, coding in enterprise level?

I know there probably isn't a "right" answer. I'd like to hear personal opinions. Speak loud on behalf of yourself!

EDIT:

OK. I should rephrase the core of my question: is it wise to sacrifice some of the textbook coding rules to gain simplicity? Will the sacrifice bit you later when the code base grows and team grows? Personal opinions matter, especially it is from wise persons and in many cases, there isn't right or wrong questions and we all just follow the convincing opinions. I am sorry Stackoverflow is designed only for right-and-wrong questions. In that case this question should just be closed.

share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by Dave Newton, Jonathan, glts, walther, Luc M Oct 23 '13 at 14:21

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I don't think this a good fit for Stackoverflow. Stackoverflow is for questions with an objective answer, not "personal opinions". And besides, how would our personal opinions benefit you? How would you know that our experiences are representative of your situation? –  meriton Jan 9 '13 at 1:45
    
You dont have to emulate a C struct, you can emulate a C++ struct and add helper functions like getAuthorNames if you like. Also remember that Java objects are reference types, unlike C/C++/C# structs –  Karthik T Jan 9 '13 at 1:46
    
Your question is also very broad. Is it about public fields? The lack of defensive copying? Parallel class hierarchies? The appropriate place to perform validation? Unstable interfaces? –  meriton Jan 9 '13 at 1:49

2 Answers 2

I think there's a right answer: If it works for you, go for it. There are no style cops waiting to arrest you.

Know the rules and the reasons behind them. When you break them, understand the consequences. Have good justifications for what you do. Live with what happens.

For example, I don't think the rule to never expose data in public need be absolute - as long as you do it properly.

You need to realize that you did it wrong.

The fact that you made that List reference final just means that the reference can't be changed. The List that the reference refers to can have elements added and removed. You have to make it immutable to achieve what you want.

If you don't make it immutable, the changes you make to the reference you pass into the constructor will be reflected in your object. This would be true even if you made that reference private. You have to make a copy of the List you pass in to make your object's state truly independent. Same with other references to mutable types, like Date.

It works with String because it's immutable.

One more thing: that should be equals(), not Equals(). Case matters in Java.

public final class BookInformation {
    public final List<String> authors;
    public final String bookTitle;
    public final Date publicationDate;

    public BookInformation(List<String> authors, String bookTitle, Date publicationDate) {
        this.authors = Collections.unmodifiableList((authors == null) ? new ArrayList<String>() : authors);
        this.bookTitle = (StringUtils.isBlank(bookTitle) ? "" : bookTitle);
        this.publicationDate = ((publicationDate == null) ? new Date() : new Date(publicationDate.getTime()));
    }
    @Override
    public String toString() { ... }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() { ... }

    @Override

   public boolean equals(Object obj) { ... }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are right. Rules are there just to let you know the consequences. It may be fine if you clearly know the consequences and would like to take the responsibilities. Hmm... –  Steve Jan 9 '13 at 2:21

I find the standard getter/setters to be needlessly verbose sometimes but there are ways around this.

For example, you can use a getter or setters which is the same name as the fields and you can create operation methods which are more concise than accessing the fields directly.

e.g.

public class BookInformation {
    private final Set<String> authors = new LinkedHashSet<>();
    private final String bookTitle;

    public BookInformation(List<String> authors, String bookTitle) {
        assert authors != null;
        assert bookTitle != null;

        for(String author: authors) addAuthor(author);
        this.bookTitle = bookTitle;
    }

    public String bookTitle() { return bookTitle; }

    // get all the authors without needing a defensive copy.
    // for(int i = 0, len = bookInfo.authorCount(); i < len; i++) {
    //     String name = bookInfo.author(i);

    public int authorCount() { return authors.size(); }
    public String author(int n) { return authors.get(n); }

    public void addAuthor(String name) {
        assert name != null
        authors.add(name);
    }

class AuthorCounter {
    private final ConcurrentMap<String, AtomicInteger> authorCountMap =
                  new ConcurrentHashMap<>();

    public void addAuthor(String name) {
        authorCountMap.putIfAbsent(name, new AtomicInteger());
    }

    public void incrCountFor(String name) {
        authorCountMap.get(name).incrementAndGet();
    }

    public int countForAuthor(String name) {
        AtomicInteger ai = authorCountMap.get(name);
        return ai == null ? 0 : ai.get();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.