Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following example code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
   bool same = CreateDelegate(1) == CreateDelegate(1);
}

private static Action CreateDelegate(int x)
{
   return delegate { int z = x; };
}

You would imagine that the two delegate instances would compare to be equal, just as they would when using the good old named method approach (new Action(MyMethod)). They do not compare to be equal because the .NET Framework provides a hidden closure instance per delegate instance. Since those two delegate instances each have their Target properties set to their individual hidden instance, they do not compare. One possible solution is for the generated IL for an anonymous method to store the current instance (this pointer) in the target of the delegate. This will allow the delegates to compare correctly, and also helps from a debugger standpoint since you will see your class being the target, instead of a hidden class.

You can read more about this issue in the bug I submitted to Microsoft. The bug report also gives an example of why we are using this functionality, and why we feel it should be changed. If you feel this to be an issue as well, please help support it by providing rating and validation.

https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/ViewFeedback.aspx?FeedbackID=489518

Can you see any possible reason why the functionality should not be changed? Do you feel this was the best course of action to get the issue resolved, or do you recommend that I should take a different route?

share|improve this question
2  
In which specification did Microsoft mention that these two should be equal? With same reasoning, I can argue that new MyClass() == new MyClass() should be true if MyClass is an empty class, for instance. You're too quick to name a behavior that's not mentioned in any spec as "bug." –  Mehrdad Afshari Sep 14 '09 at 18:19
    
In which specification did they mention that they should not be equal? –  user173231 Sep 14 '09 at 19:51

5 Answers 5

I'm not so inclined to think this is a "bug". It appears moreover that you're assuming some behaviour in the CLR that simply does not exist.

The important thing to understand here is that you are returning a new anonymous method (and initialising a new closure class) each time you call the CreateDelegate method. It seems that you are experting the delegate keyword to use some sort of pool for anonymous methods internally. The CLR certainly does not do this. A delegate to the anonymous method (as with a lambda expression) is created in memory each time you call the method, and since the equality operator does of course compare references in this situation, it is the expected result to return false.

Although your suggested behaviour may have some benefits in certain contexts, it would probably be quite complicated to implement, and would more likely lead to unpredictable scenarios. I think the current behaviour of generating a new anonymous method and delegate on each call is the right one, and I suspect this is the feedback you will get on Microsoft Connect as well.

If you are quite insistent on having the behaviour you described in your question, there is always the option of memoizing your CreateDelegate function, which would insure that the same delegate is returned each time for the same parameters. Indeed, because this is so easy to implement, it is probably one of the several reasons why Microsoft did not consider implementing it in the CLR.

share|improve this answer
    
Lambda expressions have nothing to do with this. Look at the IL. I'm not suggesting any kind of crazy pooling or anything of the sort. I'm simply suggesting that taking implementation aside, how would you, as the developer writing the code, want it to work knowing what you know about the comparison of a delegate. Forget about the implementation details of anonymous methods. I simply want to change it for the better of the developer community and the Framework. –  user173231 Sep 14 '09 at 19:20
    
@BigUnit: Lambda expressions have a lot to do with this. It is precisely because they are generated on the fly that you are experiencing this confusion. Personally, I'm with the .NET Framework devs on this one. If I wrote the code given in the above question, the actual result would be my expected result. Of course, one can hardly classify this 'intuitive' behaviour, but I think you will see it is perfectly reasonably behaviour once you wrap your head around the internal workings of the CLR. –  Noldorin Sep 14 '09 at 19:26
    
@Noldorin: Sorry, I still don't see where the lambda expression fits in. There is no LE in my code, nor in the produced IL. There is certainly no runtime on the fly generation, if that is what you are getting at. –  user173231 Sep 14 '09 at 19:31
    
@Big Unit: My bad. I'm in the habit of using lambda expressions rather than anonymous methods. For the most part, you can treat them as virtually the same thing (though there are certainly some subtle differences). Anyway, the same arugment applies to anonymous methods. And yes, a class is being generated for the closure at runtime. Not in the dynamic sense of course; the class itself is generated by the compiler (JIT?) and simply instantiated on the fly. Either way, a new instance of the hidden class/closure is created every time you call the function, which explains why the refs are inequal. –  Noldorin Sep 14 '09 at 19:49
    
That is correct. The class is already generated ahead of execution though. The references are certainly not equal. In their MSDN information about anonymous methods they state, "By using anonymous methods, you reduce the coding overhead in instantiating delegates by eliminating the need to create a separate method." But that would not be true if I can't count on equality for my implementation. If they would expose a different method of equality to determine if the signatures are equal and I could require an instance to be passed into me. The Method prop is populated via reflection, so yuck. –  user173231 Sep 14 '09 at 19:58

I don't know about the C# specific details of this problem but I worked on the VB.Net equivalent feature which has the same behavior.

The bottom line is this behavior is "By Design" for the following reasons

The first is that in this scenario a closure is unavoidable. You have used a piece of local data within an anonymous method and hence a closure is necessary to capture the state. Every call to this method must create a new closure for a number of reasons. Therefore each delegate will point to an instance method on that closure.

Under the hood a anonymous method / expression is represented by a System.MulticastDelegate derived instance in code. If you look at the Equals method of this class you will notice 2 important details

  • It is sealed so there is no way for a derived delegate to change the equals behavior
  • Part of the Equals method does a reference comparison on the objects

This makes it impossible for 2 lambda expressions which are attached to different closures to compare as equals.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree that today the Framework makes it impossible to compare the anonymous methods. Just because they point to two different instances doesn't mean they can't compare to be equivalent. Sure it would mean a change, but I certainly wouldn't claim it to be impossible so quickly. –  user173231 Sep 14 '09 at 19:27
    
@BigUnit, I'm saying it's impossible given the current state of the BCL. At the same time I also agree the behavior of the BCL is correct. Two instance methods on two objects shouldn't ever compare to be equal. –  JaredPar Sep 14 '09 at 21:04
    
@JaredPar: I understand what you are saying, but it is abstracted away from you. You forgot to mention that the two objects are hidden from the developer. The fact it captures state is just to make it easier on the developer. Give me one good example of existing code that would break from changing this functionality? It sucks there is no good work around to this problem that makes it simple for the person using the API except to not use anonymous methods and be forced to use the Func/Action paradigm. I would then be forced to create the same number of generic classes in my situation, about 30. –  user173231 Sep 15 '09 at 1:11

EDIT: Old answer left for historical value below the line...

The CLR would have to work out the cases in which the hidden classes could be considered equal, taking into account anything that could be done with the captured variables.

In this particular case, the captured variable (x) isn't changed either within the delegate or in the capturing context - but I'd rather the language didn't require this sort of complexity of analysis. The more complicated the language is, the harder it is to understand. It would have to distinguish between this case and the one below, where the captured variable's value is changed on each invocation - there, it makes a great deal of difference which delegate you call; they are in no way equal.

I think it's entirely sensible that this already-complex situation (closures are frequently misunderstood) doesn't try to be too "clever" and work out potential equality.

IMO, you should definitely take a different route. These are conceptually independent instances of Action. Faking it by coercing the delegate targets is a horrible hack IMO.


The problem is that you're capturing the value of x in a generated class. The two x variables are independent, so they're unequal delegates. Here's an example demonstrating the independence:

using System;

class Test
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Action first = CreateDelegate(1);
        Action second = CreateDelegate(1);
        first();
        first();
        first();
        first();
        second();
        second();
    }

    private static Action CreateDelegate(int x)
    {
        return delegate 
        { 
            Console.WriteLine(x);
            x++;
        };
    }
}

Output:

1
2
3
4
1
2

EDIT: To look at it another way, your original program was the equivalent of:

using System;

class Test
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        bool same = CreateDelegate(1) == CreateDelegate(1);
    }

    private static Action CreateDelegate(int x)
    {
        return new NestedClass(x).ActionMethod;
    }

    private class Nested
    {
        private int x;

        internal Nested(int x)
        {
            this.x = x;
        }

        internal ActionMethod()
        {
            int z = x;
        }
    }
}

As you can tell, two separate instances of Nested will be created, and they will be the targets for the two delegates. They are unequal, so the delegates are unequal too.

share|improve this answer
    
I think the OP understands this (well enough), and rather his main question relates to why this is the behaviour of the CLR. –  Noldorin Sep 14 '09 at 17:55
    
@Noldorin: Yup, have reread question and reanswered. –  Jon Skeet Sep 14 '09 at 18:05
    
I do understand why it currently doing what it does. You said, "The more complicated the language is, the harder it is to understand." However, I am not proposing any change to the language itself, but to the underlying generated IL that is already done via compiler. The Framework in a sense is made to make life easier, so why make it more difficult when we don't have to? Changing the Target isn't the best answer, there needs to be a better way. It could store it as a different field in the delegate, or the capture class could store it in a way that the delegate could access for comparison. –  user173231 Sep 14 '09 at 19:04
    
@BigUnit - think about it ... if you had two methods that have the same signature, how do you expect the compiler to really know what you want? You use the name, and the namespace if necessary. Imagine if the compiler replaces the method name with the identical name, because they are the same in signature, and calls the wrong method? Just because they have the same signature doesn't mean they are identical. Even if the body is the same, there can be side effects that the compiler doesn't know about. –  Richard Hein Sep 15 '09 at 3:53
    
@Richard Hein: Anonymous methods are a special case. I made no suggestion to leave all instances out of the picture for comparison of equality. –  user173231 Sep 15 '09 at 4:09

I can't think of a situation where I've ever needed to do that. If I need to compare delegates I always use named delegates, otherwise something like this would be possible:

MyObject.MyEvent += delegate { return x + y; };

MyObject.MyEvent -= delegate { return x + y; };

This example isn't great for demonstrating the issue, but I would imagine that there could be a situation where allowing this could break existing code that was designed with the expectation that this is not allowed.

I'm sure there are internal implementation details that also make this a bad idea, but I don't know exactly how anonymous methods are implemented internally.

share|improve this answer
    
Nobody currently does anything like that because the results would usually be false. But here is a case where the Framework allows such a result: If I have a method like this: public Action CreateDelegate() { return delegate { CallSomeMethod(); }; } And then use that function for my event hookup/removal: MyEvent += CreateDelegate(); MyEvent -= CreateDelegate(); Works without a problem. Even currently there are cases where they will allow them to be equivalent. So, there is no way to write code to determine equivalence today. –  user173231 Sep 15 '09 at 14:03

This behaviour makes sense because otherwise anonymous methods would get mixed up (if they had the same name, given the same body).

You could change your code to this:

static void Main(){   
	bool same = CreateDelegate(1) == CreateDelegate(1);
}

static Action<int> action = (x) => { int z = x; };

private static Action<int> CreateDelegate(int x){
	return action;
}

Or, preferably, since that's a bad way to use it (plus you were comparing the result, and Action doesn't have a return value ... use Func<...> if you want to return a value):

static void Main(){
	var action1 = action;
	var action2 = action;
	bool same = action1 == action2;  // TRUE, of course
}

static Action<int> action = (x) => { int z = x; };
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.