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What is the simplest command to convert a multi-line file into a single line file in Unix?

Sample data in the file is

SELECT * FROM TABLE1 t1
   JOIN TABLE2 t2 ON (t1.ID = t2.ID)
   WHERE t1.ID = 123

Desired output is

SELECT * FROM TABLE1 t1 JOIN TABLE2 t2 ON (t1.ID = t2.ID) WHERE t1.ID = 123

I have tried using :

/bin/sed '{:q;N;s/  / /g;s/\n//g;t q}' $1

But it is not successful. Thank you for the help.

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4 Answers 4

It looks like you're trying to update an sql stored in unix directory. If you have Notepad++ installed, you can just replace \r\n with either a space or an empty string. Be sure to select "Extended" in the search mode

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Try using sed like this:

sed ':a; N; $!ba; s/\n\s*/ /g' file

Or using awk like this:

awk '{ $1 = $1 }1' RS= file

Results:

SELECT * FROM TABLE1 t1 JOIN TABLE2 t2 ON (t1.ID = t2.ID) WHERE t1.ID = 123
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1  
Thanks! It's good to learn something new! –  Lei Mou Jan 9 '13 at 7:19

With Perl:

perl -p -e'chomp' filename

Addendum:

If it's important to have a trailing newline and for leading whitespace to get removed from each line, you could do this:

perl -l -n -e's/^\s+//; push @x, $_; END { print join( ' ', @x ); }' filename
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You may as well use tr -d "\n" < file as neither of these solutions will remove any leading whitespace. These solutions also remove the last newline character in the file, which could have downstream consequences. –  Steve Jan 9 '13 at 7:11
    
+1 i was about to answer the same –  Vijay Jan 9 '13 at 7:29

The simplest way (depending on the definition of "simple") is:

tr -s \\n ' '

If you want the output to have a newline:

 { tr -s \\n \ < input-file && echo; } > output-file
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