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I've been writing a data base in C for some time and yesterday I got an error I can not cope with. The case is that ,when I was writing loading from .txt function, there were some mistakes after the program read the data from .txt. (f.e. it was "84683-3478- " instead of "1993-5-13") I tried to change sth and then the crap happened and I've been receiving such error since that time:

"Segmentation fault" -> on Linux "Call Stack memory" -> on Windows

I don't truly know where the problem is because I didn't change much(the way of putting the text) but crap happened. I'm pasting the function for you. Could you help, please?

void load(struct player *main)
{
    int bad;
    struct player *act, *prev;    // act- actual prev - previous
    FILE *plik;
    char a;
    char text[l];                 // l=15;
    if((plik = fopen("savings.txt", "r")) == NULL)
    {
        printf("No savings\n");
        return;
    }
    if(fgets(text, l, plik) == NULL)
    {
        printf("No saved things\n");
        return;
    }
    printf("These are your savings\n");
    do
    {
        printf("%s", text);
    }while(fgets(text, l, plik) != NULL);
    fclose(plik);
    printf("\nType the name of the file you want to load (with .txt) \n");
    do
    {
        gets(text);         // here program stops, no matter if the name is right or not
        char *text = (char*) malloc(30);
        while (getchar()!='\n')
            continue;
        strcat(text, ".txt");
        printf("%s", *text);
        if((plik = fopen(text, "r")) == NULL)
        {
            printf("There is no such file, type once again \n");
            bad=1;
        }
        else bad=0;
    }while(bad);
    act = main->next;
    while(act != NULL)              //cleaning the actual data base
    {
        prev = act;
        act = act->next;
        free(prev);
    }
    nr_of_players = 0;
    act = main;
    while(fscanf(plik, "%s", act->name)!=0)
    {
        fscanf(plik, "%s", biez->surname);
        fscanf(plik, "%d", &biez->date_y);
        fscanf(plik, "%d", &biez->date_m);
        fscanf(plik, "%d", &biez->date_d);
        fscanf(plik, "%s", biez->position);
        fscanf(plik, "%c", &a);
        fscanf(plik, "%d", &biez->nr_cart);
        fscanf(plik, "%d", &biez->salary);
        fscanf(plik, "%d", &biez->matches);
        act->id = ++nr_of_players;
        act->next = (struct player*) malloc(sizeof(struct player));
        prev = act;
        act = act->next;
    }
    free(act);
    prev->next = NULL;
    fclose(plik);
}
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closed as too localized by Corbin, valex, AProgrammer, Björn Kaiser, J. Steen Jan 9 '13 at 12:18

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
please use proper code indentation, if you want people to read your code. –  Andreas Grapentin Jan 9 '13 at 8:31
1  
Thou shalt not cast the result of malloc in C. –  Paul R Jan 9 '13 at 8:33
    
And why are you declaring text twice ? –  Paul R Jan 9 '13 at 8:35

4 Answers 4

You are doing:

char *text = (char*) malloc(30);
while (getchar()!='\n')
  continue;
strcat(text, ".txt");
printf("%s", *text);

The last printf should be:

printf("%s", text);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot :) –  user1960582 Jan 9 '13 at 8:51
char text[l];                 // l=15;
 .... deleted a bunch of lines ....
do
{
gets(text);         // here program stops, no matter if the name is right or not
char *text = (char*) malloc(30);
while (getchar()!='\n')
  continue;
strcat(text, ".txt");

Note that text[l] is used for gets() - and gets is a BAD function to use, as it doesn't prevent overwriting the end of the input buffer AT ALL. It will just crash (or do something else unexpected).

Instead of gets(), use fgets(stdin, ...).

The code als doesn't make sense.

Why are you allocating a new variable called text that shadows the text you just read something into

If you want a 30 byte string, just create the string with 30 bytes in the first place, rather than 15.

Also, please, please, please don't use variables/constants called l or O - unless you are entering the "obfuscated C competiton". They look far too much like the digits One and Zero.

share|improve this answer

char *text = (char*) malloc(30);

why are you named it text, try some another name, you have already declared text at the start of function.

char text[l];

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code review

initialize all variables when declaring them

void load(struct player *main)
{
    int bad = 0;
    struct player *act = NULL, *prev =  NULL;    
    FILE *plik = NULL;
    char a = '\0';

don´t use "l" as a constant it is difficult to distinguish between l and 1 depending on what font used.

    char text[l] = {0};                 // l=15;


    if((plik = fopen("savings.txt", "r")) == NULL)
    {
        printf("No savings\n");
        return;
    }

prefer doing sizeof(text) instead of using "l" here

    if(fgets(text, sizeof(text), plik) == NULL)

    printf("\nType the name of the file you want to load (with .txt) \n");
    do
    {
        // here if user puts his elbow on the keyb it crashes the 
        // program use fgets(buffer,sizeof(buffer),stdin) instead.
        gets(text); 

Never hide a variablename in another scope, use a new variable name

        char *mytext = malloc(30); // in C don´t cast malloc 

Below you are doing strcat on "text" however you just malloc:ed it so there could be anything in the buffer, you should clear the buffer before doing strcat() or use strcpy(_s) / or maybe it was just a typo?

        strcat(text, ".txt");

A string in C is a sequence of characters, %s says to printf to expect the address of a string of characters ending with \0 but with *text you are giving a character value to it, that will not end well.

        printf("%s", *text);

it is good to have use {} when you can, not just sometimes

        if((plik = fopen(text, "r")) == NULL)
        {
            printf("There is no such file, type once again \n");
            bad=1;
        }
        else bad=0;  
    }while(bad);

check that "main" points to something proper before using it.

    if ( main != NULL )
    {
      act = main->next;
      while(act != NULL)
      {
        prev = act;
        act = act->next;
        free(prev);
      }
    ...

here i would suggest you read in the data using fgets() instead and parse the data using sscanf() the way you do it is fragile.

    nr_of_players = 0;
    act = main;
    while(fscanf(plik, "%s", act->name)!=0)
    {
        fscanf(plik, "%s", biez->surname);
        fscanf(plik, "%d", &biez->date_y);
        fscanf(plik, "%d", &biez->date_m);
        fscanf(plik, "%d", &biez->date_d);
        fscanf(plik, "%s", biez->position);
        fscanf(plik, "%c", &a);
        fscanf(plik, "%d", &biez->nr_cart);
        fscanf(plik, "%d", &biez->salary);
        fscanf(plik, "%d", &biez->matches);
        act->id = ++nr_of_players;

this is unusual, normally you allocate when you find something to put in instead of allocating for the case there may be more to put in.

        act->next = malloc(sizeof(struct player));
        prev = act;
        act = act->next;
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Also don't name any identifier "main" is C, for obvious reasons. As we can tell from this good code review, the original code deserves bugs. –  Lundin Jan 9 '13 at 9:48

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