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Say I connect an IBAction with a button in xib file. When the app runs, I tap the button, would the action be called synchronously or this puts a performSelector request on runloop?

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Set a breakpoint in your action. Tap the button, then look at the methods in the backtrace that are calling your action. Does it look like it was called synchronously by that code, or does it look like it was called by a delayed performSelector? –  Kurt Revis Jan 9 '13 at 6:14
    
@KurtRevis I think it is async,also it "look like" async, I just want to make sure so I'm asking here. –  CarmeloS Jan 9 '13 at 7:55

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It's synchronous.

In an iOS application, the backtrace looks like:

frame #0: 0x000025d2 MyApp`-[ViewController myAction:] + 34 at ViewController.m:31
frame #1: 0x010e2705 libobjc.A.dylib`-[NSObject performSelector:withObject:withObject:] + 77
frame #2: 0x00019920 UIKit`-[UIApplication sendAction:to:from:forEvent:] + 96
frame #3: 0x000198b8 UIKit`-[UIApplication sendAction:toTarget:fromSender:forEvent:] + 61
frame #4: 0x000da671 UIKit`-[UIControl sendAction:to:forEvent:] + 66
frame #5: 0x000dabcf UIKit`-[UIControl(Internal) _sendActionsForEvents:withEvent:] + 578
frame #6: 0x000d9d38 UIKit`-[UIControl touchesEnded:withEvent:] + 546
frame #7: 0x0004933f UIKit`-[UIWindow _sendTouchesForEvent:] + 846
frame #8: 0x00049552 UIKit`-[UIWindow sendEvent:] + 273
frame #9: 0x000273aa UIKit`-[UIApplication sendEvent:] + 436
frame #10: 0x00018cf8 UIKit`_UIApplicationHandleEvent + 9874
frame #11: 0x01becdf9 GraphicsServices`_PurpleEventCallback + 339
frame #12: 0x01becad0 GraphicsServices`PurpleEventCallback + 46
frame #13: 0x01c06bf5 CoreFoundation`__CFRUNLOOP_IS_CALLING_OUT_TO_A_SOURCE1_PERFORM_FUNCTION__ + 53
frame #14: 0x01c06962 CoreFoundation`__CFRunLoopDoSource1 + 146
frame #15: 0x01c37bb6 CoreFoundation`__CFRunLoopRun + 2118
frame #16: 0x01c36f44 CoreFoundation`CFRunLoopRunSpecific + 276
frame #17: 0x01c36e1b CoreFoundation`CFRunLoopRunInMode + 123
frame #18: 0x01beb7e3 GraphicsServices`GSEventRunModal + 88
frame #19: 0x01beb668 GraphicsServices`GSEventRun + 104
frame #20: 0x0001665c UIKit`UIApplicationMain + 1211
frame #21: 0x00001f62 MyApp`main + 130 at main.m:16
frame #22: 0x00001e95 MyApp`start + 53

This is straight-ahead synchronous code. The application receives a touch-ended event, figures out where to dispatch it (the button), and sends a message to the target of the button.

In contrast, a method called asynchronously, via -[NSObject performSelector:withObject:afterDelay:], has a backtrace like this:

frame #0: 0x00002628 MyApp`-[ViewController myAsyncAction:] + 24 at ViewController.m:37
frame #1: 0x00acce83 Foundation`__NSFireDelayedPerform + 380
frame #2: 0x01c50376 CoreFoundation`__CFRUNLOOP_IS_CALLING_OUT_TO_A_TIMER_CALLBACK_FUNCTION__ + 22
frame #3: 0x01c4fe06 CoreFoundation`__CFRunLoopDoTimer + 534
frame #4: 0x01c37a82 CoreFoundation`__CFRunLoopRun + 1810
frame #5: 0x01c36f44 CoreFoundation`CFRunLoopRunSpecific + 276
frame #6: 0x01c36e1b CoreFoundation`CFRunLoopRunInMode + 123
frame #7: 0x01beb7e3 GraphicsServices`GSEventRunModal + 88
frame #8: 0x01beb668 GraphicsServices`GSEventRun + 104
frame #9: 0x0001665c UIKit`UIApplicationMain + 1211
frame #10: 0x00001f62 MyApp`main + 130 at main.m:16
frame #11: 0x00001e95 MyApp`start + 53

You can clearly see that a timer fires and calls its callback, and the "delayed perform" built on top of that is triggered.

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Thank you, but I think performSelector is async regardless whether it has a delay argument. performSelector is picked up by runloop, not a direct jump instruction on CPU, that's what I say async, maybe we have some misunderstanding. –  CarmeloS Jan 9 '13 at 9:28
    
Which exact performSelector method are you talking about? -[NSObject performSelector:], and the variants with one or two object arguments, happen synchronously, without going through the run loop. "The performSelector: method is equivalent to sending an aSelector message directly to the receiver." -[NSObject performSelector:withObject:afterDelay:] happens asynchronously (when triggered by the run loop). –  Kurt Revis Jan 9 '13 at 10:38
    
many thanks to you, I finally understand it. performSelector is defined in NSObject protocol and performSelector:afterDelay is in NSObject class. –  CarmeloS Jan 9 '13 at 10:47
    
Also notice that the event handling itself is asynchronous and relies on runloop.In fact my problem is like this, say I have two buttons, either of them is connected to an IBAction, and I want this: when user taps one button, disable the other. When user taps so fast that before runloop handle the first- tap-event, the second-tap-event is generated. So simply setting the enabled property of another button in IBAction is not totally safe, especially when there are a lot of work in IBAction and makes the runloop take long time every pass. I'm now using a ivar as mutax to solve this problem. –  CarmeloS Jan 10 '13 at 8:24
    
sorry for that I didn't make my problem clear at the beginning. –  CarmeloS Jan 10 '13 at 8:24

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