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I am trying to write a recursive algorithm in C++ that evaluates an expression of the type: "operator" "variable" "variable" and returns the operation (example: input = + 3 4; output = 7). The operators are only the basic ones (+, -, *, /) and the variables are integers between 1 and 9. The problem is that I don't know how to start and what method to use. I can't use stacks or lists.

EDIT: I am studying for an exam of a introduction to C++ so I'm not allowed to use any complex method to solve the problem I only can use procedures, loops, recursivity and search and thread methods.

Thanks.

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1  
No need for recursion here, although you probably phrased the problem incorrectly. –  Pubby Jan 9 '13 at 5:37
    
I guess it's one of these "Implement X, but you can't use Y, Z, ..." exercises. –  Spook Jan 9 '13 at 5:51
1  
@Pubby with no (explicitly-declared) stack data structure, how is this possible without function recursion? –  Potatoswatter Jan 9 '13 at 5:52
    
the recursion is need for more complex expressions such as "* - 2 8 + 3 4" which is equal to "(2-8)*(3+4)" –  Buradi Jan 9 '13 at 5:54
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closed as not a real question by Oli Charlesworth, K-ballo, perreal, billz, BЈовић Jan 9 '13 at 6:04

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4 Answers

Since you're (apparently) dealing only with binary operators, this is pretty trivial (with one caveat: although it won't use a stack explicitly, almost any sane implementation of recursion will use a stack implicitly).

The basic pattern looks something like this:

int apply(char op, int a, int b) {
    switch (op) { 
       case '+': return a + b;
       case '-': return a - b;
       case '/': return a / b;
       case '*': return a * b;
       default: throw bad_operator(op);
    }
}   

int expression(char *&input) {
    char op = *input++;

    if (isdigit(op)) 
       return op - '0';

    int a = expression(input);
    int b = expression(input);
    return apply(op, a, b);
}

Quick test program:

#include <ctype.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <exception>
#include <string>

struct bad_operator : public std::logic_error { 
    bad_operator(char ch)  : 
        std::logic_error(std::string("Bad operator: ") + ch) 
    {}
};

int main() {
    char *input="+/42-43";
    std::cout << expression(input);
    return 0;
}
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+1 but please s/operator/op/g ;) –  Potatoswatter Jan 9 '13 at 5:54
    
that works but i can't use templates nor classes, thanks anyway –  Buradi Jan 9 '13 at 5:58
1  
There are no templates nor classes in the previous example. –  Spook Jan 9 '13 at 6:11
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Try it this way. Pseudocode:

double Process(Parser & parser)
{
    Token token = parser.GetToken();

    if (token.Type == number)
        return (NumberToken)token.value;
    else if (token.Type == operator)
    {
        double left = Process(parser);
        double right = Process(parser);

        switch (OperatorToken)token.op:
        {
        case '+' :
            {
                return left + right;
            }
        // ...
        }
    }
}

This kind of problems is more easily solvable using stack, though.

share|improve this answer
    
can't use tokens, but thanks anyway –  Buradi Jan 9 '13 at 5:59
    
This is a pseudocode. Token may be a char, for instance. Depends on implementation. –  Spook Jan 9 '13 at 6:12
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Here's a solution using recursion (no whitespace allowed in the expression):

#include <cstdio>

int eval(const char *s, const char **outptr)
{
    int a, b, y;
    const char *out;

    switch (*s) {
    case '+':
        a = eval(s + 1, &out);
        b = eval(out, &out);
        y = a + b;
        *outptr = out;
        break;
    case '-':
        a = eval(s + 1, &out);
        b = eval(out, &out);
        y = a - b;
        *outptr = out;
        break;
    case '*':
        a = eval(s + 1, &out);
        b = eval(out, &out);
        y = a * b;
        *outptr = out;
        break;
    case '/':
        a = eval(s + 1, &out);
        b = eval(out, &out);
        y = a / b;
        *outptr = out;
        break;
    default: /* '0'...'9'assumed */
        y = *s - '0';
        *outptr = s + 1;
        break;
    }

    return y;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    const char *end;
    int x;

    x = eval(argv[1], &end);
    printf("%d\n", x);

    return 0;
}

Example:

./eval +3+*45/62
26
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you are giving away the answer to a homework question :) –  perreal Jan 9 '13 at 5:55
    
@perreal I don't mind. :) I'm writing a parser right now, and I'm inside the topic pretty well :P –  user529758 Jan 9 '13 at 5:55
    
I know the urge –  perreal Jan 9 '13 at 5:56
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Assuming you have an input iterator (e.g., a pointer to the input string or a vector iterator), you can use something like this:

compute (input.iterator it) {
  if (it != input.end() and is_operator(*it)) {
     operator op = *it;
     int v1, v2;
     it++;
     v1 = is_operator(*it) ? compute(it) : *it;
     it++;
     v2 = is_operator(*it) ? compute(it) : *it;
     return operator_exec(op, v1, v2) 
  }
  return *it;
}
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This solution will crash on expression with a single value, eg. 42. –  Spook Jan 9 '13 at 5:49
    
thanks, updated –  perreal Jan 9 '13 at 5:51
    
i can't use that either, the froblem is focused on recursion –  Buradi Jan 9 '13 at 5:56
    
@Buradi, this is recursion though –  perreal Jan 9 '13 at 5:57
    
i know i've updated my question becuase i didn't mention what mehtods I am allowed to use –  Buradi Jan 9 '13 at 6:05
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