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Is there any way to "automatically" run finalization / destructor code as soon as a variable loses scope in a .Net language? It appears to me that since the garbage collector runs at an indeterminate time, the destructor code is not run as soon as the variable loses scope. I realize I could inherit from IDisposable and explicitly call Dispose on my object, but I was hoping that there might be a more hands-off solution, similar to the way non-.Net C++ handles object destruction.

Desired behavior (C#):

public class A {
    ~A { [some code I would like to run] }
}

public void SomeFreeFunction() {
    SomeFreeSubFunction();
    // At this point, I would like my destructor code to have already run.
}

public void SomeFreeSubFunction() {
    A myA = new A();
}

Less desirable:

public class A : IDisposable {
    [ destructor code, Dispose method, etc. etc.]
}

public void SomeFreeFunction() {
    SomeFreeSubFunction();
}

public void SomeFreeSubFunction() {
    A myA = new A();
    try {
        ...
    }
    finally {
        myA.Dispose();
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The using construct comes closest to what you want:

using (MyClass o = new MyClass()) 
{
 ...
}

Dispose() is called automatically, even if an exception occurred. But your class has to implement IDisposable.

But that doesn't mean the object is removed from memory. You have no control over that.

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(+1) Good to note that "using" is shorthand for utilizing the Dispose method and specifically not for utilizing the destructor and removing the object from memory. –  Matt Hamsmith Sep 14 '09 at 19:36

The using keyword with an object implementing IDisposable does just that.

For instance:

using(FileStream stream = new FileStream("string", FileMode.Open))
{
    // Some code
}

This is replaced by the compiler to:

FileStream stream = new FileStream("string", FileMode.Open);
try
{
    // Some code
}
finally
{
    stream.Dispose();
}
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Unfortunately, no.

Your best option is to implement IDisposable with the IDisposable pattern.

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See also bluebytesoftware.com/blog/… –  TrueWill Sep 15 '09 at 2:16

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