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I have a feeling this has to do with the way BitConverter.ToUInt16 wiorks, but I can't for the life of me figure out why this is giving me funky data.

I need to ignore the first two bits coming in on the port and convert the remaining bits to a 16-bit unsigned integer.

I have tried reversing the array, reversing my mask, doing both, different conversions, and all sorts of weird things.

The two bytes that come in are with the first one being the most significant. The first two bits in the first byte need to be unset.

Can someone point me in the right direction?

byte[] buffer = new byte[2];
int count = port.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);

Console.WriteLine("0: {0}", BitConverter.ToString(buffer));

ushort value = BitConverter.ToUInt16(buffer, 0);

Console.WriteLine("1: {0}", value);

value = (ushort)(value & 0x3FFF);

Console.WriteLine("2: {0}", value);

Here is some sample data when using BitConverter.ToUInt16 and then ANDing with the 0x3FFF mask.

0: 80-00
1: 128
2: 128 <-- this should be 0

0: 80-00
1: 128
2: 128 <-- should be 0

0: 01-00
1: 1
2: 1 <-- should be 1, as it is

0: 80-00
1: 128
2: 128 <-- should be 0

0: 80-00
1: 128
2: 128 <-- should be 0

Reversing the array gives me data like this:

0: 00-01
1: 256
2: 256 <-- should be 1

0: 01-80
1: 32769
2: 1 <- not sure what this should be, probably 1 though
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What do you end up with in value? –  DWright Jan 9 '13 at 6:30
    
@DWright I added it to the question, thanks. –  Michael J. Gray Jan 9 '13 at 6:43
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just so people have the full code for the serial port reading and converting of a 14-bit unsigned big endian integer.

private static void OnDataReceived(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
{
    SerialPort port = sender as SerialPort;
    if (port.BytesToRead < sizeof(ushort))
    {
        return;
    }

    byte[] buffer = new byte[2];
    int count = port.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);

    ushort value = (ushort)(((buffer[0] << 8) | buffer[1]) & 0x3FFF);
    Console.WriteLine(value);
}
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The two bytes that come in are with the first one being the most significant.

That's the problem. BitConverter.ToUInt16 treats the first byte as the least significant, because that's how your system works. See BitConverter.IsLittleEndian.

I have tried reversing the array,

That should work. Alternatively, combine the two bytes manually, without using BitConverter.

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I've tried manually combining the two bytes by taking the first and left shifting by 8 and then ORing it against the second and then applying the mask. Is the mask correct? –  Michael J. Gray Jan 9 '13 at 6:51
    
Yes, that looks correct to me. 0x3FFF has bits 0-13 set, and bit 14 and 15 cleared, so and-ing with that clears the top 2 bits. –  hvd Jan 9 '13 at 7:03
    
So what I have currently is just doing what I explained in my first comment to your answer. I receive some results as correct and others not so correct. Specifically when the device transmits 1, I receive 80-01 and when the device transmits what I think is 2, I receive 02-00. Any thoughts on why my masking isn't calculating the value appropriately? –  Michael J. Gray Jan 9 '13 at 7:05
    
@MichaelJ.Gray Your question suggests 2 gets sent as 00 02 (or 80 02 or such). If it doesn't, you first need to figure out the rules your device uses for sending data. –  hvd Jan 9 '13 at 7:07
    
The raw data I get sent for a 1 is sometimes 01 00 and also sometimes 80 01. The first two bits of either 16-bit unsigned integers needs to be ignored, so the values should be the same since the most significant byte is first in the series. So, the most significant bits of the most significant byte need to be ignored. 10 1C = 28 (dec) is the example provided in my documentation. –  Michael J. Gray Jan 9 '13 at 7:11
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