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Array value count javascript

I have an array which contains several duplicates, what I'm trying to achieve is to count how many duplicates each unique string has in this one array.

The array looks something like this

array = ['aa','bb','cc','aa','ss','aa','bb'];

Thus I would like to do something like this

if (xWordOccurrences >= 5) {
    // do something
}

But I'm not sure how I would code this. I was thinking, create an object with each unique string, then loop through the original array, match each string with it's object and increment it's number by 1, then loop over the object to see which words had the most duplicates...

But this seems like an over complexe way to do it.

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marked as duplicate by Michael Berkowski, asgoth, Rais Alam, Ridcully, evilone Jan 9 '13 at 6:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
duplicates of specific string, or count any duplications? –  charlietfl Jan 9 '13 at 3:49
    
@charlietfl count duplicates –  Mint Jan 9 '13 at 3:53
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7 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use an object which has keys of the Array's values and do something like this

// count everything
function getCounts(arr) {
    var i = arr.length, // var to loop over
        obj = {}; // obj to store results
    while (i) obj[arr[--i]] = (obj[arr[i]] || 0) + 1; // count occurrences
    return obj;
}

// get specific from everything
function getCount(word, arr) {
    return getCounts(arr)[word] || 0;
}

getCount('aa', ['aa','bb','cc','aa','ss','aa','bb']);
// 3

If you only ever want to get one, then it'd be more a bit more efficient to use a modified version of getCounts which looks similar to getCount, I'll call it getCount2

function getCount2(word, arr) {
    var i = arr.length, // var to loop over
        j = 0; // number of hits
    while (i) if (arr[--i] === word) ++j; // count occurance
    return j;
}

getCount2('aa', ['aa','bb','cc','aa','ss','aa','bb']);
// 3
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+1 Though personally I'm not a fan of the increment/decrement operators and single statement (instead of block) while and if. –  ErikE Jan 9 '13 at 4:39
    
I've been told I have a "very C way" of writing my loops, before. I try to avoid using i = i + 1 inside of single statements because it gets even more complicated. –  Paul S. Jan 9 '13 at 4:43
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Try this function:

var countOccurrences = function(arr,value){
    var len = arr.length;
    var occur = 0;
    for(var i=0;i<len;i++){
        if(arr[i]===value){
            occur++;
        }
    }
    return occur;
}

var count = countOccurrences(['aaa','bbb','ccc','bbb','ddd'],'bbb');    //2

If you want, you can also add this function to the Array prototype:

Array.prototype.countOccurrences = function(value){
    var len = this.length;
    var occur = 0;
    for(var i=0;i<len;i++){
        if(this[i]===value){
            occur++;
        }
    }
    return occur;
}
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<script type="text/javascript">

    var array = ['aa','bb','cc','aa','ss','aa','bb'];

    var myMap = {};

    for(i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
        var count = myMap[array[i]];
        if(count != null) {
            count++;
        } else {
            count = 1;
        }
        myMap[array[i]] = count;
    }

    // at this point in the script, the map now contains each unique array item and a count of its entries

</script>
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Hope this solves your problem

var array = ['aa','bb','cc','aa','ss','aa','bb'];
var dups = {};

for (var i = 0, l = array.length; i < l; i++ ) {
  dups[array[i]] = []; 
}

for (str in dups) {
  for (var i = 0, l = array.length; i < l; i++ ) {
    if (str === array[i]) {
      dups[str].push(str); 
    }
  }
}

for (str in dups) {
  console.log(str + ' has ' + (dups[str].length - 1) + ' duplicate(s)');
}
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This function may do everything you need.

function countDupStr(arr, specifier) {
    var count = {}, total = 0;
    arr.forEach(function (v) {
        count[v] = (count[v] || 0) + 1;
    });

    if(typeof specifier !== 'undefined') {
        return count[specifier] - 1;
    }

    Object.keys(count).forEach(function (k) {
        total += count[k] - 1;
    });

    return total;
}

Each value in the array is assigned and incremented to the count object. Whether or not a specifier was passed, the function will return duplicates of that specific string or the total number of duplicates. Note that this particular technique will only work on string-coercible values inside your arrays, as Javascript can only index objects by string.

What this means is that during object assignment, the keys will normalize down to strings and cannot be relied upon for uniqueness. That is to say, this function wouldn't be able to discern the difference between duplicates of 3 and '3'. To give an example, if I were to perform:

var o = {}, t = {};
o[t] = 1;
console.log(o);

The key used in place of t would eventually be t.toString(), thus resulting in the perhaps surprising object of {'[object Object]': 1}. Just something to keep in mind when working with Javascript properties.

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How about you build an object with named property?

var array = ['aa','bb','cc','aa','ss','aa','bb'];

var summary = {};
var item = '';
for ( i in array){
    item = array[i];
    if(summary[item]){
        summary[item] += 1;
    }
    else{
        summary[item] = 1;
    }
}
console.log( summary );

summary will contain like this

{aa: 3, bb: 2, cc: 1, ss: 1}

which you could then iterate on and then sort them later on if needed.

finally to get your count, you could use this summary['aa']

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FYI there is no "named array". That's just a plain old JavaScript Object. –  ErikE Jan 9 '13 at 4:28
    
@ErikE ah yes. I meant to say object with named properties. –  fedmich Jan 9 '13 at 4:30
    
Fair enough, though all objects in JavaScript have named properties. –  ErikE Jan 9 '13 at 4:34
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