Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i'm trying to write a program in which a word as a string is provided as an input and i have to rearrange the word such that it just changes the order of the letters in a word by moving all the vowels to the end, keeping them in the same order as they appeared in the original word

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string word = "application";
            char[] letters = word.ToCharArray();
            char x = new char { };
            for (int j = 0; j < letters.Length; j++)
            {
                if ((letters[j] == 'a') | (letters[j] == 'e' ) | (letters[j] == 'i' ) | (letters[j] == 'o' ) | (letters[j] 

== 'u'))
                {
                    for (int i = 0; i < letters.Length - 1; i++)
                    {
                        x = letters[i];
                        letters[i] = letters[i + 1];
                        letters[i + 1] = x;
                    }
                }
            }
            string s = new string(letters);
            Console.WriteLine(s);
        }
    }
}

the output of the program is

ationaplic

but the intended output of program is

pplctnaiaio

Why is my code not producing my intended output?

The edited working code is

namespace VowelSort
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string word = "application";
            char[] letters = word.ToCharArray();
            char x = new char { };
            int count = 0;
            for (int j = 0; j < letters.Length - count; j++)
            {
                if ((letters[j] == 'a') | (letters[j] == 'e') | (letters[j] == 'i') | (letters[j] == 'o') | (letters[j] == 'u') | (letters[j] == 'A') | (letters[j] == 'E') | (letters[j] == 'I') | (letters[j] == 'O') | (letters[j] == 'U'))
                {
                    for (int i = j; i < letters.Length - 1; i++)
                    {
                        x = letters[i];
                        letters[i] = letters[i + 1];
                        letters[i + 1] = x;

                    }
                    count++;
                    j--;
                }

            }
            string s = new string(letters);
            Console.WriteLine(s);
            Console.WriteLine(count);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
The output is ationapplic on my computer? –  Soner Gönül Jan 9 '13 at 8:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There are three problems I found here:

  1. When you find a vowel, you start your inner loop at 0 so you always move the first character to the end. Start it at j instead.
  2. After you've moved a vowel, you start your outer loop at the next letter - so if you have two vowels in a row, you skip the second one (because it's been moved behind he "current" position"). After you're done moving a vowel, decrement j.
  3. You run your outer loop right to the end, but you should stop it when you get to the vowels you've already moved. Keep count of the number of vowels you've moved, and stop your outer loop when you get to that many characters from the end.

Try to implement these changes yourself, but if you get stuck I can give you some pointers.

Once you have this working, you might like to speed up your inner loop by realising you don't have to perform multiple pairwise swaps - you can just note the vowel you've found, move everything after it up one character, and then insert the vowel at the end.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1. You explain why the code of the OP does not work which is, I think, better than giving ready to use code. –  Guillaume Jan 9 '13 at 9:04
    
i mistakenly put the wrong code in the question i apologize for that –  Justice Jan 9 '13 at 9:24
    
@MustansirSabir, the code in your original question was much closer to being correct. The current code will only move the first vowel to the end of the string. –  Rawling Jan 9 '13 at 9:29
    
as you suggested i followed you 1st and 2nd point but the output window doesnot display anything now if ((letters[j] == 'a') | (letters[j] == 'e') | (letters[j] == 'i') | (letters[j] == 'o') | (letters[j] == 'u')) { for (int i = j; i < letters.Length - 1; i++) { x = letters[i]; letters[i] = letters[i + 1]; letters[i + 1] = x; } count++; j--; } –  Justice Jan 9 '13 at 9:51
    
That looks pretty good; have you changed your outer for-loop to end on j < letters.Length - count too? If so, this should now work for you. (If you haven't, you end up repeatedly moving a vowel and decrementing j so the loop will never terminate and you'll never get your output printed - maybe this is what you're seeing at the moment.) –  Rawling Jan 9 '13 at 9:56

Having

static char[] vowels = new char[] { 'a', 'e', 'i', 'o', 'u' };

use this LINQ query:

string s = "absdiuoc";
string result = string.Concat(s.ToCharArray()
                                .GroupBy(c => vowels.Contains(c))
                                .OrderBy(g => g.Key)
                                .SelectMany(g => g));
share|improve this answer
    
I was just apout to post an almost identical solution. Anyway here's a live example using this code: rextester.com/TGAZ20052 and it does give the OP's required result. –  Jamiec Jan 9 '13 at 8:41
    
Oh, 1 point though - y is not generally considered a vowel in English. –  Jamiec Jan 9 '13 at 8:42
1  
When the asker's posted some code that is very close to working, it's a bit harsh to propose a completely different solution. –  Rawling Jan 9 '13 at 8:46
1  
that code is working pretty well but i want to do it using for and if loops –  Justice Jan 9 '13 at 8:48
1  
For the record I totally disagree with the comments above. If the OP is doing something in an overly compex way I think providing a cleaner, neater solution is a more-than-valid answer. It will help future visitors more, and it helps the OP More. IMO –  Jamiec Jan 9 '13 at 9:33

Use a simple LINQ query:

word = String.Concat(word.OrderBy(c => "aeiou".Contains(c)));
share|improve this answer
    
Downvoter care to explain why they think it's wrong? –  Rotem Jan 9 '13 at 8:47
1  
my +1: it does the job. –  horgh Jan 9 '13 at 8:49
    
Nice trick. Never realized bool are also valid for ordering parameter –  Martheen Jan 9 '13 at 8:57

When your code identifies a vowel, it moves it to the end of the array (thus moving all the letters one space to the left). However your outer loop is still moving on to the next character which means you will miss a vowel if there are successive vowels:

For example, consider the word 'air'. When the variable i is at 0, the 'a' is moved to the end:

air
^ i=0

i gets incremented to 1 missing the 'i' now at index zero:

ira
 ^ i=1

(You will also need to ensure your outer loop stops before it gets to the vowels that have been moved already.)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.